Jump to content

Trying To Understand Vocal Damage

Rate this topic


Victoria Cook
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone

 

I'm new here and I'm having a problem, which I'm hoping you can help with.

 

Over the last year or so, I've noticed that it's been easier and easier to lose my voice if I get ill, and it takes longer for it to come back each time. I had flu a couple of months ago and didn't get my voice back for several weeks.

 

A couple of nights ago, I had a bite of mash and it felt like it got stuck in my throat. Even after an hour and having finished dinner, I still felt as though something was stuck in my throat. I had a bite of bread and butter and it eased but I still feel rather like I have a small lump in my throat. But since then, it feels very tight as well, as though everything is strained and sore. Talking hurts and my voice is hoarse.

 

Someone (oh so kindly) told me it sounds like I have throat cancer and I should see doctor straight away (thanks for that), so I've booked an appointment for Tuesday, but it occurred to me that it could be nodules/polyps on my vocal cords. I was wondering if anyone has experienced similar problems and if so, if you know anything I can do to ease the discomfort, at least temporarily?

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sorry you're having throat pain and problems. It can be very complicated. I'm not sure if polyps would be causing pain. I know they can cause hoarseness.

 

I developed throat pain about 7 years ago or so, but in the end it appears to be nerve malfunction for me.  I don't have hoarseness, but when the pain is really severe it is so sensitive it can prevent me from speaking. If it is nerve related, be open minded about various medications, as a lot of atypical medications can treat it (certain breeds of anti convulsants and anti depressants in particular work for people without epilepsy or depression).

 

Anyway there are a variety of reasons I've learned of why someone might feel a lump sensation in the throat. The least helpful is an old diagnosis doctors used to give of 'globus hystericus,' which would be disparagingly applied to patients, as anxiety can cause tension in the throat (not usually painful). So take care to find a doctor that treats your issue seriously.

 

There is one called Eagle's Syndrome which can be measured more objectively.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_syndrome 

 

Another thing that can happen is muscle tension dysphonia:

 

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/otolaryngology/specialty_areas/voice_center/conditions/muscle_tension_dysphonia.html

 

Where the body can start to malfunction after an illness, causing hoarse speech patterns and so forth. There are also theories about acid reflux causing throat tension, hoarseness, and so forth.

 

The good news, is a lot of times if it is something like cancer where a real lump is occurring, it often won't be felt until very advanced stages. That's not to say you shouldn't get it checked out. You definitely should and be open to as many possibilities as you can, but it is often not felt in that way.

 

Anyway, in my situation, they suspected possible Eagles and Muscle Tension Dysphonia, couldn't find evidence of Eagles and speech therapy was not helpful. When I got on nerve damage medications I regained much of my voice and a lot more function in my life, though I still have pain every day no matter what. So by all means look for physically measurable things and get it seriously checked out. But if you get left a bit high and dry like I did, be sure to look into possible nerve related stuff too.

 

Even with nerve damage, I still work on a daily basis to try to desensitize the nerve as much as possible through regular exercise (exposure to painful stimulus), as disuse can encourage it to 're-sensitize' where as other healthier nerve connections can just sit there. 

 

http://www.livestrong.com/article/267410-neuropathic-pain-exercises/

 

Vocal health problems are a very complex issue and certainly no one here could diagnose you or predict your outcomes. Ideally, whatever is happening to you will be easily diagnosed and treated. If it isn't easily solved, be your own advocate and take care of yourself above all else. It's your body, you have to live with it, so place you first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks KillerKu. I'm not sure whether it would cause pain either. I suspect I'm grasping at anything that decreases the fear in my mind of it being anything more serious! I'm a catastrophist and a hypochondriac and that is a bad combinaton when it comes to biological problems.

