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Cracking the voice on attacking a note?

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manadoo
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I've noticed that tons of broadway singers do this thing where they slightly crack the note when the attack it. You can see examples of it here:

At 2:39 on the word "on"

At 1:18 on the word "france"

At 0:58 on the word "cross"

I think it actually sounds really awesome and it's definitely intentional, since I've seen Ramin Karimloo live and he cracks on the same notes when attacking it. I'd like to know how to do it. I'm trying to do it by starting the note on a higher note in falsetto for a very tiny period of time then going to the note. It sounds okay, but I don't think that's how they do it.

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The "on" and "france" sounds to me as if the singer was aborting his phrase and then started again but added an windy "h" before the rest of the word. Its really short with the "on" but more noticeable with "france". Do you understand what I mean? I could record an example if necessary.

I am not sure what bruno mars does.

But the "h"-thing is also a really cool way to make sure you are not straining on a high note because it activates the breath support.

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What you described (short falsetto before the note) is what I hear in the first two, for sure. I don't hear that in the Bruno clip. I do hear him using vocal fry before some of his notes.

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Hmm, I seem to be able to do it on most consonants then, but I still don't get how to do it on a hard c or k, cause it seems to come after the consonant somehow.

At 3:22 there's a much better example on "drinking" of him cracking on that c consonant. And again at 3:43 he does it on the p consonant, which also seems impossible to do with that short falsetto before the actual note.

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In the last video That crack in "Drinkin" It sounded like he is using falsetto slip on "IN". The "Drink" part is full. The "Ih" is falsetto slip then a solid "N". So slight falsetto in the very beginning of the Ih sound in 'drink-Ih-n"

Edit he is also using that hard consonant to kick into the falsetto. More like Drin- K-ih n. Same thing with P-Ih-ano.

Each of those examples that you posted are a slip into and out of falsetto. Either starting the note in falsetto for a quick interval or kicking into it from a hard consonant.

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Hey!

Is this the same that you are asking for? To me it is. In second 00:23 and 00:28.

I do that by thinking of crying ( just as the lyrics say, haha ) and it just happens. The folds keep adducted, but it is a very heady thing.

Someone said falsetto before, but if we are considering falsetto to be full breathy tone it will be very hard to do this and in my voice, dangerous. ( And it will be like yodeling :D Which i so cool, haha )

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Hey!

Is this the same that you are asking for? To me it is. In second 00:23 and 00:28.

I do that by thinking of crying ( just as the lyrics say, haha ) and it just happens. The folds keep adducted, but it is a very heady thing.

Someone said falsetto before, but if we are considering falsetto to be full breathy tone it will be very hard to do this and in my voice, dangerous. ( And it will be like yodeling :D Which i so cool, haha )

I think we are still saying the same thing. You have full adduction but let go of it for a fraction of a second. Either while starting a note or ending it, or moving between a consonant into a vowel. That quick of a burst into falsetto is not going to be harmful.

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I don't think it would be harmful MDEW, in fact yodel singers do that all the time, they go from full air bleed to overdrive and stuff like that. But with my voice, when I do too much breathy stuff ( be it on the chest area or higher falsettos ) I start to feel heat and a tickle in my left side of the throat, so I've been avoiding doing breathy stuff for a good while.

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Manadoo, admire what the singers do, and then do your own thing and it will work.

In the McLaughlin video, he uses different vowels, articulation, even has a different vocal weight than Billy Joel.

And captures the spirit of the song. Don't get me wrong, learning a technical trick is fine. But let it serve the feeling of the song.

Some people can do that flip easily. Having listened to Billy Joel for quite some time, I don't think Joel could flip like this guy does. Who's better? Neither.

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how to sing consonants (hard and soft) is a skill you need to develop....a simple little trick like changing a "t" to a "d" can make a big difference and help you maintain your breath flow.

like in billy joel's "say goodbye to hollywood" or chris isaak's "wicked game" when he sings "what a wicked thing to do."

scroll up to and read chapter 4

http://books.google.com/books?id=2U3kqR_RtwAC&pg=PT74&lpg=PT74&dq=sing+hard+and+soft+consonants&source=bl&ots=iDg5X1n61u&sig=cftfqaH0eG-7BRp3lUtvJxIgflA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=4AHpU5aKBc_9yQSbvoKYDg&ved=0CDcQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=sing%20hard%20and%20soft%20consonants&f=false

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