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What do you think about "Speech Level Singing"?

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anjawer
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Hey there! I'm studying jazz singing in Vienna (7. semester). When I was younger I had 4 years classical vocal lessons, which is for my opinion completly different than "speech singing". Back than I had problems with my voice, and sometimes I felt pain while singing.

I never knew, how can some singer reach very high notes without any problem, but than I discovered this speech singing techniqe.

Now (since I'm studying jazz singing) I can say I never had/have any problems with my voice, and I can reach (with my mixed voice) very high notes, and it sounds "full". Speech Level Singing makes singing as natural and easy as speaking. I think this metode is healthy and good for all singers and I really suggest it!! :) It is better to have a personal coach, but youtube-videos are also very usefull. What do you think which singing techniqe is also good? :)

one good example with Seth Riggs:

Greetings

Anja

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In my opinion SLS is not a great method but it will work okay if taught correctly and interpreted correctly by the student. The problem is both of those things are rare.

The same things can happen with classical technique but it just tends to happen more among teachers who charge what they're really worth. A lot of SLS coaches (the ones advertising all over the internet especially) are getting away with teaching it wrong for extremely high prices and that's what if watch out for

You say you are studying with a jazz teacher and its working? Then just stick with that. You're more likely to have a bad experience changing teachers than sticking with what works. Vocal teachers that really make you better at singing in the long run are rare.

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I don't know much about this SLS stuff but it sounds like, to me, something very modern. What I mean by modern is that it is geared toward singing with a mic or recording. Volume is controlled by the mixer. While in older vocal methods people entertained in their living rooms and in concert halls without a mic and had to learn how to project naturally. I think the old methods lead to a stronger more tonefull voice. But that's just me.

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I don't know much about this SLS stuff but it sounds like, to me, something very modern. What I mean by modern is that it is geared toward singing with a mic or recording. Volume is controlled by the mixer. While in older vocal methods people entertained in their living rooms and in concert halls without a mic and had to learn how to project naturally. I think the old methods lead to a stronger more tonefull voice. But that's just me.

What old methods do you have in mind? Can you give us some examples?

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Done right and in combination with other methods, I think it's one of the better programs. I did it a long time ago, stopped and recently went back to it and it's really helping, especially with cord compression which many other methods don't go that much into even though they're good. I was getting good twang but was starting to sing with less cord compression than before. So I might start a vocal training session with SLS and then go into KTVA or Pillars or RYV. I'm really starting to think that they combine well.

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What old methods do you have in mind? Can you give us some examples?

Nope!:) You take my post too literal. I only mean back in the day before there were mics. People sang acoustically. But even today we have classical and opera where you aren't dependent on a mixer or a sound system to project your voice. These days you can sing very softly but be heard like you are screaming with a few mixing tricks.

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In my opinion SLS is not a great method but it will work okay if taught correctly and interpreted correctly by the student. The problem is both of those things are rare.

The same things can happen with classical technique but it just tends to happen more among teachers who charge what they're really worth. A lot of SLS coaches (the ones advertising all over the internet especially) are getting away with teaching it wrong for extremely high prices and that's what if watch out for

You say you are studying with a jazz teacher and its working? Then just stick with that. You're more likely to have a bad experience changing teachers than sticking with what works. Vocal teachers that really make you better at singing in the long run are rare.

I agree that some SLS coaches are getting with teaching it wrong for high prices. Responsible professional teachers should tell you that every singer needs individualized instruction and there is no formula to fix vocal problems. practice practice... and hope to find a good teacher.

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Nope!:) You take my post too literal. I only mean back in the day before there were mics. People sang acoustically. But even today we have classical and opera where you aren't dependent on a mixer or a sound system to project your voice. These days you can sing very softly but be heard like you are screaming with a few mixing tricks.

Oh, sorry! :) agree!

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seth's "method" is based on the old school ways. he studied with Tito Schipa in my opinion (and many great opera singers)one of the greatest tenors of all time..Sls is fine just know how it works for you. in other words if you find yourself to heady don't be to heady and if you find yourself to chesty and heavy don't be so chesty and heavy. find YOUR balance. good luck on your studies.. i wanna live in Vienna ;)

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Awesome thread. You find a program that works for you and stick with it. Popular, or not. Inexpensive, or not.

And, also, there is nothing wrong with studying more than one system. Often is the case where a person does quite well with one system, then picks up ideas from another, as he or she sees fit to use.

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What are the principles of SLS exactly? How is it different?

There are a couple of answers.

The biased answer will take the literal route, saying "SLS is what it is: singing as you speak" and then you'll hear how it isn't possible, how it's stupid, how it's meow and retarded etc etc, you'll probably hear a load of ad hominem arguments made, since they're extremely popular in this certain discussion, and you'll end up deducing that SLS is completely and totally heretical to the industry, and all people affiliated with it should be crucified.

The objective answer, which I've heard first form a certain vocal coach here actually, will tell you all programs aim to achieve the same end result: An improved singing technique, and all programs will go their own routes to achieve it.

