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Should your lower abs and back be sore from singing extreme highs?

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Jarom
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Many teachers tell you to push down and out, many teachers will also tell you to never push down and out because it leads to constriction in the neck.  I have found that I can get away with not pushing down and out on lower and only kinda high notes, but on extreme notes such as E5 or G5 I need that downward pressure or else I yelp and screech. Because of this I often have a sore back and stomach. My throat also sometimes feels tight but it feels a lot less tight then if I were to do nothing with my lower abs and back. Do you guys as singers often get sore back and ab muscles and is pushing down and out something that you implement in your singing?

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Well im not fit to speak from a singer standpoint since i cant reach that high nor do i think i have proper breathing/support technique...but from a physical standpoint every single muscle contraction can in the end cause soreness, and i dont see why this would be any different :)

 

But i guess you could wait for a response from someone a bit more competent :)

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Motion, when necessary, in the abs (or lower section)

Note in the head.

Nothing in the throat, ever.

 

Meaning, yes it is better to feel some strain in the support area than to feel it in the throat. When Bruce Dickinson gets back into rehearsals for the next tour, he will spend the first few weeks feeling sore abs as his body gets back into shape. Not only does he do that singing thing, but he runs around the stage. In his 50's.

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I think you may be overactivating some muscles, but yeah. Heavy support does feel that way and it takes a lot of the unnecessary tension from the neck. The voice feels a lot more free when supporting the breath correctly. What you are probably doing is activating the lower back and intercostals in a very powerful way, and that makes  sure that you maintain your diaphragm lowered with that "inhaling coordination". It is awesome because that way the folds are not doing all the job by resisting excess of airflow.

I often feel heat in my lower back when supporting and you can perfectly feel tired -like when walking fast- after a heavy/powerful song. The thing is that one has to be very sure that other unnecessary muscles for singing keep their relaxed state, and that one isolates muscles the best as possible. This way unnecessary tension doesn't creep up to our throats.


As for the "big belly" thing, I found out that personally it doesn't help me much. I don't feel a difference vocally when I keep my belly out, and sometimes I can even feel some unnecessary tension on my lower front side of the neck.
Now I just "inflate" myself without thinking consciously of expanding my belly. It expands, but just a little, feeling the work more on my intercostals and lower back.


I hope I helped. I am not a teacher, though, so I just speak from personal experience and from what I have read.

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Motion, when necessary, in the abs (or lower section)

Note in the head.

Nothing in the throat, ever.

 

Meaning, yes it is better to feel some strain in the support area than to feel it in the throat. When Bruce Dickinson gets back into rehearsals for the next tour, he will spend the first few weeks feeling sore abs as his body gets back into shape. Not only does he do that singing thing, but he runs around the stage. In his 50's.

"Nothing in the throat, ever. Amen." Fixed it for ya :)

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You are activating muscles that simply aren't used to it.  You need to strengthen those muscles just like any other and the soreness will subside.

 

There are some songs that will require strong support where it is going to tire you, but as you build up more stamina, it won't be as tiring.

 

Some singers never go to that level of support. When they do, if they do, it really throws them..... that singing can be (at times) that demanding down below, in the interest of maintaining freedom above.

 

And a weaker or inexperienced singer is likely to tense below because he thinks it's the thing to do, but has not yet figured out how to keep the tension isolated, and instead brings the tension up with him to the vocal folds and surrounding muscles. The work going on below has to remain isolated and that skill takes time to develop.

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These muscles don't get tired for me, they get worked yes but not sore. And I don't really think push down and out I just think support. Support is too complicated to simplify to a direction, it's a lot of different muscles moving in different directions, too much to explain in text. CVT tried to in their book but they still confused me and then when I learned it from a teacher I finally understood what they meant, though there were still some differences between the two.

 

The other thing about support is I think it's individual to your muscle strengths and weaknesses and body type etc. so different people may feel certain aspects of it more strongly than others. IME there would have been no way I could learn it without one on one lessons with a coach.

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If you feel tired and sore it has nothing to do with support you are basically tightening and creating tensions that just don't have to be created.

Yea like i said every muscle contraction can cause soreness...but seems that proper sipport doesent mean contracting your muscles.. Ty Daniel, i also slightly contracted my lower back and abdomen while trying to sing higher. Guess ill stop :)

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Here's Lou Gramm in a new video where you get to see him from the back and you can see the involvement of his back and his whole body in his singing. He's taking in deep, frequent breaths to power his voice.

 

And you can also see how he maintains an alignment despite the challenges of the song.

 

Somebody please embed the video. I cannot.

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