 

It feels to me sort of like a cross between what it says about dysphonia and the globus hystericus. It doesn't feel like there's a lump there all the time, as such. But sometimes it feels like my throat no longer knows the difference between swallowing down and bringing back up, if that makes sense? Sometimes, when I try to swallow, I can feel the muscles at the bottom of my throat working in the wrong direction. Or at least, that's what it feels like. 

 

I'm sorry to hear about the problems you've had. It's incredibly difficult when you feel like the medical profession has abandoned you. You've made some very interesting points about it all and been very helpful though, thank you.

 

When I see my doctor on Tuesday, is there anything in particular I should mention?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At least in the beginning, you should be honest about symptoms, but you don't need to overly research things for your first round of things. When patients get too educated, some doctors see that as its own 'illness' (sadly). I've always had kind of the opposite of hypochondria, where I'm extremely skeptical, but doctors still sometimes have problems with patients having too much input.

 

Let them do the best job they can as medical professionals first. But if you end up suffering with something they can't diagnose or solve, and get left high and dry, you'll have to be a lot more active. There was only so much 'you have to relax, and stop tensing up when in severe pain' and 'you just gotta talk more right, dude' I could take.  

 

Swallowing muscles can be measured to some degree as well with barium swallows. I had mine tested, and they appeared normal even though swallowing food was painful. If the malfunction is occasional, it may not help.

 

Anyway, the body is very complex. There are a lot of conscious, semi conscious, and non conscious patterns that occur between the brain and body. So anxiety can play a role in throat tension for sure, and it does suck for me. I relax as much as I can.

 

But throat problems are very complicated, as the musculature and nerve innervation there are some for the more complex in the entire body. If it was just your bicep, it's a lot more clear that most people don't get 'weird bicep habits' or 'tense bicep when anxious and are being 'overly dramatic.' Doctors can sometimes have these thoughts.

 

You shouldn't need to be feeling hypochrondia if you can help it. For the time being, I'd be open minded with doctors. They have a huge amount of knowledge and you should take any help you can get, but ultimately you'll have to figure out for yourself what is helpful for you. For the time being, relax, and try to take care of yourself as best as you can and when you reach each of those steps, explore them as openly as you can. If speech therapy were to fail for example, well, you'd know it wasn't likely a speech problem, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might be similar to me. Do you have a tendency to "swallow the wrong way"? Aspirate liquids, food, even sinus drainage in your sleep? This would be from having a epiglottis and false vocal folds that are slightly smaller than normal. I had to learn to sleep on my sides. Otherwise, I would wake up drowning in the night, choking and coughing like crazy.

 

So, before you think of cancer, first be aware of how you swallow. And get in the habit of sleeping on your sides. See if that doesn't help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there

 

Rowns - I sleep on my side every night anyway, so it's hard to say, to be honest! I don't tend to cough very much during the night, but I do feel at times as though the muscles at the bottom of my throat have stopped working properly, and push upwards rather than downwards, like you say. Even if I really concentrate, I can't seem to make them work the right way!!

 

I went to my GP this morning. He's said that since I'm only 29, have never even held a lit cigarette, let alone smoked one, etc, throat cancer is highly unlikely, but he did suggest a vocal nodule. But, such is the way of the good old NHS, I'm being forced to work through an entire bottle of special mouthwash and gargle to prove my dry powder inhalers aren't causing throat irritation before they'll do anything else! I'm a bit frustrated, to tell the truth. Right now, my throat is absolutely killing!! I can feel it up into my jaw, my neck aches a bit and I still feel as though I have a lump in my throat. Grr. Worst of all, I can't sing!! My voice gets hoarse and airy much lower than it used to. I'm by no means an amazing singer, but because I work from home, I sing along to the radio (LOUDLY) for a couple of hours a day. ANd I talk. A LOT. To my parents, my Gran, my husband, my friend...so frustrating not knowing what is really wrong or what I can do about it!! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Singing loudly for hours can sometimes cause fatigue. How much depends on the technique and your physiology. I'm not saying that is what is happening, but it might be a good idea to try toning down the volume and duration for a bit. Even well trained singers need to rest.

