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New Vocalist Here: Beginner tips & endurance/stamina tips?

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BGrizzMayne
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Hey guys-

I'm somewhat of a new singer at 23. I've been singing harmony in a cover band for the last couple years, but kind of weasled my way through it. I can hit the notes, but don't have to take as much ownership over them because I'm the harmony.

When I first started, I noticed my voice would get very tired and I'd struggle to make it through gigs, just singing harmony. As time has gone on, my range has increased a bit and my endurance is much better.

With that said, I've been recording myself singing lead & demo-ing some tunes that I've written. I've been working on a cover of Hoobastank's "The Reason" and can sing the song cleanly/well for 3 times through, but after I continue to keep going, my throat gets scratchier and I find those notes not coming out as cleanly as before.

I've watched/read some material on how to improve, such as staying upright, breathing through my diaphram, etc. but there isn't much concise information out there. I'm one of those 'i was a baritone' but have busted through that a bit. Maybe was just an untrained tenor the whole time. A similar thing happens when I'm singing 30 seconds to mars' "Kings & Queens" I can sing the notes a few times, but then I run out.

Anyways, any tips for stamina/endurance and increasing range? I know both are things that will take a TON of time. I'd love to front my own cover band someday, but I'm going to need the vocal endurance/technique to perform the 3 hours sets required. Any thoughts/resources? I've been thinking about hiring a vocal coach for a few lessons here in KC.

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Train... get a good teacher and invest in a product that gives you content to train... don't look for "secret tips" and rely on YT teaser content to show you the way... I have a product and offer Skype lessons and would be happy to help you. Contact me privately if you would like...

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practice with an "oh" vowel

Sorry but this ridiculous...endurance and stamina is not as simple as what vowel you practice!

Robert gave some great advice.

I would add, endurance and stamina is practically not even a "strength" game at all, it is mostly about finesse. It is about technique which involves reduction of constriction in unwanted areas like the jaw, chin, neck, shoulders, chest, while being sure to really fuel our power with good control of the respiratory system, turning that into efficient vibration with the intrinsic musculature of the larynx, and finally multiplying its sonic power with good resonance.

That's pretty much the basis of any great singing technique - find a teacher or program that teaches it and you're in good hands.

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Endurance is perhaps less than 5% about actual muscular endurance of the laryngeal mechanisms (and that only when you're talking about very high and loud singing like high belting) and at least 95% about sheer efficiency. Centrally important to efficiency are learning how to use less air, and gaining independent control of the false vocal folds. You can start on the latter by working out on your own how to exhale while controlling how much turbulence (noise) is occurring, and once you can exhale completely silently, then working on incorporating that into actual phonation. This takes a LOT of time, but that control is the only way to get to an effortless and efficient production.

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you will find you will gain so much when you learn to manage your breath and support. make the lower core where you're effort resides...learn to control exhalation.

right now your effort probably resides with your vocal folds which cannot sustain the air pressure and hard application you are sending them.

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The tongue is not located directly on your face but it is a large muscle group that perhaps plays the most important roll in singing after your vocal chords. Your tongue allows for articulation, diversification in notes or sounds, and even allows you to "vocalize" non vocal sounds such as the "sss" sound that a snake might make. The tongue allows you to make that distinct sound without activating your vocal chords. The tongue is the key player in diction and articulation and is essential to performing simple and complex vocalizations.

Here's a video to help you sing better: How to Do Lip Roll Vocal Exercises

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