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Love These Vocals!

 

Rob Halford Was GREAT! 

 

"Screaming For Vengeance"

 

 

 

1:15 - 1:30 - Amazing Edging skills here. Lots of twang compression and guiding the resonant energy and sound color right to the forward, hard palette to make it sound more "metal" or brighter. Not a lot of jaw movement through this passage, and thats great! Halford is very efficient with the embouchure throughout this song... 

 

3:56 - 3:59, another great moment with good, tight edging pops right to the front of the hard palette.

 

You also have to appreciate his ability to interpret the lyrics and get into character. This is great character and theater in my opinion. With just a look in the eye and mouth, he makes it looks masculine and tough... Poise!  Instead of getting all spastic on stage... Love the way Halford struts on stage and keeps a very loose posture all the time.. his cool walk is not just to be cool, but it is great for keeping the body from tensing up.

 

Thoughts?

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Halford is a great singer, though the stylistic choices I've heard him use sound more comical than "badass" to me. He's really unique, though. I realise saying this is like taking a shot at a religion.

 

My favourite song by Priest by far is One Shot at Glory:

 

 

And I'd love to hear someone like Jorn Lande, Daniel Heiman or even Bruce Dickinson singing it. I don't know how to describe it technique-wise, but to me it seems that his top register is too separated from his bottom, meaning he sounds way too thin in the higher register. Now I know the notes he's hitting are crazy high, but since I've heard that it's totally possible to hit the notes with a better tone I'm surprised why Halford's in such a high esteem.

 

It might be due to the character he's created, and the way he's carried himself through Priest's career. The fact that he's gay makes it even more cool.

 

No real input on the vocal technique, though.

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Halford is a great singer, though the stylistic choices I've heard him use sound more comical than "badass" to me. He's really unique, though. I realise saying this is like taking a shot at a religion.

 

My favourite song by Priest by far is One Shot at Glory:

 

 

And I'd love to hear someone like Jorn Lande, Daniel Heiman or even Bruce Dickinson singing it. I don't know how to describe it technique-wise, but to me it seems that his top register is too separated from his bottom, meaning he sounds way too thin in the higher register. Now I know the notes he's hitting are crazy high, but since I've heard that it's totally possible to hit the notes with a better tone I'm surprised why Halford's in such a high esteem.

 

It might be due to the character he's created, and the way he's carried himself through Priest's career. The fact that he's gay makes it even more cool.

 

No real input on the vocal technique, though.

 

Blashpemy for sure!  I don't hear Halford as "disconnected"... if I do , its not a problem for me... love that sound... 

 

This is so cool... old school Priest before the leather... this is great singing... listen to this, lots of great tone and connectedness.

 

Full concert in silk bell bottoms!  Im a flaming heterosexual... but I agree, its kinda cool that he's gay... I don't know why... it just is for some reason... but thats not important to anything.

 

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Halford is a great singer, though the stylistic choices I've heard him use sound more comical than "badass" to me. He's really unique, though. I realise saying this is like taking a shot at a religion.

 

My favourite song by Priest by far is One Shot at Glory:

 

">

 

And I'd love to hear someone like Jorn Lande, Daniel Heiman or even Bruce Dickinson singing it. I don't know how to describe it technique-wise, but to me it seems that his top register is too separated from his bottom, meaning he sounds way too thin in the higher register. Now I know the notes he's hitting are crazy high, but since I've heard that it's totally possible to hit the notes with a better tone I'm surprised why Halford's in such a high esteem.

 

It might be due to the character he's created, and the way he's carried himself through Priest's career. The fact that he's gay makes it even more cool.

 

No real input on the vocal technique, though.

The thing is this guy basicly created metal, so comparing him to alot of others is pointless. A monstrous voice and an iconic style, released at just exactly right time has given him a welldeserved legendary status.

guys like jorn or daniel heiman despite being my favourite singers of all times doesnt really play in the same league.

