Jump to content

Vocal type...

Rate this topic


David_kylie
 Share

Recommended Posts

Ok so i know classification doesent mean anything but i would still like to know your opinion.

My range is (comfortable) from G2-G#4 but can hit A4 when warmed up and ready to go which is kinda baritone range.

On the other hand my timbre feels very very "high" or in other words not as dark as u would expect out of a baritone so more tenorish.

My question is how would i go and classify myself. I curently cant post an audio of me singing but just based on these 2 infprmation what would u say.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It doesnt say anything, range have very little to do with classification. also classification is Old bullshit that doesnt really hold much facts other then mindless thinking.

Tbh its just my way to cope with my progress and kinda strong standing point for me to get some motivation to move on. I know it sounds silly but the more i learn about my voice it makes my motivation rise

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be bummed the (*auto edit*) out if after all the work I've put into my "baritone" voice someone tells me I'm clearly a tenor.

EDIT: And we'll figure it out, don't worry, just get the basic "sound recorder" application that comes with every OS ever made with almost every computing system ever made working. ;) You don't have to sing. Just speaking for a couple of minutes should be enough to define what your vocal weight is, if you feel it really is relevant to your process.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still the qoute stands, people who focus to much on voicetypes and various other pseudostuff in singing usually gets the focus wrong.

Our voices can make millions of diffrent sounds and you can train your range to become very very big, focus on that instead of trying to be sorted by the hogwarts sortinghat :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok so i know classification doesent mean anything but i would still like to know your opinion.

My range is (comfortable) from G2-G#4 but can hit A4 when warmed up and ready to go which is kinda baritone range.

On the other hand my timbre feels very very "high" or in other words not as dark as u would expect out of a baritone so more tenorish.

My question is how would i go and classify myself. I curently cant post an audio of me singing but just based on these 2 infprmation what would u say.

It's difficult to tell what your classical fach is unless you are singing a classical song. You could be light or lyric baritone. You could be helden tenor. No way to tell without that elusive recording.

However, if you are singing pop, rock, anything besides classical, that I can help you with. Your voice type is goosenfrabe.

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

G2 is not very low for a Baritone. But if you are really strong down at G2 maybe you could be a baritone. But the choice would still be yours because a Baritone can train to become a Tenor - example: Bergonzi. So take your pick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well im not really a tenor fan...my favourite type is actually baritones as i feel they can produce a bit more power in the upper range, at least it kinda sounds more powerfull because of the general timbre, or at least thats how i percieved it so far

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Voice type is secondary. Record yourself and find out what you can do. Make up your mind about what want to be able to do. Work determinedly for years. And succeed! :)

We all have stories about coming to terms with our voices. I started out by concluding that I couldn't hit high notes - in a tone that was pleasing to others, anyway. So I focused on the low end for years (playing more than actually working). After progressing a bit and learning a little about support, I discovered a lot of potential in the higher range but nothing new happened to my lows. So now I have to adjust my "voice identity" to the fact that I can't even pull off a convincing baritone and that I was just excessively darkening of my timbre for all those years to sound bariton-y. (And I still have no idea what I'd develope into if I were to train opera.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tenor. Regardless of you singing this song lower than the original. The weight or timbral quality of your voice is reminiscent of tenor. Generally speaking, a tenor should be able to sing between C3 and C5 for an evening show, a few times a week, or however long the show is running, such as several weeks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tenor. Regardless of you singing this song lower than the original. The weight or timbral quality of your voice is reminiscent of tenor. Generally speaking, a tenor should be able to sing between C3 and C5 for an evening show, a few times a week, or however long the show is running, such as several weeks.

Thanks mate..and im not intentionally singing it lower..its just random chords i found few months ago and recorded

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thinketh that Khassera speaketh a great truth. eth. Most guys that thought they were baritone really were not. Quite often, they were tenors who had not yet found a way to negotiate the passagio.

That being said, we do have some baritones here who sing tenor stuff all the time. Some of them could, at least for a while, sing higher than I can and I can sing pretty high.

So, in the end, a fach or type description really only has use when singing opera, as in being cast in a role. But, as I said before, most tenor roles in classical singing range between C3 to C5. If you can go outside those limits, great, wonderful, happy days, but the casting person or director is looking for someone who's wheel house is in the 4th octave without wearing out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...