 

Just a question, but are you familiar with how to sing quietly? Prior to getting on meds, I could barely speak and sometimes simply could not. My situation was a bit unique, as it seemed like certain voices were less painful than other voices. In retrospect, it seems most likely that lower vibration voices were less painful than higher vibration (on the the offending nerve).

 

But I did discover kind of a Michael Jackson speaking voice that was less stimulating than my regular man voice. When I speak normally if I set my hand on the offending area I can feel the vibration. Anyway, when I sing very softly, like to a baby, it's not breathy, it's like a small amount of air gently leaking out, I stilll use a variance on that voice and the coolest thing about it is basically the entire range is very low effort and doesn't require much musculature to support. For me, I can basically completely relax most of the supporting muscles, slack jawed, slack bodied from head to toe and use it, so it's a nice way of deconstricting.

 

If it is at all related to singing and speaking, someone can probably help you find a voice that is less strenuous, there are also a lot of ways to sing with less muscular involvement. I know back in the day when I'd push chest without bridging, I'd get a mild fatigue in some of the support muscles around the larynx. It wasn't a huge amount, but it was there and it is possible.

 

Anyway, I don't want you thinking it 'is' singing or speaking, especially if you're prone to hypochondria. One of the most important things for medical problems is to try not to jump to a conclusion. You've need to remain skeptical and try to figure this thing out. But that process could take quite awhile, and in the mean time if you can get your mind focused on relaxing extraneous stuff as much as you can while going it could help.

 

Cause even if something isn't the problem, like for me, I'm pretty sure pushing chest wasn't the problem, but it's still strenuous, right?  Even now, I push it less, cause I have to be able to relax. Mild tension for someone without a medical problem problem, is exactly that: mild tension, where as mild tension for somenoe with a medical problem can be an entirely different experience, right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I absolutely know what you mean! Sometimes, if I'm in the car with someone and a song comes on the radio, they don't necessarily want my warbling at the top of my lungs, so I sing much more quietly. When I do, I find my voice feels less strained and the vocal range is far greater than when I sing more loudly. But because I enjoy singing so much, and because I'm alone for huge portions of the day, I get used to really belting it out, and I will attack songs I haven't a hope in hell of reaching the high notes in, and I NEVER warm up my voice. I never have done because until recently, I didn't know you should! So essentially, what I've been doing is the equivalent of lifting very heavy weights with no warm-ups and no stretching before or after. Which is why I suspect it could be at least part of what is going on.

 

Having said that, you are right of course, and I shouldn't go assuming it's that, or that it's anything else until I know more. All I can really say with certainty is that I've been resting my voice completely for about 4 hours and so far, the strained feeling in my throat has gone (although the feeling of a lump being in it is still there). Will see what happens when I go back to the doctor (seriously, no mouthwash/throat gargle is going to fix this).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, Victoria, take heart, we in America are working our way toward NHS. ACA is the stepping point, designed to ruin the current insurance industry, making NHS mandatory. Pretty soon, we will also have a 45 percent tax bracket and then, if you came to America, everything could be the same, except for the accent.

:D  :ph34r:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh blimey, really?! Does that seem like a good thing to you in America, or a bad thing?

 

And by the way, I would love the accent! Since I was about 5, I've dreamed of going to America. Some day...!

People need health care but often, when the government tries to solve a problem, it does not get solved in the best way. ACA will fail because people will not pay for coverage for a male crack addict down the street to be covered for mammograms. And so, the 3rd party insurance system we have had will fail as it cannot cover what is now required by law with not enough young and healthy people paying unadjusted premiums. It's simple math, really. So, it will fail and then the government will enact single payor, which is what NHS is in the UK.

