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Weak Vocals in The Morning & After Rehearsal

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greg6699
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Hi to all,

 

This is my first post so hello to everyone, I joined this group as I sing in the rock band and I have some daughts about my voice.

Problem appears in the morning ( every morning my voice is weaker than night before when I sing strongly and high.), also next day after band rehearsal or gig my voice isn't strong enough to let me sing the same set of songs. I would like to be able to sing like three gigs day by day without a break.. If my throat wasn't strong I wouldn't say anything but I'm capable of singing some Toto or Queensryche songs but next day it's impossible to repeat the same gig... Any advices guys?

Thank you very much for any help...

Greg

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Greg,

 

A lot of people will read this and the first thing they will likely say to themselves is, "... why is that unusual? Welcome to the sport of singing...". That is my first "gut" reaction. Bro, it takes me and most people a good 20-30 minutes to get warmed up into your singing voice and the most challenging time arguably is first thing in the morning... and if you want to pile on the challenge... try that after screaming Queensryche songs the previous night... This is a formula for having a clunky voice in the morning... BUT... it doesn't have to be that way... Thus, an answer to your question...

 

The 2nd thing that comes to my mind is, "... is this guy training"?  Greg, are you involved or practicing any vocal warm-ups before you sing? Do you have content; book, audio files, etc... that you can use to warm-up, and beyond that... train/practice to build strength in your voice? Because the bigger picture here is... you probably need a lot of strengthening and coordination work to ask your voice to be more responsive under those conditions... a LOT.  You need to train... You need to practice and workout... outside of singing with your band. And let me tell you, pretty much everyone does... to one degree or another.  If you are not training your voice... and you think that one day your going to wake up in the morning and your voice is going to be happy and ready to go again... your delusional and naive about how the voice and singing works. Im just giving it to you straight. So... until you decide to get more serious about what your doing and start training your voice, it is far more likely that your voice is going to have more problems as time goes on, not less.

 

So lets start by answering that important question... 

 

Coincidentally, I just added this fun little video to my YouTube channel:

 

 

 

BTW... please upload a picture to your profile to help us to make the forum look cool and to give yourself some identity in here. Thanks... 

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Mornings are almost always tough, it's a fairly universal thing with almost every singer.

 

Based on what you're describing, it sounds like you are probably a singer who has gotten great at delivering a great sound through brute force, but you'll need some training to learn how to produce similar sounds in a healthier manner that causes less damage and thus increases your stamina. So I would echo what Rob suggested - train. One on one with a coach is best form of training by a long shot - well worth the added price because it will be tailored individually to you and you'll get quicker results that way. To overcome the morning issues, occasionally schedule some of your lessons in the morning to work on that specifically.
 

Also, our forum member ronws, who seems to have read everything about every singer under the sun, notes an important trend - the pros are always recommending these voice saving tips:

-do what it is your voice can do, don't do what it can't.

-rest

-hydration

 

I would add that training can greatly improve what your voice can do, rest includes both sleep and the occasional vocal rest (doesn't have to be complete silence, just plan days off from singing and excess speaking), and the worse your technique is, the more hydration and rest you need to prevent damage.

Lastly, warming up is a smart idea and helps a whole lot of singers sing better and longer. You'd think the added time singing would subtract from your stamina, but when you warm up correctly (gradually), it actually extends your stamina by helping your voice find healthier technique and sit in that zone more consistency throughout the gig - basically prepares your voice to sing in a way that will help you get the most hours out of it
 

Make sure you're doing all of that and you'll be on a good track to improving. Hope that helps.

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Owen is right about the advice of pro singers. I have a head full of useless trivia. But one could amend that to note that of the singers interviewed that all said that same thing, they also had some training or warm-up regimen.

 

Geoff Tate works on high stuff for about 30 mins to an hour in the morning. A bit of mid-range in the afternoon. Low stuff about an hour before show time.

 

John Bush will spend most of an hour warming up with a specific set of exercises and breath management before engaging in the unholy growl that he has.

 

Ron Keel studied with Elizabeth Sabine.

 

Dee Snider was trained in high school as an actual countertenor.

 

Joe Lynn Turner took lessons. His dad said, "If this is going to be your job, you should train and educate yourself for it, like you would for a trade, like a plumber or electrician."

 

Bruce Dickinson practices breath management and resonance. He can be seen walking around back stage about an hour before showtime, humming and grinning maniacally, causing concerned looks from others.

 

And see, that's another thing, you can probably reduce the amount of "clunky morning voice" by warming down after a show. Light, almost falsetto descending slides. They will help your voice re-calibrate.

 

Also, what is not mentioned is how much sleep you are getting between the end of the show and the singing bit the next morning. Rest is the singer's secret weapon, along with how much water you had 8 to 12 hours before a gig.

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Thank you very much for all answers, I've always knew that GIFT is not everything, I heard that I have to warm this up and down after singing, but never trully thought about this seriously as I had rehearsals like once a week maybe less so I stupidly ignored that important things that you're describing guys.. really glad to join you..

Let me put all your thoughts together and get around them....  If don't mind, I'll get back to you to make sure I've chosen the right plan for training my voice...

 

Let me just ask you about proper food and drinks that I should eat or should't eat as it's important too.. Maybe that's one of the things that I do wrong...

 

Much appreciate your help and time spent..

 

Greg

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Two things...

Warm 'down' after a set, and a gig. Use the straw or semi-occluded voiced consonants.

After warmdown...silence.

Ok, 3 things...

After the gig, nice, long warmdown...10 mins, and then do not talk loudly after. If you go to a party, resist the temptation to 'Speak over' other talkers, and avoid whispering.

Long/hard singing really works the vocal bands. In a concert, up to 500,000 oscillations, or more. They swell up a bit after, but that can be ameliorated somewhat with the warm downs.

Vocal thickness in the am is partly muscular. The word for the fluid accumulation in the bands is 'edema'. This typically will not decrease until 2 hours after arising. So, take an early walk to listen to tunes you are learning, and take a bottle of water, and do very light sirens and perhaps light onsets on closed vowels to assess your situation.

I hope this is helpful.

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Thank you very much for all answers, I've always knew that GIFT is not everything, I heard that I have to warm this up and down after singing, but never trully thought about this seriously as I had rehearsals like once a week maybe less so I stupidly ignored that important things that you're describing guys.. really glad to join you..

Let me put all your thoughts together and get around them....  If don't mind, I'll get back to you to make sure I've chosen the right plan for training my voice...

 

Let me just ask you about proper food and drinks that I should eat or should't eat as it's important too.. Maybe that's one of the things that I do wrong...

 

Much appreciate your help and time spent..

 

Greg

 

When the band gets together, do they just launch into the song? No. The drummer checks his tuning, Maybe runs through the intro of "I can feel it in the air tonight." The guitar player checks his tuning, runs through a bit of "Smoke on the Water." He doesn't always just pick it up and launch in the "Eruption," though he could at a moment's notice if really pressed. It's okay for you to test your tuning and run through a simpler line just to ensure you are flexible and in good shape.

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