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I have been waiting for a girl like you(Take 2)

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aravindmadis
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Hi Folks, 

 

This is a second take of this song.  I have been down with throat infection and cough again in the last 10 days and my voice is not in the best shape.  

 

I have been meaning to do this for a while, since my skills have improved.. This is, like some of my recent recordings, a single take.  To me it sounds a little unpolished... 

 

This is a very difficult song for me.  I am unsure how much air I need to use and I feel dangerously close to flipping from head voice into falsetto!  

 

I seem to have problem with the pitch(just a little shaky).. What do I need to do to improve pitch accuracy(obviously talking about live singing here where we don't have luxury of multiple takes).. 

 

http://vocaroo.com/i/s0JOC0jOmpnN

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Wow, that is hard. As a rule I don't touch Lou Gramm all that much. Not only is he Bob's hero, but the guy is always singing so high.  Honestly I think you did better than I would if I were to one take that on on pitch. I agree if you're gonna go live you've gotta train, but you've got to have some patience for yourself.

 

Here's the thing, when I hear it, I do hear a light connection. Now, maybe it's not the sound you're wanting as a complete sound yet, but in a way this is a good thing.

 

I wasn't even sure if I could sing that chorus without falsetto. I can, but there's a complication, let me show you:

 

Raw: https://app.box.com/s/lb5syr7hezyxe0puqtyzn9yjdcvra19r

 

With Reverb Etc: https://app.box.com/s/gy8r1876dbe2n9hfd72go01mymca3oc8

 

0:00. mostly falsetto (a bit Smokey Robinson ish)

0:09  more connected from Smokey

0:15 starting to lean the other way

0:19 More connection

0:25. Very connected (felt a bit like belting, which sounds fine, but maybe too much connection and pressing the cords)

 

From 0:00 to :025 I was increasing the the 'curbing' feeling. Really leaning into the vowel on that is in 'book.'

 

0:38 Backed off that sensation and starting quacking more with twang

0:50  More quacking

0:57 Extremely quacky (sounds a bit ridiculous)

 

1:07.  Backed off both a bit and attempted using more air (sounds good, but may be too much air)

 

So basically, I don't know which one is right for me, but I do know the Smokey Robinson one has the least pressed phonation and throwing air at it is not a good idea either.

 

So my advice is to maybe take it a bit slow and try to lean into a position that is stable, not fatiguing and so forth. I'm still not confident in my notes there. It's not the sound, it's that it is more fatiguing on the vocal folds themselves when sending my voice that high. None of them were particularly unpleasant and I'm not sore or hoarse, but I have a feeling it's best to dial such a thing in for long term use.

 

And you're saying you want to go live and go pro with singing. That makes it all the more, right? I'm fine if I do that like 8 times there. Could have done it a lot more, but if I did that chorus for hours, I might not be fine, since I don't do that..

 

So going back to the beginning, if you're in this for the long haul, take your time. Don't rush it. Cause right now you're in a pretty good place, and just a bit more closure may be good, but too much may be bad. :D

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Hi Folks,

This is a second take of this song. I have been down with throat infection and cough again in the last 10 days and my voice is not in the best shape.

I have been meaning to do this for a while, since my skills have improved.. This is, like some of my recent recordings, a single take. To me it sounds a little unpolished...

This is a very difficult song for me. I am unsure how much air I need to use and I feel dangerously close to flipping from head voice into falsetto!

I seem to have problem with the pitch(just a little shaky).. What do I need to do to improve pitch accuracy(obviously talking about live singing here where we don't have luxury of multiple takes)..

http://vocaroo.com/i/s0JOC0jOmpnN

Keep the twang consistent as you descend from the upper notes. The upper ones twang fine, but as you approach the passagio from the topside, it gets lost.

Some top-down sirens and scales which approach the transition from the top should make the difference, with 15 mins a day for 2-3 weeks. IMO, you will also want to visit the specific vowels you sing in that area. They are not as resonant as they could be. The exercise for that is to sing each vowel shade related (close by) to the one you think you want. One of them will simply be much better the all the others. However, the 'right' vowel will change every couple notes. Be patient.

When you doing both of those, singing with consistent twang and spot-on vowels, it will be wonderful, and easier, much easier to sing.

That is how Lou (the master) does it.. Each note/vowel combination is ' just-so', perfect.

I hope this is helpful.

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The only thing I could add is maybe you are hitting the RR in Girl a little to hard.

I may be projecting my own problem into this while listening. I know that I have problems when the rr sound shows up. I know the rr sound is made different in other languages. I make that sound with my top teeth resting on my lower lip and that may be why I have trouble with it. I believe other languages use a curled tongue to make that sound.

Everything sounds good to me in this. I do not have enough experience to pick out subtle things that could help your progress.

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Hi Folks.. I think the problem in the song seems to be in the chorus(obviously).. I think I understand what you are trying to say even when I don't always understand the technical details.  

 

Steven, thanks for your feedback.. "The upper ones twang fine, but as you approach the passagio from the topside, it gets lost".. I think I know what you mean.  I interpret this as a configuration that helps me to reach the higher notes, I seem to lose that configuration when I descend.  I have to find a way to stay "up" there, whatever twang means.. I have always had this problem and you have explained my issue in a way it makes sense to me! Thank you very much.. 

 

Please listen to this short version.  It is an experiment based on your feedback.. I think I like the "I have been waiting" at 0:11 and the "yeah waiting" at 0:30.. I understand what you nice folks mean when you say it sounds "disconnected" and "not full".   Also why we should work to make each note seemingly flow from the previous note like a river flowing and not jumpy.... 

