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Metallica - Wherever I May Roam (Cover Sample)

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etekiller
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Hi guys,

 

In one of the threads I've posted that I have a lot of trouble in singing to instrumental/karaoke versions of songs.

 

I said that I will post a sample of my singing for you to tell me how can I improve. Instead of posting it there, although I got amazing support in that thread, I decided to do it here, maybe more people will be inclined to leave a tip or two :).

 

I know that I am sometimes not in key, I will have to work on that. What also bothers me is the fact, that it sounds a little bit artificial. Without life.

 

Here's the recording (singing starts at around 0:26):

https://soundcloud.com/pe-ter/wimr/s-8lUF9

 

I will be grateful for some tips.

 

Thank you!

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I'd put some reverb on that vocal. When it's with the tracking it sounds very stiff in the track.

 

One little tip I've got, is I have a friend who grew up like many of us did with James Hetfield. We tried to get him to sing a song, and the song included likes of eyes, cries, sighs, etc. He literally could not sustain a long i vowel to save his life. eye yeeeeee.  Sigh yeeeee. Myeeeeee. Dieyeeeee!!!

 

So I know James does it all the time and if you want it stylistically you should go with it. But don't let it become a habit. So early on in your training try to find a sustained point in the vowel that depicts it. There's a little spot in the vowel before it becomes a full eeee sound, which can be sung and depict it pretty well.

 

Overall, it isn't perfect yet, obviously, but it's not too bad either. It's a little pointy in the mix. I think James uses a 'tiny' bit more air and less pure twang, with a slightly more open throat (5-10 percent of a yawn maybe)? He also modifies towards 'ay' a lot. So if you start with that vowel (yay, hey), and lean into other vowels kind of like that is a 'home base' vowel, you couild get closer. Ultimately, you'll probably just want to sing your own style.

 

He's not a technical virtuouso, and there is no need to copy him, necessarily, but it could give you a bit of something to toy with as you train.

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Thank you very much. I try to copy artists first before creating my own style. I need a base, few styles that I can use and later mold my own style from them. I did that in rap because it was too hard to start with my own style right away. So I am keeping an eye on that and I will try to kill any noticeable influence as soon as I get a good grasp of singing techniques.

 

Can I ask you whether you know any tutorials on youtube that could instruct me on vocal techniques used in Rock? I've heard that there are some little tricks that help people develop that angry/agressive voice.

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Thank you very much. I try to copy artists first before creating my own style. I need a base, few styles that I can use and later mold my own style from them. I did that in rap because it was too hard to start with my own style right away. So I am keeping an eye on that and I will try to kill any noticeable influence as soon as I get a good grasp of singing techniques.

 

Can I ask you whether you know any tutorials on youtube that could instruct me on vocal techniques used in Rock? I've heard that there are some little tricks that help people develop that angry/agressive voice.

 

To be honest, I would start with just 'generic vocal technique' prior to jumping into the serious aggresive and angry styles for at least a bit. I know some singers here, even with a really long history of singing, tried rasp advice from other singers, and it didn't work out. I think it was Ronws. So you really need to take that stuff with a grain of salt.

 

There are multiple ways of getting that anger/aggressive tone. Some of them like twanging with a lot of compression in the voice, have been measured to occur more likely at the false folds of the voice. Others seemed to potentially come more from the real folds. The ones that come from the real folds can potentially be damaging if done incorrectly.

 

It's not that it can't be done healthily, but it's pretty tricky and having a good solid foundation of the vowel placement, breath control, and tone is an easier baseline that doesn't tire you, strain or anything is a good base line without having a teacher.

 

I get rasp in a way that doesn't tire me and I also like the sound of, it's kind of like a weird vowel shift that I hit (I'd recommend playing around with vowels for everyone), it helps to twang, it helps if the larynx is a bit higher, there seems to be an alteration in compression or air flow, and it sounds best if there is a bit of plaintive thing too. For me it's a complex interaction that I probably couldn't articulate for an advanced singer that skillfully, much less someone who isn't highly experienced in a way that they could safely apply.

 

So when you are ready to pursue it. My best advice, is to not brute force it. If it hits you wrong, change your approach.I've had rasp sensations that felt plain bad. The key would be to not repeat ones that feel bad. And search for something that doesn't cause any hoarseness or strain.

 

One of the qualified teachers like Rob, Daniel Formica, or also Felipe would have better skill and advice and if you don't find something comfortable that works for you. Someone with a proven history of teaching rasp would be really good to seek out. I know how to do it in a way that feels bad, so I know it's possible. And I'm trying to help you while looking out for you too.

 

For me at least, there seems to be more than one component involved and the stars align in a way that I don't go hoarse. There's a little bit of a buzzing sensation above my larynx. Even with a teacher, you'll have ot listen to your body. If I know how to do it in a way that feels bad. It doesn't necessarily 'sound' that different from the one that feels good (feels higher in my throat, rather than lower). Even a trained expert, might not be able to judge your body. You've got to be really aware of it.