Also the things he doe with his voice i would say is more a choice, yes he has a big distinction between his belts and headvoice. Listen to his earlyer material it was more like onevocalcolor, however those sounds are not what he was famous for.

Personaly i love those choices when metalsingers go for those more screamy piercing highs than the more roary stuff. Both are cool but people tend to forget they are choices :)

Cheers

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Yes, if you watch the other video of Halford in the "Sad Wings of Destiny" and "Exciter" years... its more connected and "one voice"... but for peats sake,.. its clear that this song, "Screaming for Vengeance", is not a song for "one voice" per se... its called "Screaming for Vengeance"... it should be screamy all the way through... Love the way Halford uses the top end on screams... if you want to hear more lyrical and connected singing... check out the tracks from "Sad Wings of Destiny" and "Exciter"... earlier albums.

 

Anyone that is entertaining any doubts about Rob Halford, needs to listen to this.

 

Dreamer Deceiver

 

;)

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The thing is this guy basicly created metal, so comparing him to alot of others is pointless.

 

Halford's contributions to the genre are significant but, sorry, it is a well known fact that Heavy Metal was invented on the guitar (meaning a Gibson) by Tony Iommi  with this riff. Hey, check me out .....winding down Christmas 2014 with a few Sabbath videos!

 

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Halford's contributions to the genre are significant but, sorry, it is a well known fact that Heavy Metal was invented on the guitar (meaning a Gibson) by Tony Iommi  with this riff. Hey, check me out .....winding down Christmas 2014 with a few Sabbath videos!

 

 

I always find that one funny, cause it's so blues. That tritone interval. I find the phrygian interval (symphony of destruction, Jaws, etc) is more isolated in metal and rarely featured in a lot of the black roots kind of music prior. Of course all of them were featured classically through more traditional western composition. 

 

On Halford, I compare him to Michaelangelo (painter). Sure, Michaelangelo's painted women looked like dudes with tits bolted on. Lots of fancy schmancy 21st century college educated painters could with the advances of science, and modern civilization outmatch make more 'realistic' depictions.

 

But you know what? Michaelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sistine_Chapel

 

He sculpted the statue of David:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_%28Michelangelo%29

 

In the 1,500s. Sure a lot of kids with a modern anatomy booklet (not invented yet, sorry guys, Michaelangelo had to spend a lot of years in the morgue to learn male anatomy first hand) could point out anatomy weaknesses. Talk about how overrated the guy was.

 

And a lot of people with modern vocal instruction can find some scientific way he could  'he could made those high notes thicker.' Halford started in 1969. As far as I know, was a huge innovator in this style of singing. If it wasn't for guys like him, you probably wouldn't have your instruction booklets to tell you how to make your notes thicker. Halford did it without instruction booklets, in those dark ages prior to the internet, where pretty much anything that wasn't classical was often frowend upon by most educated singing teachers.

 

High note are by far not my favorite part of singing, but I salute the guy. I also like the variety in his voice. How he doesn't always seem to be trying to hit the thickest high note the possibly can. As a singer maybe it's exciting to be up for a 'technical challenge in their bodies' but as a listener, its like a guitar player that constantly shreds. They're having fun pushing their fingers to the limit, but 90 percent of the time, I'm not going to listen to it. Just because an activity is more physically demanding, doesn't mean it sounds any better.

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I'm just sort of trying to have a little fun with the discussion. The Sabbath retort is usually the one I use for anyone who says Cream or Hendrix were the first metal acts. It's something people like to say but my response is.....sure those guys were loud but they lacked the DOOM! And the Tri-tone! Nothing sounds more metal than a flatted fifth imo. The SONG has to be heavy metal.....marshall stacks don't get you there for free.

   I also think Glenn Hughes deserves some credit for being years ahead of the pack with this little gem from 1970. At about the 4:45 mark he lets out the banshee wail that really seems to foreshadow things to come in the world of rock vocals. Can't think of any recorded examples before this of this kind of blatant, biting upper register stuff. Even though it's brief. And Robert Plant doesn't count. For me his approach was different.....nuanced, beautiful, one of a kind but different nonetheless.

