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Jaime Vendera's Transcending Tone, wow.

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prickstein
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So after many years and dollars spent on singing lessons and cd courses, I got the "Raise Your Voice" ebook a couple of weeks ago.

I did a week of the "Falsetto Slide" as suggested then moved on to the Transending Tone exercise.

All I can say is "WOW". It is the first exercise I have come across that has helped me establish the open throat sensation comfortably as well as being very aware of resonance.

I played a gig after about 2 days of doing the exercise and noticed a stark improvement straight away.

I do mostly backing vocals in this particular gig but I noticed that as soon as I opened my mouth to sing, I was a lot more open and resonant.

Parts I normally struggle with, where my voice usually flips between registers sat perfectly in the mix register and there was a lot less of the "grabbing" sensation that normally occurs for me that stops me from singing in tune in my midrange.

Thanks Jaime, I look forward to seeing what unfolds for me over the next few weeks/months/years.

Rick

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  • 3 weeks later...

So after doing the exercise after a few weeks, I'm noticing that when I swell to a louder volume around my break area, it seems to be guiding me to produce a note in a place that I've never been before.

Is this the mystical "middle" that I've been trying to find through SLS and SS type exercises?

By swelling into the notes, my larynx doesn't seem to be rising, which I struggled to keep down before.

It seems to be coming from a place where I can feel both head and chest resonance but is weaker than my old pulling chest sound, I assume it will get stronger in time.

When I get to full volume around my break, it still cracks/yodels every now and then but I feel the swallowing muscles causing this and I think my muscles are slowly starting to trust that they are not needed.

It's hard to break 20 years of bad habits.

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So after many years and dollars spent on singing lessons and cd courses, I got the "Raise Your Voice" ebook a couple of weeks ago.

I did a week of the "Falsetto Slide" as suggested then moved on to the Transending Tone exercise.

All I can say is "WOW". It is the first exercise I have come across that has helped me establish the open throat sensation comfortably as well as being very aware of resonance.

I played a gig after about 2 days of doing the exercise and noticed a stark improvement straight away.

I do mostly backing vocals in this particular gig but I noticed that as soon as I opened my mouth to sing, I was a lot more open and resonant.

Parts I normally struggle with, where my voice usually flips between registers sat perfectly in the mix register and there was a lot less of the "grabbing" sensation that normally occurs for me that stops me from singing in tune in my midrange.

Thanks Jaime, I look forward to seeing what unfolds for me over the next few weeks/months/years.

Rick

That's good to hear, Jamie's a good man.

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So after doing the exercise after a few weeks, I'm noticing that when I swell to a louder volume around my break area, it seems to be guiding me to produce a note in a place that I've never been before.

Is this the mystical "middle" that I've been trying to find through SLS and SS type exercises?

By swelling into the notes, my larynx doesn't seem to be rising, which I struggled to keep down before.

It seems to be coming from a place where I can feel both head and chest resonance but is weaker than my old pulling chest sound, I assume it will get stronger in time.

When I get to full volume around my break, it still cracks/yodels every now and then but I feel the swallowing muscles causing this and I think my muscles are slowly starting to trust that they are not needed.

It's hard to break 20 years of bad habits.

prickstein: Could be, by your description. Sounds like a breakthrough of vocal coordination, in any case.

Yes, it will get stronger, and mostly more secure and confident.

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prickstein: I wanted to make one other supportive comment related to your current experience. Do some recordings of yourself using this new coordination. You will discover that the sensations have some correlation to the sounds, but that the _feeling_ that you are between head and chest voice is not so apparent in the actual sound. It will just sound like you, singing well on that series of notes.

The sensations of 'head' and 'chest' and 'middle (or mix)' voice are just that... sensations. In that you can familiarize yourself with the feelings as you are singing well, and use those sensations as biofeedback confirmation that you are singing as you intend, they are very beneficial. For many centuries, that was all a singer had.

However, the sound out in the air, heard by the listener, is one of vocal consistency of color. They do not hear the 'head' and 'chest' things in the way that you feel them. They hear your voice, well-produced, clear, connected, communicating, free... enjoyable.

Congrats!

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Yes Prickstein - Jaime is great at that. I also teach a tone technique to ease the register breaks...it makes the voice much more smooth and healthily accessible between registers. A smooth flow through is what you are seeking! :cool:

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Yes Prickstein - Jaime is great at that. I also teach a tone technique to ease the register breaks...it makes the voice much more smooth and healthily accessible between registers. A smooth flow through is what you are seeking! :cool:

So how do I find out about your technique Hilary?

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You can find out about any voice coach or subject matter expert on the main site. go to members and run a search for their name... Vendera, Canto, Lugo, Fraser, Popeil, Rodman, Deva, Murray, Del Vecchio, Richards, Lunte, and SO MANY Other SMEs on The Modern Vocalist I cant even list them all. With TMV we have brought together to most amazing round table of experts in the world and its still growing! We are about the release some amazing new partnerships and features as well... see the main site.

Go to the main site and select "Members" , then look at "Featured Members".

In regards to trancending tone, at TVS we call it "calibration" and its used to work on developing and coordinating projected (falsettoy) vocal modes to twang modes .... and different degrees in between.... to get vocal fold adduction and amplify a 2-4kz frequency for full body head tones. Its a critical voice teaching tool to get singers to learn how to articulate their larynx configutations, important in extreme singing and head voice development. All the top teachers teach about 80% of the same "stuff", its just different languages and approaches/techniques to helping the student get the results... albeit, training full, connected head tones is one of the more rarities in the vocal pedagogy lexicon.

