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What's the "break" he's talking about?

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forgivendays
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I've read in an interview with Myles that he didn't have the tenor register to start with, but he obtained it through practice. Usually, at least for myself, it takes more effort to hold the voice together at your former breakpoint. I had my breakpoint around f# above middle C before, but nowadays I can sing d# above tenor high c in full voice. The high notes are usually less of a problem than if a song has a LOT of notes just at my former breakpoint, since it takes a bit more effort to sing there and the voice tires more quickly.

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Cool! Do you know where I can find this interview?

Around 1:50 in this video he says he's between a baritone and a tenor.

To me all the practice I've done has made the notes around my break a little easier to sing.

Have you been able to shift your break higher or are the notes you're getting "twanged-falsetto" (I can get confused with terms so this is how I refer to it :D)

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Cool! Do you know where I can find this interview?

Around 1:50 in this video he says he's between a baritone and a tenor.

To me all the practice I've done has made the notes around my break a little easier to sing.

Have you been able to shift your break higher or are the notes you're getting "twanged-falsetto" (I can get confused with terms so this is how I refer to it :D)

Morid: In common parlance, the 'break point' is the place in the scale which is the point of maximum vocal instability. For the male singer, the place where the chest voice resonance strategy and thick-cord phonation cannot be sustained without changing technique.

Not everybody experiences this, or in the same place. For example, the break point for certain vowels will be lower or higher. Most of the time, the break point is located for /a/ (ah), the vowel which has the highest passaggio point.

The use of twang reduces the instability of this region of the voice. If it is combined with a lightened registration, using softer dynamic notes initially, the break can be securely traversed, so that it is no longer an issue.

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Can't remember exactly where I read it, but he talked about him singing "from the throat" in the beginning, and when he sang with open throat and proper vowel modifications he extended his range a lot. And I don't know if he thinks about his voice in exactly the same way I do, but for me my voice needs a little more effort to hold it together through my former break area. And to me it seemed he was talking about the same sensation.

I wouldn't really say I moved my break point... More like I handled it and moved into a different part of my voice. I use a lot of twang, and as I go higher I imagine my voice to get a little thinner, without loosing the chesty sound though. I can still move into falsetto if I like, but I usually prefer to stay in full voice. But vocal terminology is such a jungle, I'd say I use belted full voice above my former break point, but CVT would probably say I use Curbing quite a lot, and my former voice teacher would call it a chesty mixed voice. The need for me to move into "twanged falsetto" is somewhere above tenor high c, but then again the terminology is a jungle. I don't really care for the terminology anymore, as long as it sound the way I want to.

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Right now I seem to be able to sing high songs fairly consistently (although not perfectly yet). A couple of years ago I could do it sometimes. Back then I was trying to figure out why I could sometimes do it and sometimes not. One of my theories was that I should simply "thin" the sound as I went up in pitch. Looking back, now I think that that theory was probably the most accurate and, like Marcus mentioned, in some ways, singing higher could be simplified to simply "thin out your voice as you go up". There was one song in yesterday's band practise in which I kind of forgot that and I failed miserably. I just tried having too thick a sound. Then in the next song I just tried using a lighter sound and that was really all it took. I think many of us don't simply realize how light a sound colour is being used in those rock tenor songs. The final mix makes it sound so thick and powerful, but if you were to isolate only the vocal track you'd usually hear a much thinner vocal sound than you'd expect.

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