    My love of Trapeze is sincere by the way. This is a great album through and through....

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oq-ksK7iFUk

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Halford's contributions to the genre are significant but, sorry, it is a well known fact that Heavy Metal was invented on the guitar (meaning a Gibson) by Tony Iommi with this riff. Hey, check me out .....winding down Christmas 2014 with a few Sabbath videos!

">

Note to self: Never use figures of speech ;)

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Like I said: it's like taking a shot at a religion. Or a cult. Pointless. :) I think he sounds comical. I think Dani Filth sounds comical. And that dude from metal church. And accept. And Acdc. No real input on vocal technique, though. And like Jens said: it must be more of a choice he's making than lack of technique.

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Ozzie vs Halford? C'mon? Halford sends Ozzy back home to mamma...

What is with this attitude against a twangy head tone scream ? Us bottom up training mania so prevalent that we can't even appreciate or enjoy a good old fashioned twangy scream without "grounded" chest resonance ?

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I guess the thin, piercing head voice way of singing went out of style by the dawn of the '90s. A lot of modern hard rock singers appear to have grown up idolizing Dio and Dickinson rather than Halford and so, their style seems to be based more around belting.

 

Anyway, Rob and his band will always be legends. I'm much more fond of their '70s output, both in terms of the music and the vocals than anything they did 'British Steel' onwards.

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I watched that documentary by Dunn, essentially, an anthropological study of heavy metal and the roots thereof. And it seems there is no one thing but there are more gradual transitions from the classical chamber and orchestra music to what we call heavy metal. Problem is, there are many sub-genres depending what you like in the lyrics, or even album to album. They try to classify JP as power metal, as opposed to grunge metal, all the cores,

 

Most every singer saw Rob as the ideal, at least for a powerful range. Others admired Dio for the D&D lyrics and the broad tone that he had. Halford could sing way higher but that's not the point. Each did what his voice did well, with lots of practice, of course.

 

I read the history of Judas Priest. How does Halford become the Metal God? Divine right of kings, evidently. No extensive musical education, no singing lessons. In fact, he was a bit of a loner, battling personal problems he felt no one else could identify with.

 

As for the evolution of sound and look, I think the ability of Halford as a singer brought out something in Tipton and Downing and that caused their music to change.

 

As for the flowing gossamer clothing before Sad Wings of Destiny, well, other popular bands, including Black Sabbath, were wearing similar stuff. The shift to leather was not so much a shift as it was Halford becoming more comfortable as an adult with his own personal life, which included his own taste in clothing, which including the leather and metal pieces. They saw that the audience responded well to this and soon, the whole band is wearing leather.

 

Halford is a good example that you don't need genetic blessing to be a good singer. He has a receding chin, He is not a large guy in any dimension. But what he does well is alignment. The body is a musical instrument and he plays it as one. He doesn't have the classic looks of a "singer." Which should prove there is no "singer" look or construction.

 

As for his evolution of a singer, I think things changed in Sad Wings of Destiny and even more so in British Steel. Before SWoD, he was singing high all the time, a sonic blast in the 5th octave. By the time of British Steel, he had learned that while you can sing everything high all the time, the audience cannot. Nor can they understand the lyrics. So, he learned to bring the verses down to where humans can hear and sing along and save the choruses for the notes only dogs can hear. That made the music more approachable by others and also more commercially successful.

 

Although, like Khassera says, preferences are highly personal, and that is also okay. For example, my favorite singer is Robert Plant, in spite of his faults.

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Funny... as if there is something wrong with just screaming a high note that doesn't sound like chest grounding... you don't have to make a choice, learn how to do both... as Halford did... opinions are fine... but this attitude that you have to make a choice with the two different had voice sounds is ridiculous in my view. People agreeing to not giving themselves choices in sound color, ... some influential individuals have done a great job bamboozling the consumer on this point.