 

And lest I get censored or hurt some feelings, I am not talking politics. I am talking simple math and money. To enact ACA, it will raise taxes on every single person. And the current tax season for 2014 is about to hurt the feelings of a lot of people who thought ACA was a good idea until they realize that they have to pay for the coverage of some guy who will sire children without a careful thought and keep on doing it, regardless of education of the ability to control one's reproductive behavior. And if I do get censored, well, it's been nice knowing you.

 

So, which american accent do you like? Northeast, like Boston or New York City? Drawn out twang like the southeast, such as Alabama or Georgia? Slightly less twang and drawn out phrasing, like Texas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm....that all makes sense.

 

The problem with having a centralised healthcare system like we have is that there is never and will never be enough money to cover everything that is needed by the public from the NHS. We hear a lot about healthcare being 'a postcode lottery', where people in one area get access to the best treatments from the NHS, but those in another area don't have the same benefit. People evade paying taxes, and we give all our money to football players and politicians, so there's never enough for the emergency services, such as the NHS. Nurses and doctors get paid a tiny amount of what they should be earning. To be honest, I'm not sure what the answer is. We're lucky to have non-privatised healthcare because the poorer among us (myself included) wouldn't be able to afford it. But what we have right now is very hit-and-miss. So maybe you'd find it was better to have it, but maybe not!

 

Oh goodness, I like most of them. I adore Texas (Michael Nesmith has one of the most wonderful speaking voices I've ever heard!) and I adore the deep-south drawls of Alabama and Georgia. Only ones I'm not so keen on, I'd say, are Tennessee and Kentucky. Particularly Tennessee I always find a little whiney! And now I'm dreadfully worried I'll have offended someone!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of my favorite accents is that of actor Tommy Lee Jones, who is from Houston, Texas. Another actor I have actually met and talked to, in person, is Shelley Duvall, also from Houston. Though, I have not met her brother, actor Robert Duvall. 

 

Another actor who would have been nice to meet is Bill Paxton, from Dallas. I have not met him, though he is from my area.

 

Two of my favorite Tommy Lee Jones lines:

 

One, in a commercial for Red Dog Beer: "You just picked the wrong dog to jack with."

 

and, from the fugitive when Harrison Ford, as Dr. Kimble says. "I didn't kill my wife!"

 

Tommy says, "I don't care!" Trivia: that was not in the script. Tommy was tired and wet, sitting in that running stream. But he delivered with such force and authenticity, the director decided it was a keeper.

 

Funny thing is, I was born in California. But I can hear a bit of Texas in my voice. But people that were born in Texas can tell I was not born here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Must admit, I'm not a big Tommy Lee Jones fan, but he is awesome in The Fugitive. I actually did know that about him in it! But only because I read all the trivia for just about every TV programme and film I know and like, obsessively! It's desperately sad, I suspect, but there's so much out there to read about these things! And that particular little tidbit is one I especially laughed at!

 

Oh Bill Paxton is fab! Love him.

 

It makes sense, about your accent. People from other countries tend to think that over here in the UK we all have one of two accents - we either sound 'proper cockney, mate!', as if we're all from East London, or we're cut-glass English like Julie Andrews. I'm from the South Coast, so I'm more Julie Andrews (or, as so many people tell me, 'posh') but there are TONS of regional accents. Bristol, Surrey, Mancunian, Northampton, etc, etc. Personally, I love Sunderland as an accent. If you look up 'Whatever Happened To The Likely Lads', you'll get an example-ish of that.

 

Accents are an amazing thing. I absolutely love them and always have. Irish, Scottish, American, Welsh, Australian...if I could study phonetics, I would!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Must admit, I'm not a big Tommy Lee Jones fan, but he is awesome in The Fugitive. I actually did know that about him in it! But only because I read all the trivia for just about every TV programme and film I know and like, obsessively! It's desperately sad, I suspect, but there's so much out there to read about these things! And that particular little tidbit is one I especially laughed at!

 

Oh Bill Paxton is fab! Love him.