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To be honest, I would start with just 'generic vocal technique' prior to jumping into the serious aggresive and angry styles for at least a bit. I know some singers here, even with a really long history of singing, tried rasp advice from other singers, and it didn't work out. I think it was Ronws. So you really need to take that stuff with a grain of salt.

 

There are multiple ways of getting that anger/aggressive tone. Some of them like twanging with a lot of compression in the voice, have been measured to occur more likely at the false folds of the voice. Others seemed to potentially come more from the real folds. The ones that come from the real folds can potentially be damaging if done incorrectly.

 

It's not that it can't be done healthily, but it's pretty tricky and having a good solid foundation of the vowel placement, breath control, and tone is an easier baseline that doesn't tire you, strain or anything is a good base line without having a teacher.

 

I get rasp in a way that doesn't tire me and I also like the sound of, it's kind of like a weird vowel shift that I hit (I'd recommend playing around with vowels for everyone), it helps to twang, it helps if the larynx is a bit higher, there seems to be an alteration in compression or air flow, and it sounds best if there is a bit of plaintive thing too. For me it's a complex interaction that I probably couldn't articulate for an advanced singer that skillfully, much less someone who isn't highly experienced in a way that they could safely apply.

 

So when you are ready to pursue it. My best advice, is to not brute force it. If it hits you wrong, change your approach.I've had rasp sensations that felt plain bad. The key would be to not repeat ones that feel bad. And search for something that doesn't cause any hoarseness or strain.

 

One of the qualified teachers like Rob, Daniel Formica, or also Felipe would have better skill and advice and if you don't find something comfortable that works for you. Someone with a proven history of teaching rasp would be really good to seek out. I know how to do it in a way that feels bad, so I know it's possible. And I'm trying to help you while looking out for you too.

 

For me at least, there seems to be more than one component involved and the stars align in a way that I don't go hoarse. There's a little bit of a buzzing sensation above my larynx. Even with a teacher, you'll have ot listen to your body. If I know how to do it in a way that feels bad. It doesn't necessarily 'sound' that different from the one that feels good (feels higher in my throat, rather than lower). Even a trained expert, might not be able to judge your body. You've got to be really aware of it.

 

Great, thanks for warning me too, it's a crucial piece of advice. One thing that helps me out in understanding what you say about those feelings you get is the fact that for the last few years I've been using my voice in various ways, that was always my passion. Singing, rapping, being a radio host. I've even been a telemarketer for a year. I used to do some voice-over work. I worked in dubbing. That job requires you to change your voice very significantly. So that no one would recognize you only by listening to you. It made me aware of my vocal cords.

 

This might make it more safe for me to try the things you're talking about. I'm very grateful for your tips. You and MDEW really help me out on these Forums.

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Great, thanks for warning me too, it's a crucial piece of advice. One thing that helps me out in understanding what you say about those feelings you get is the fact that for the last few years I've been using my voice in various ways, that was always my passion. Singing, rapping, being a radio host. I've even been a telemarketer for a year. I used to do some voice-over work. I worked in dubbing. That job requires you to change your voice very significantly. So that no one would recognize you only by listening to you. It made me aware of my vocal cords.

 

This might make it more safe for me to try the things you're talking about. I'm very grateful for your tips. You and MDEW really help me out on these Forums.

 

Yeah man, you got to take care of it. Like cartoon character voice actors, be it dubbing cartoons, Sesame Street, or whatever, they make all sorts of crazy sound effect voices. I can do a really, really good Gollum from the Lord of the Rings. But they have to find the right way. If you've already been down this path, you know all to well.

 

The problem with those 'character' voices (even like Elmo and Grover, or Bart Simpson) is there isn't always a set technique of how to do it. So in some ways it's kind of a no man's land of voice. I haven't been in that industry, so I don't know how much mentorship is actually there.

 

Grit is a bit more documented and some of the singing programs and teachers can help you, but it's still kind of a mess. Some singers never find a truly comfortable way to produce it. There are definitely multiple ways and each singer's anatomy, psychology, and voice habits are different too. So it's very possible something I perceive doesn't work for someone else, or isn't even how I perceive it.

 

I have no discouragement from pursuing it when ready, but yeah, be prepared, and know exactly what up against. It's a cool goal, but be in it for the long haul.

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It's weird, you are okay on the lowest and highest notes but the middle had a few flat spots. Your vowels seem okay and choosing ee as a center vowel is certainly a good choice.

 

Then, again, how long have you practiced this song? That can make a difference.

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It's weird, you are okay on the lowest and highest notes but the middle had a few flat spots. Your vowels seem okay and choosing ee as a center vowel is certainly a good choice.

 

Then, again, how long have you practiced this song? That can make a difference.

 

Thank you for your opinion. I've practiced this song for about 1.5 hour (this particular part, I was repeating it during recording) before recording that final version. I had trouble with the endings of each line. They throw me off a little bit, I'm not skilled enough yet to nail them. I'm pretty new to singing to instrumentals though.

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Like Felipe, it's hard for me to listen to this at such a lower pitch, but I don't necessarily agree that is the reason for it sounding so stiff.   I'd like to hear how you sound after you've sang this a bunch more times and don't have to think about it so much.  

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