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It's been really good, but this week I caught a chest cold again, so I've been doing breathing exercises only. I can't adjust to the humidity of England and it's taking its toll.

 

I did hit the highest notes on "The Hero" workout, though, with a really bright open tone!

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Rob Halford was one of my vocal heroes growing up, and I've made somewhat a study of his voice and technique.

Rob is a high mix singer most of the time (being a high baritone), but when he ventures past B5 he employs a good deal of pharyngeal twang. This "over the top" twang results in that "cackly" high end voice you hear on things like "Screaming for Vengeance", "Painkiller", "Beyond the Realms of Death", "Freewheel Burning" , "Dissdent Aggressor", "Sinner". He is not able to mix in a good amount of mouth resonance in his upper range, so the end result is a more hard palate, sinus resonance sound. I employ this same sound for my notes above B5 in more aggressive songs.

The advantage Halford had was his ability to add rasp/distortion to this pharyngeal twang. It's a rather unique sound and was unheard of in the mid 70's. Emulating Halfords top end is how I learned pharyngeal head resonance in my late teens; though I had no idea that's what it was called.

You can really this technique in the isolated vocal track:

 

------

Geoff Tate employed the same pharyngeal twang, but in a less aggressive manner. Tate's resonance blend was titlted back toward the soft palate, resulting in a head twang sound more "hooty" or "rounded".

Music, like art, food or comedy, is subjective to individual. Some find Halfords top end "comical", others like myself and Rob find it inspiring.

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Oh ya... "The Hero"... what a great workout... this is fantastic for learning to narrow vowels and work on "throat shaping" vowels, or articulating these vowels inside a more narrowed embouchure with minimum jaw movement.  Here is a demonstration of me doing it, forgive me for the distorted audio, we fixed that problem since then. BTW, that top note is an F5, if you are having a good day and can nail that, great... good for you! 

 

When I film another demonstration of this, I will lower the acoustic overload... although it sounds cool, this level of acoustic overload (mass) is probably too much for the demonstration... but Im just being nick picky from a product production and trying to be a good teacher perspective.

 

 

Send me a file of you doing this, Id be happy to give you some feedback as my client.

 

Anyways, I don't want to digress from the topic too much here... 

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Rob Halford was one of my vocal heroes growing up, and I've made somewhat a study of his voice and technique.

Rob is a high mix singer most of the time (being a high baritone), but when he ventures past B5 he employs a good deal of pharyngeal twang. This "over the top" twang results in that "cackly" high end voice you hear on things like "Screaming for Vengeance", "Painkiller", "Beyond the Realms of Death", "Freewheel Burning" , "Dissdent Aggressor", "Sinner". He is not able to mix in a good amount of mouth resonance in his upper range, so the end result is a more hard palate, sinus resonance sound. I employ this same sound for my notes above B5 in more aggressive songs.

The advantage Halford had was his ability to add rasp/distortion to this pharyngeal twang. It's a rather unique sound and was unheard of in the mid 70's. Emulating Halfords top end is how I learned pharyngeal head resonance in my late teens; though I had no idea that's what it was called.

You can really this technique in the isolated vocal track:

 

------

Geoff Tate employed the same pharyngeal twang, but in a less aggressive manner. Tate's resonance blend was titlted back toward the soft palate, resulting in a head twang sound more "hooty" or "rounded".

Music, like art, food or comedy, is subjective to individual. Some find Halfords top end "comical", others like myself and Rob find it inspiring.

 

 

 

Geoff Tate employed the same pharyngeal twang, but in a less aggressive manner. Tate's resonance blend was titlted back toward the soft palate, resulting in a head twang sound more "hooty" or "rounded".

 

Kevin great post... I think this is an insightful point in regards to that great, Early Geoff Tate sound... 

 

Great to have you here brother... and I know I speak for everyone when I say, we hope you will stick around and contribute more often... I bumped your title to "SME"... 

 

Kevin Richards... very knowledgable and top line voice coach... 

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