 

It makes sense, about your accent. People from other countries tend to think that over here in the UK we all have one of two accents - we either sound 'proper cockney, mate!', as if we're all from East London, or we're cut-glass English like Julie Andrews. I'm from the South Coast, so I'm more Julie Andrews (or, as so many people tell me, 'posh') but there are TONS of regional accents. Bristol, Surrey, Mancunian, Northampton, etc, etc. Personally, I love Sunderland as an accent. If you look up 'Whatever Happened To The Likely Lads', you'll get an example-ish of that.

 

Accents are an amazing thing. I absolutely love them and always have. Irish, Scottish, American, Welsh, Australian...if I could study phonetics, I would!

I know what you mean. I had a friend here in the states who is from Manchester. Eventually, he moved back to Manchester. Anyway, at times, his accent was so thick, he sounded scottish, to me. There are so many accents in England. And from varying social familes. Robert Plant came from a middle class family and his accent shows it. Rob Halford came from Birmingham and his accent shows that. Glenn Hughes from the Midlands. His accent shows that. Subtle, not so subtle. Just like, I can tell the difference between someone from Georgia or Louisiana and one from Texas.

 

Or upper midwest. I new a person who is from Iowa and have noticed that others from Iowa sound the same.

 

I can tell the difference, in spanish, between someone from Mexico and some from Honduras.

 

And then, there are the variations of scottish accents. Billy Conally is very thick. Annie Lennox, not quite so. And Ewan MacGregor, quite slight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Going to move away from the topic of accents for a moment (though I agree completely about Ewan and Billy, and the impact of social background on accents) to say I went back to my GP yesterday afternoon because I'm still having problems with my throat and with my stomach. She's said it's definitely an issue of excess acid and has prescribed me a different medicine to use for it. I started to take the medicine (Omeprazole) yesterday evening so time will tell if that works. Right now, my voice is still horribly hoarse and croaky. I can't hit the same notes I used to, unless I use a different part of my throat to sing them, which I'm not sure is correct. It seems probable that the excess acid is affecting my throat and therefore my voice, but it worries me a bit. It's been a problem for so long now that I'm concerned it could cause/has already caused permanent damage to my voice. Is that possible??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Victoria,

 

In case your doctor didn't tell you about Omeprazole (which most do not), here's a link for you to check out >>

 

http://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-3766-2250/omeprazole-oral/omeprazoledelayedreleasetablet-oral/details

 

Also, I just re-read your post of January 27, 2015 @ 6:46 A.M. in which you stated : "I'm being forced to work through an entire bottle of special mouthwash and gargle to prove my dry powder inhalers aren't causing throat irritation......"

 

Personally, I use Tudorza at bedtime and either Symbicort or the Advair diskus in the morning. ALL are powdered inhalers. I have noticed that all of the above not only cause a burning sensation in the throat, but also under the tongue. The instructions tell you to wash out your mouth thoroughly with water which doesn't help !!! As for the "special mouthwash" you mentioned, I highly doubt that will work as well. I've tried a variety of different mouthwashes myself and they simply don't help. In fact, I have my own mouthwash I've put together just for singing, and that doesn't work either.

 

Obviously, I have no idea what your diagnosis may be, but you may want to ask your doctor to change your inhaler(s) to an aerosol such as Ventolin or something similar. Just a thought....

 

I hope this has helped.

 

Sincere Regards,

Adolph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Adolph.

 

I actually got switched to the dry powder inhalers when I was 14 because up until then I'd had brittle asthma from the age of 7, and had been in and out of hospital constantly. Literally from the moment I switched over, my asthma almost totally disappeared. Because of that, I'm kind of reluctant to switch back. It's great not having to constantly walk around with my inhaler in hand! And to be honest, I haven't had any problems with my throat, tongue or voice before now until the last few months, which makes me reluctant to believe it is really the inhalers, you know?

 

Right now, I've been told that it really is just excess stomach acid, but I do still wonder if there's a little more to it. If the new acid meds do their job (it's helping a bit so far) but I still have vocal trouble, they might be willing to investigate further. Just have to wait and see, I guess!

