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Feeling Your Nasal Consonants

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loudkenny
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Hello all,

My name is loudkenny, and I´m a longtime lurker. I bought a copy of Four Pillars awhile back, and it´s very informative.

Right now I am working on breath support and resonant tracking with the three nasal consonants - /m/, /n/ and /ng/ (or ¨hum, hun and hung¨).

When I do the exercises, I feel the vibration in my mouth in various places. For example, when I do the ¨hum¨ I feel it all over the inside of my mouth, the ¨hun¨ mostly vibrates the roof of my mouth, and the ¨hung¨ I feel way in the back of my throat.

Am I doing these correctly?

The reason I´m asking is I read in many other books about the need to ¨resonate in the mask¨ for efficient singing, and supposedly this area is located right under and around your nose.

BTW... before anyone asks, the training vowel is ´eh´ :)

Happy Halloween and Thank you,

ken

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They should all vibrate around the front of your mouth, yes, in that "mask" area.

Based on that I would say be careful with the "ng", you might want to your tongue more forward on the roof of your mouth it so the back of the throat is more open and the sound isn't being pushed all the way back.

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i personally love the "ng" exercise but you need to understand why you are doing it.

this exercise is great because it trains proper positioning of vocal production and help relieve tension. it helps train to keep the voice up and out of the throat to maximize resonance and improve consistency of tone. it's also a nice, warm up and warm down move as well.

you aren't going to sing like that, but you want to imbed that set up. nice easy scales and sirens with this is just great.

be sure not to force or lean into it.. just let it happen.

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Ken,

you mentioned ...'The reason I´m asking is I read in many other books about the need to ¨resonate in the mask¨ for efficient singing, and supposedly this area is located right under and around your nose.'

I always smile :-) when I see a description like this. The fact is that efficient singing (good phonation and resonance) produces vocal sensations, not the other way around.

Also, for those singers who feel it (and not all good singers do), the effect is most localized when singing actual resonant (both bright and rich at the same time, good formant-tuned) vowels. Put another way, when the singing is correct, sensations (such as they are for the individual) will be most intense.

I hope this is helpful.

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Awesome, as usual, Steven. While a number of people may describe what is a sympathetic vibration, which is a side effect and not the cause of the right mechanics, not everyone will feel the same thing and it is important to realize that. They may pass right by what they need to do because they didn't feel exactly what someone else said. Another good reason to take a lesson or two or at least have a friend with good ears.

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Ken,

You are welcome to contact me at my personal email and I can help you. But I have to ask, have you watched the demonstration content and lectures in your copy of "The Four Pillars of Singing" regarding semi-occluded phonations? Have you watched the demonstration on "Establishing The Resonant Track"?

You definitely want to feel vibrations, tickling in your lips /m/, tongue /n/ and pharynx /ng/... as well as, depending on the individual, tickling in your nose or pressure behind the eyes... all of these sensations are a good sing. Mask it for sure!

Also, do NOT lean into the nasal consonants... beginners tend to add way too much weight and grind the glottis (vocal folds) when the first start out which beats you down quickly and hampers you opportunity to get off to a strong start with early success... make your nasal consonants light and "floaty"!!

Take a lesson with me or lets do a consultation call... see information below...

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Ken, lets agree to not call this "humming"... I think this is a mistake. Humming does not typically include resonant energy for most people. It can result in you doing this workout with an open glottis and not getting any compression... precisely NOT what you want out of these nasal consonants... Do NOT "hum"... "buzz"... I make that VERY clear in "The Four Pillars of Singing" demonstrations and lectures on this topic in the program.

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ok, Im teaching 10 hours today , staring in 20 minutes... give me about a day to get back to you Ken... glad to see that your reaching out to accept the help that is being offered to you... in the meantime, review the PDFs below if you are so inclined...

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