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High head voice note (Potential E5?)

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Jabroni
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Hello all,

 

First off, great to see the new TMVW forum up and running. A great new interface!

 

I was practicing light head tones and I think I ended up figuring out how to transition around B4 and up.

 

I ended up recording what it sounded like with my phone so the quality's not so great, but the head tone sounds full and twangy. I think it ended up being an E5 (although I'm not sure).

 

Let me know what you guys think, any feedback is welcome.

 

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It was like a caged animal finally breaking the last piece of fence away.....then running around like a stripped ape. Well done lol. A little more twang and closure, then you will be posting a cover of shes gone ha ha.

 

Thanks  :D Yes, Definitely some more closure, but I was surprised after hearing it that it was so loud and full. Hearing oneself is deceiving without a recording or amplification for playback purposes.

 

She's Gone... Hall and Oates?

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Shes gone by steelheart;) gotta try out your new found head voice lol. Plus its a great test for that lovely break there. You will be surprised how fast you build that area up now that you found it. Now that you discovered the shedding of weight your body will adjust quickly. Once your body feels balance it just runs with it.

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Shes gone by steelheart;) gotta try out your new found head voice lol. Plus its a great test for that lovely break there. You will be surprised how fast you build that area up now that you found it. Now that you discovered the shedding of weight your body will adjust quickly. Once your body feels balance it just runs with it.

 

Wow... that song would be tough :)

 

I am surprised that what that E5 sounds like on a recording is completely different than from what I hear or feel. The voice feels so "small" and doesn't sound as boomy, but after hearing my recording I'm definitely in the right place. The hard part is the transition area around B4. For me, it is much more noticeable than the "bridge" around E4.

 

I'll keep working that, looking forward to making more progress.

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It does take some time to get the brain to understand(well the conscious side at least, the sub conscious is like duh dumbass thats what i been saying lol) that so little makes so much. It will get a little boomier and you will feel a little more once you increase closure and twang. It still wont be super loud to your inner hearing though. But you will be annoying the neighbors and not realize it with the soundwaves ha ha.

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You cannot hear yourself the way that others hear you. It's a fact whether anyone happens to like that, or not. And yes, high notes are not necessarily boomy or whatever other spoken or theoretical criteria and are still full and useful.

 

Stuff like this leads me to believe that singing is mental.

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Update:

 

I took 3 more recordings of my higher head voice, around the same region (D5 - E5) as before.

 

I tried to add more compression to them... I think the 3rd one has the best compression: it sounds the "boomiest".

 

Let me know what you guys think, thanks.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hey, pretty interesting what you have broken through to.

I have a suggestion on what to do next, to go to the next step of usability of these tones...

Downward sirens.

Then, legato 2-octave arpeggios, up and down, starting on G2, with vibrato on each note, transposing upward by semitones.

The most telling of these arpeggios will be those that cross the first, and not quite the second transition. That would be the 2-octaves beginning on Bb2, and then upward beginning on the next 6 half steps.

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What's the trick?  How do you navigate that bridge?

 

I've been able to hit Eb5 on a good day, but I realized that I'm really just pushing my B4/C5 up and raising my larynx.  (Not the right way.)  I figured there must be some "shift" that I'm not doing to break through.

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What's the trick?  How do you navigate that bridge?

 

I've been able to hit Eb5 on a good day, but I realized that I'm really just pushing my B4/C5 up and raising my larynx.  (Not the right way.)  I figured there must be some "shift" that I'm not doing to break through.

What vowels are we talking about?

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What's the trick?  How do you navigate that bridge?

 

I've been able to hit Eb5 on a good day, but I realized that I'm really just pushing my B4/C5 up and raising my larynx.  (Not the right way.)  I figured there must be some "shift" that I'm not doing to break through.

 

I switch to more of an "uh" vowel, which helps raise the soft palette and the back of the tongue as well. That really helps me get past B4 and take it up to E5.

 

What I was playing around with yesterday was a lighter configuration, and I finally got a light B4 to phonate without drastically changing the vowel like I am doing here. It was light and effortless almost like falsetto, but it had more mass and body behind it. This is the sound I am looking for. If I can get one today I'll record and post it here.

 

With the head tones I posted here, I feel like I'm taking chest voice musculature with me, so it feels more "belty", more of an opera-ish sound. A lot of abdominal movement as well on these chesty head tones.

 

The positive is that since now I know what both sensations are like, I can employ both of them in my singing and continue to practice both.

 

Steve, Thanks for the tips!

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What vowels are we talking about?

 

Not sure what you're asking.

 

To clarify, I'm conscious of the change in positioning / shape / resonance as I move through the first passaggio. And I prepare for that in order to navigate.  But it seems when I get to C5 and up, all I'm doing is pushing, and/or raising the larynx.  If there is another "shift" that I should be doing to more effortlessly go higher, I haven't figured it out.

 

I've played around with the shift to "uh", but I must not be doing it right, since it doesn't feel like it helps the same with shifting to "aw" in the first bridge does.

 

Or perhaps, my cords just don't want to go higher.  And no 'shaping' is going to get me up any higher.

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Ok, fair enough.

The issues with this upper transition are going to persist if the wrong vowel mods and embouchure are used. Going toward UH only does part of it...note-by-note it has to be just the right vowel shade, which you will probably have to determine experimentally.

If there is a vocal weight issue, then evaluate the pushing habit to determine the point in the scale where it is appearing... And re-work that section with gentle sirens on ee and oo. Those vowels have very low first formants, so you will get over the first bridge at comparatively low notes for them.

Then, once you have the ability to sing both ee and oo 'on-top- of the first transition in the context of the siren, like, on Ab4, you begin gliding between them...back and forth on a single note, maintaining the coordination. You will discover how much alike the ee and oo are acoustically, not much tongue motion required to change from one to the other.

Then, on that Ab, onset an ee in this upper coordination, and glide it to IH as in 'mit' and back to ee with a consistent coordination. Do the same with oo to oe ( as in look ) And back to Oo.

The next vowel to add in the two series are Eh, and oh., so the ee series is ee, ih, eh, ih, ee. The oo series is oo, oe, oh, oe, oo. In both cases, your goal,is to smoothly transition vowels while maintaining the coordination.

The pattern then converges on ah from each direction. You can either do it from each end, or join the two series Together: ee, ih, eh, ah, oh, oe, oo, with smooth transitions.

When you can do that on the Ab, transpose to A natural, and repeat the entire cycle, beginning with the ee and oo sirens.

When A is well-in-hand, Bb.

When Bb is good, then I think you will have little trouble tweaking the vowels for the B.

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