 

https://app.box.com/s/o5f7d9fcjdl7otm5477tx5vbr7dzdjip

 

I am not straining here.  I guess that makes make me a high voice albeit one that is heavier than Lou Gramm.. Somehow in my subconscious, when I have approached the chorus, I have tried to mimic Lou Gramm's voice and the tone and not tried to sing in my own voice.  This is the most difficult part about singing covers for me!! 

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What Steven said. Basically, you want to keep some of that configuration as you descend and also back off the air pressure just a teeny, tiny bit.

 

And MDEW is right. Take the roll out of that 'r'. English is a murderous language in which to sing.

 

To give an example, you backed off the pressure on some of the low stuff. Not only did it keep your tone good but it helped make it seem more intimate, as parts of this song are.

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 Loved it! you sound like a professional singer along almost the entire song. Then I 'll give you another turn and I will dwell on issues that you need to work ; but I would love to say I think you're on the right track !! congratulations

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Thanks Bono.. I think I have a few areas to improve, like Steven says not losing "twang compression" on descending

It's more a habit than muscular strain. If you do an inner smile or yawn to get twang, whichever it is, you will learn to hold it as you descend, basically keeping a tuning alignment. It would seem odd at first, until you get used to it.

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Hi Folks.. I think the problem in the song seems to be in the chorus(obviously).. I think I understand what you are trying to say even when I don't always understand the technical details.

Steven, thanks for your feedback.. "The upper ones twang fine, but as you approach the passagio from the topside, it gets lost".. I think I know what you mean. I interpret this as a configuration that helps me to reach the higher notes, I seem to lose that configuration when I descend. I have to find a way to stay "up" there, whatever twang means.. I have always had this problem and you have explained my issue in a way it makes sense to me! Thank you very much..

Please listen to this short version. It is an experiment based on your feedback.. I think I like the "I have been waiting" at 0:11 and the "yeah waiting" at 0:30.. I understand what you nice folks mean when you say it sounds "disconnected" and "not full". Also why we should work to make each note seemingly flow from the previous note like a river flowing and not jumpy....

https://app.box.com/s/o5f7d9fcjdl7otm5477tx5vbr7dzdjip

I am not straining here. I guess that makes make me a high voice albeit one that is heavier than Lou Gramm.. Somehow in my subconscious, when I have approached the chorus, I have tried to mimic Lou Gramm's voice and the tone and not tried to sing in my own voice. This is the most difficult part about singing covers for me!!

This recording is much improved. Congrats! The twang is more consistent, with the last 'waiting' the best, and you also did a little vowel change for that one, as well, on the 2nd syllable of that word.

The key interval is the change in those two syllables. Though it will seem strange as an exercise, you can isolate them for practice individually (sing the first, several time alone, no preceding syllables) on multiple vowel shades (wee, we', weh) to find just the right one.

Right now, you are using the very bright we', (very close to wee, like the word way without the diphthong) like Lou, which has a lower passaggio than the others, which is why it helps you get 'up' there, but may not tune to your harmonics the best. So, sing the note just like you do, hold it a bit, and let your jaw drop just a smidgen progressively until the high ring appears. When you find it, make a notation of how you think about it, and repeat the exercise with the next vowel in the series.

With each vowel, you will be raising the 1st formant, and increasing the oscuro (dark) of the sound. I think you will find the very best one between the we' you are using and a bright weh.

Then, do the same with the 2nd syllable of the word, singing it alone with all the shades between ee and ih, keeping twang, until you find the perfect one.

Then put them together on the two notes, listening for the exact ping that you got singing them individually. This will be a little more challenging, but with 10 mins of practice a day on it, after a few days you will be able to get them both to ring right consistently.

Finally, add the preceding word (been) and try out bee, bih and beh as alternatives.

At that point, you can reincorporate them into the phrase of the chorus.

Keep up the good work. You have made great progress in a short time.

I hope this is helpful.

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This recording is much improved. Congrats! The twang is more consistent, with the last 'waiting' the best, and you also did a little vowel change for that one, as well, on the 2nd syllable of that word.

The key interval is the change in those two syllables. Though it will seem strange as an exercise, you can isolate them for practice individually (sing the first, several time alone, no preceding syllables) on multiple vowel shades (wee, we', weh) to find just the right one.

Right now, you are using the very bright we', (very close to wee, like the word way without the diphthong) like Lou, which has a lower passaggio than the others, which is why it helps you get 'up' there, but may not tune to your harmonics the best. So, sing the note just like you do, hold it a bit, and let your jaw drop just a smidgen progressively until the high ring appears. When you find it, make a notation of how you think about it, and repeat the exercise with the next vowel in the series.

With each vowel, you will be raising the 1st formant, and increasing the oscuro (dark) of the sound. I think you will find the very best one between the we' you are using and a bright weh.

Then, do the same with the 2nd syllable of the word, singing it alone with all the shades between ee and ih, keeping twang, until you find the perfect one.

Then put them together on the two notes, listening for the exact ping that you got singing them individually. This will be a little more challenging, but with 10 mins of practice a day on it, after a few days you will be able to get them both to ring right consistently.

Finally, add the preceding word (been) and try out bee, bih and beh as alternatives.

At that point, you can reincorporate them into the phrase of the chorus.

Keep up the good work. You have made great progress in a short time.

I hope this is helpful.

 

Steven, thank you very much for the patience to explain in detail.  This is very useful to me.  I have always sung from instinct, probably from lack of formal training.  Only I after spending a lot of time here do I know and understand the value of approaching a song like a surgeon approaches an operation! 

This feedback not only helps me to look out for the weak spots in my singing which were not obvious to me, but also gives me a problem solving approach... Thank you once again.. 

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