 

Thanks very much for replying. :0)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Thanks Adolph.

 

I actually got switched to the dry powder inhalers when I was 14 because up until then I'd had brittle asthma from the age of 7, and had been in and out of hospital constantly. Literally from the moment I switched over, my asthma almost totally disappeared. Because of that, I'm kind of reluctant to switch back. It's great not having to constantly walk around with my inhaler in hand! And to be honest, I haven't had any problems with my throat, tongue or voice before now until the last few months, which makes me reluctant to believe it is really the inhalers, you know?

 

Right now, I've been told that it really is just excess stomach acid, but I do still wonder if there's a little more to it. If the new acid meds do their job (it's helping a bit so far) but I still have vocal trouble, they might be willing to investigate further. Just have to wait and see, I guess!

 

Thanks very much for replying. :0)

You're most welcome, Victoria :)

 

Yes, I understand that the powdered inhalers help you more than the aerosol types and DO understand your reluctance to switch back...

But I just couldn't help but to notice your comment about the powdered inhalers POSSIBLY causing your problem.

 

I was prescribed Omeprazole in 40 mg several months ago and then it was just reduced to 20 mg recently. It was added to the Zantac which I have been taking for quite some time due to the other medications I take for pain as a result of a spinal injury. (Long story). What I DON'T understand is WHY my doctor added the Omeprazole as I've never had problems with acid reflux or gerd nor did I mention ANYTHING with regards to same ??? As such, I'm wondering why your doctor prescribed Omeprazole ??? As for my doctor, it seemed that he just pulled this idea out of his head without any testing ??? In fact, I haven't even tried the Omeprazole as I find absolutely NO NEED to add yet another medication to those I currently take....

 

On a side note (and I can't help but to add this), most doctors receive very little education in med school as far as medications are concerned. It may surprise you, but most of the doctors receive their information about MANY, MANY drugs from the DRUG DISTRIBUTORS !!! Interesting, isn't it ???

 

Getting back to your situation, I'm happy to hear that the Omeprazole is helping you somewhat, but I wish I had another recommendation with regards to your continued vocal problems. I suppose I need to do more research.... You'll be the first to know if I can come up with a solution. I will also ask MY doctors if they have any recommendations for you. :)

 

Regards,

Adolph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not going to say it isn't possible, but I do think it's unlikely because the symptoms in my throat keep fluctuating and I haven't used the mouthwash/gargle yet! I don't know...the lump went away for a few days but it came back yesterday. Humph. :0(

 

Very strange that the doc prescribed you Omeprazole when you have no history of acid reflux, because as far as I know, that's the main thing it's used for! In my case, it's because of excess acid and acid reflux. It's been a problem for me on and off for a number of years now. But I was prescribed it when I began getting a hollow, echoey sort of sensation in my stomach. Like an intense hunger, but not? Anyway, apparently that's a symptom of excess acid. Don't know if maybe that sounds familiar to you at all? If not, then I have NO clue why your doc gave you omeprazole!

 

That is HIGHLY distburbing! I wonder if that's what happens over here in the UK? I know that the way things work tends to differ quite a lot between there and here, but who knows?!? I hope medicine companies don't sell directly to doctors over here as well!

 