If you can't find anything positive about a program it's probably because of a lack of understanding, or, rather, a lack of "harmony" between you and the program.

I've tried a couple of program. The SLS-based program and the heavy chest belt program by Sven Kamplin. I actually achieved the tone of the latter by the exercises of the former, but I "lost the tone" since I emphasized the wrong things when doing the latter. Meaning if I had started with the latter while trusting what I learned from the former I would have gotten better faster.

I didn't, because I drank the kool aid and believed the upbraiding you'll hear of SLS programs, telling me to forget everything they ever taught. Man, I was dumb as a stump.

Having said all that, I don't think there's a direct, all-encompassing answer to "what are the principles of SLS?" If there is, I'd love to hear it.

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Its Speech Level, not Speech Like.

And Speech Level singing is pretty much all singing that is done on... Speech Level. Not louder than you calling someone that is far.

As Dan mentioned, the basis of the method is pretty much classical, from the italian school. With the benefits, if done properly. AND the problems (the 2 registers system, chest & head, as much as I like it, is just wrong).

In the end it will be resumed to the quality of the orientation. Methods may vary, but singing technique is all the same since now things are known in the physiological level.

Hope it helps!

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There are many different reasons, depending on the context Khassera, but I think the most obvious one is that it began as way that people had to describe what they felt: voice coming from chest, and voice coming from head.

Coolbeans.

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as felipe was saying, the term "speech level" can be easily misinterpreted.

you can build a powerful voice with sls just as much as any other program when you apply yourself.

as a singer, i personally do not like the term "sing like you speak." that also can be very misleading.

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Here is the SLS intro video with Seth himself.

Ultimately, these programs are less about "the right way to sing", rather "a way to teach someone". Having purchased and read and reviewed almost all of the programs, it took a while to understand what was being described in each of these. Years later, I completely understand what SLS is trying to do. However, at the time, when I started with it, it actually caused me the most problem. Why? No discussion of breath or support. No discussion of resonance shifts, etc. Seth makes it sound like like you simply convert from speaking to singing. But if you speak poorly, with a lot of tension (like I do), SLS just makes one problem get even worse.

1 or 2 lessons with a live instructor did more to help me out than ALL the books / lessons I've purchased. Best yet, the instructor was able to clarify a lot of things, which made the books/lessons suddenly "make sense". So are the books / lessons useless? Not any more. But at the beginning, they hurt more than they helped. At least with my voice.

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Here is the SLS intro video with Seth himself.

Verily, I say unto thee, watcheth out for and deletest thou the "s" in the https in the link. Or there shall be great wailing and gnashing of teeth.

Edited to add: well, I tried to fix the link, then I followed the link and copied it anew and tried to use the embed button but it won't work or is disabled.

Oh well, life goes on.

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In a nutshell because many people struggle to keep the sound connected without straining or flipping into falsetto SLS uses a multitude of different consonant sounds that are designed to "trick" your voice to stay connected (Seth's words himself) without straining or flipping. Once you become very good at doing this you then take away the crutches and progress toward open vowels while maintaining the same degree of efficient connection in the voice.

Here is a great vid with Seth (the founder) and he explains his method best:

Because many teach it incorrectly and then people assume that is how it was intended to be taught. Also when most people criticize SLS they are actually referring to SS (brett manning) but SS is NOT SLS.

2 big mistakes I see many practitioners make in this method:

1. vocalizing at too low a volume

2. smoothly flipping into falsetto and thinking it is a connected sound when it isn't.

Pull out Singing For The Stars and Seth will tell you that

1. Yes you do need support

2. Not to do the exercises too softly.

3. Not to flip into falsetto.

nice post phil

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the "methods" all want same thing. it comes down to marketing. and marketing doesn't belong in singing. People see an angle and capitalize on the angle a phrase or word that makes them sound different then the other method. "I'm the open throat school, I'm the low larynx school I'm the chest voice school, 'm the hold your breathe school, Im the vocal athlete school, Im the bridging school, I;m the appoggio school, Im the head voice school, Im the old school.

Find balance in your voice and sensations that work for you who cares what school. what works for some doesn't work for others. I have been to many teachers some good at helping me, some not so much. The thing is to find the sensations that work for you. You could do a million and one exercises and blow threw them or you could do one that puts you in the right place to sing clearly up and down your range.

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Find balance in your voice and sensations that work for you who cares what school. what works for some doesn't work for others. I have been to many teachers some good at helping me, some not so much. The thing is to find the sensations that work for you. You could do a million and one exercises and blow threw them or you could do one that puts you in the right place to sing clearly up and down your range.

Yes, that basically sums it up right there. Take what works for you, and leave the rest.

I couldn't help but "lol" at some of Seth's comments in that video comparing "white singers" to "black singers".

He clearly made those comments in a time when you didn't have to worry about ruffling the feathers of the PC Police.

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