Steve: how is the TMV Rosetta Stone Project coming ?

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Thank you Robert & yes Prickstein......most courses by most teachers teach this. You need to find who you think is most suitable for your requirements. All the names including Robert & myself are worth checking out on their profile pages and go to their websites. If you need referees for courses...teachers will provide them for you. :cool: H

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  • 1 year later...

Transcending Tone is the worst exercise of all time! It's so hard and annoying to do. LOL. Nah, I love Jaime, he's incredible and his system WORKS!

Just out of curiosity, is there any exercise that is the "scale equivalent" of the transcending tone exercise?

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Transcending Tone is the worst exercise of all time! It's so hard and annoying to do. LOL. Nah, I love Jaime, he's incredible and his system WORKS!

Just out of curiosity, is there any exercise that is the "scale equivalent" of the transcending tone exercise?

Stan: There is an intermediate approach, which I would call (If I were naming it) the 'sloppy scale' :-)

With the same attitude of connection that you would use in the siren, sing a major scale with short siren-like feeling between the notes.

Actually, when singing a 'clean' scale, the siren slides happen instantaneously... but, they are still there.

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Awesome, thanks, Steven! I wouldn't consider that an "intermediate" approach...Jaime's exercise is almost aimed at experienced singers. What you do is you swell the voice from falsetto to full voice... but it's a lot harder than it sounds.

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Awesome, thanks, Steven! I wouldn't consider that an "intermediate" approach...Jaime's exercise is almost aimed at experienced singers. What you do is you swell the voice from falsetto to full voice... but it's a lot harder than it sounds.

hi stan.

stay with it, man.

transcending tone (a.k.a. messa di voce) is a staple exercise for me. i've been doing it for 7 mos. now starting at e4 to g4 and i still skip and bump and all that, (you know what i mean) but much less than when i first started it. yes..it can be frustrating, but there's so much residual benefit to doing it.

i have gotten so much benefit out of that exercise. if i was a voice instructor, and could only recommend one exercise for developing your voice, that would be it.

steve, wouldn't you agree?

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Stan, Bob: By 'intermediate', I did not mean between skill set levels, I meant between the 'sing this scale precisely', and 'sing a siren' approaches. I was thinking at the the time that 'transcending tone' was Jaime's siren exercise, but I was wrong.

Messa di voce is both a training exercise, and a tool for evaluation. Its musical objective, to start a note on a vowel in tune, swell it smoothly and then diminuendo it smoothly while staying in tune, is the basis of dynamic expression in singing. To be able to _do_ it, though, means that the singer be negotiating smoothly through changes in laryngeal muscle action and breath energy... a tall order for all singers, even the advanced.

In response to your direct question Bob, there are many prerequisite skills for the singer which are assembled together into the messa di voce, and other skills, for example, scale intonation and articulation, clarity of diction, vowel shaping & modification, etc., that deserve their own exercises. I would not want to do with just one. ;-)

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  • 3 weeks later...

I am practising this excersise myself, but i am doubtful about one thing. When i come to G4 and A4 my head voice starts and when i do this excersise it feels like i am only swelling in falsetto and it´s very weak. If i try in another way i pull chest and that´s not something i want to do of course. Will the full voice develop in time when swelling falsetto or am i doing it the wrong way? Posted an example so you can hear.

Thanx in advance/ Ola

http://www.box.net/shared/z7a9ebyp73

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I am practising this excersise myself, but i am doubtful about one thing. When i come to G4 and A4 my head voice starts and when i do this excersise it feels like i am only swelling in falsetto and it´s very weak. If i try in another way i pull chest and that´s not something i want to do of course. Will the full voice develop in time when swelling falsetto or am i doing it the wrong way? Posted an example so you can hear.

Thanx in advance/ Ola

http://www.box.net/shared/z7a9ebyp73

oh man, doing this in a4 is really hard. this is up there on the difficulty scale.

ola,

start playing with it at d and work up.

make sure you are thoroughly warmed up.

i'm still on his basic starting one, the soft to loud (i've got a ways to go).

here's mine full of skips and bumps (very far from perfect) but you can at least hear transtion as it kinda shifts 3 gears: light head, to stronger head, to a meaty head with some chesty sound and the most resonant.

the goal is to over time, eliminate the gears.

you're singing one note through a break.

remember it's supposed to be without any skips and bumps

the reason i like it so much is the challenge it imposes and i already feel residual benefit when i sing.

per jaime vendera, yay like in "hay"

http://www.box.net/shared/35fusdqdg1

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Hey bob, thanks for posting that example buddy. It shows how to do the exercise and also shows that people don't need to worry about posting less than perfect clips of themselves here...Unless you are Brett Manning! lol (KIDDING!)

I could certainly benefit from doing this exercise more so kudos for reminding me with your post. :)

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steve, regarding the short audio in post above, can i ask what specifically is the gear sounds you hear?

what am i failing to do i guess?

Bob: your ears and body are telling you the same thing that I hear... messa di voce on the A above mid c is not quite smooth yet.

Be patient. Jump back to G or F# where you can do it smoothly, and continue there. As you ascend into this more challenging range, do your crescendo more slowly, almost in slo-mo. its the way to discover the smoother registration changes.

All that said, you are not singing the most resonant vowel for that A. The MDV will be smoother if you do use it.

Another exercise you can do to discover the smoother transition is to do the MDV on a semi-occluded consonant, such as Z or voiced TH. Try those out.

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