Thanks, Adolph. It's a bit distressing to me at the moment, I have to say, not knowing exactly what the cause is. My GP said he thought it could be a vocal nodule and that's why I'm here, but apparently the only way to know for sure is a nasoscopy, and they're reluctant to even do that. Every time I go back and say 'yeah...it's still happening', they kind of say 'hmm...well, it's unlikely to be serious, so it's probably just acid or something' and that's the end of it. In the meantime, people keep telling me it sounds like throat cancer or stomach cancer or thyroid cancer and it's terrified the heck out of me!!! Especially when I can't get the doctor to look at it properly. Arrgh!! Haha!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Thanks, Adolph. It's a bit distressing to me at the moment, I have to say, not knowing exactly what the cause is. My GP said he thought it could be a vocal nodule and that's why I'm here, but apparently the only way to know for sure is a nasoscopy, and they're reluctant to even do that. Every time I go back and say 'yeah...it's still happening', they kind of say 'hmm...well, it's unlikely to be serious, so it's probably just acid or something' and that's the end of it. In the meantime, people keep telling me it sounds like throat cancer or stomach cancer or thyroid cancer and it's terrified the heck out of me!!! Especially when I can't get the doctor to look at it properly. Arrgh!! Haha!

 

I hate to beat a dead horse when it is down but that is the problem of medicine by government control. They have decided that your problem, while inconvenient and uncomfortable, is not life-threatening. And if it was a terminal illness, they would say, well, nothing we can do, might as well give you pain pills and a happy place to be. Meanwhile, you pay more in taxes. You get past a certain point of income and it becomes a 50 percent or higher tax bracket. That is why David Coverdale and Rob Halford live in the United States. They are what is called "Tax Exiles." Thanks, however, to the passage of ACA here, they will be taxed more here. Problem being, if you were not taxed so much, you could afford to go to a private doctor who knows what he is doing. It's going to be this tax season due April of 2015 where you are going to see a massive loss of popularity for our current president and the ACA bill. A lot of people thought it would be free to them, It will not.No person shall escape being penalized for not buying mammagram coverage for the male junkie down at the end of the street.

 

And, in private practice, a doctor has to be good to economically survive, as opposed to receiving a chunk of government cheese as compensation.

 

So, you are still stuck when it comes to what to do and what is actually wrong with you. Not much I can do to help but to wish you well.

 

You might simply have misadventures. I tend to "swallow the wrong way." Stuff gets aspirated and I would wake up choking in the night, So, I learned to sleep on my sides.

 

It is my theory that I have a tighter and smaller epiglottis which doesn't always close completely. this would explain that problem and maybe why I cannot engage "false vocal folds" as easily as others can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

I'm not going to say it isn't possible, but I do think it's unlikely because the symptoms in my throat keep fluctuating and I haven't used the mouthwash/gargle yet! I don't know...the lump went away for a few days but it came back yesterday. Humph. :0(

 

Very strange that the doc prescribed you Omeprazole when you have no history of acid reflux, because as far as I know, that's the main thing it's used for! In my case, it's because of excess acid and acid reflux. It's been a problem for me on and off for a number of years now. But I was prescribed it when I began getting a hollow, echoey sort of sensation in my stomach. Like an intense hunger, but not? Anyway, apparently that's a symptom of excess acid. Don't know if maybe that sounds familiar to you at all? If not, then I have NO clue why your doc gave you omeprazole!

 

That is HIGHLY distburbing! I wonder if that's what happens over here in the UK? I know that the way things work tends to differ quite a lot between there and here, but who knows?!? I hope medicine companies don't sell directly to doctors over here as well!

 

Thanks, Adolph. It's a bit distressing to me at the moment, I have to say, not knowing exactly what the cause is. My GP said he thought it could be a vocal nodule and that's why I'm here, but apparently the only way to know for sure is a nasoscopy, and they're reluctant to even do that. Every time I go back and say 'yeah...it's still happening', they kind of say 'hmm...well, it's unlikely to be serious, so it's probably just acid or something' and that's the end of it. In the meantime, people keep telling me it sounds like throat cancer or stomach cancer or thyroid cancer and it's terrified the heck out of me!!! Especially when I can't get the doctor to look at it properly. Arrgh!! Haha!

Victoria,

 

Kindly note the email I sent to you.

 

Again ---- I cannot stress this point enough >>> Do NOT listen to these people who are suggesting "cancer" ! They are NOT doctors any more than I am !

 

I hope it has helped....

 

Adolph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...