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Mixed Voice: Where to start?

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JW10
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I've always been just a chest puller.  I didn't even realize that mixed voice even existed until a few weeks ago.  I've been a guitar player for years and not much of a singer but I'm trying to front my own band once I get back to school in the fall so I've been really putting in a ton of work on my singing recently.

For a baritone, I can belt pretty high, F4 comfortably and can touch A4.  I think My chest voice is developed fairly well.  I recently posted a sloppy clip in the Critique.  '&do=embed' frameborder='0' data-embedContent>>  However, for the styles I want to do: Rock, Funk, Soul, I realized that chest alone doesn't give me much versatility.  Especially since I cannot get up there like a tenor.
 

 

 

Anyways,
There is soooo much information about bridging the voices that I'm confused where to start.  It would be awesome if you guys could recommend me a few exercises or something.  
In addition, my head voice is not good.  I especially lose it after a long night of chest pulling.  I do not know whether this would stop me from developing a good mixed voice.

 

I really want to be able to get up there with power like Freddie Mercury or Dio.  

Thanks and sorry for the long post.

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I feel your pain pal. I admit I am not the one to ask about the technical stuff. I only do a couple "drills" regularly and even then just to address gaps in my range as I warm up. Those drills include slow, soft descending sirens from a yawn position, vocal fry occasionally and "guh" to get connectedness.

I was a serial chest puller as well. Didn't know any different. When I started to retrain my voice with the idea that I would try to build up the head voice and not strain anymore, I realized that I could not sing without my larynx moving up and down wildy following my pitch. For me, that was my first challenge. I started by singing whatever medium high note (right around my break) without engaging chest voice and without my larynx moving at all. Took me awhile (months) before I could move the pitch around and not have my larynx move. You may not have that problem. I basically sang for about six months with my finger resting on my adams apple just to make sure.

Here is where I'm sure people will have differing opinions but for me I decided that I would just sing songs in that challenging range with only disconnected head voice and neutral larynx. Not ever trying to connect with my chest voice. I started with only female singers. Bonnie Raitt for me because she stays in that medium range without doing too much crazy range stuff. Now keep in mind, this sounded like complete crap. For a long time. It started breathy and very hard to control but I was never worried about how it sounded. I only cared about hitting the right notes cleany, with no effort and a stable larynx. Eventually it got stronger and I could control the sound and flexibility more and more.

Getting the mix and connectedness wasn't that difficult for me after my head voice got fuller and more controlled. If I think in my head (apply "cry") I am connected and it sounds full and impressive. Much better for rock type stuff. Others can explain what cry is physiologically. I have no idea. I'm just looking for sensations that I can drill into muscle memory.

This worked for me. It took a loooong time. And I sing a lot. But now range isn't really an issue and the surprise was that now I can belt my "chest voice" like I used to and its sooo much better and easier.

So my advice would be look for drills that can help you but first and foremost, SING. Dont get too bogged down with technical stuff. If you don't strain and trust that your head voice will get stronger and stronger, you'll get there. Pushing chest by itself only goes so far and in my opinion will not get you where you want to go. Good luck.

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Anyways,

There is soooo much information about bridging the voices that I'm confused where to start.  It would be awesome if you guys could recommend me a few exercises or something.  

In addition, my head voice is not good.  I especially lose it after a long night of chest pulling.  I do not know whether this would stop me from developing a good mixed voice.

 

I really want to be able to get up there with power like Freddie Mercury or Dio.  

Thanks and sorry for the long post.

 

There is NO mixed voice JW10, you are either in "chest" or "head" you have to be in a voice that allows you to transition smoothly. So resonant and smooth that nobody can tell the difference. The whole mixed voice program stuff is a gimmick to take your money... most of us has been there. For me a seagull call "naw, naw, naw" has helped me free up the head voice. You will find it difficult to transition into a breathy falsetto, head voice must be made strong enough to match the lower voice. Get a good program, or coach, even free programs are out there but you've got to stick to that consistently and then sing! Mixed voice is the ability to transition between registers undetected. There's no click-click I am in mixed voice, everyday you've gotta make that transition till you know it like the back of your hand. 

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There is NO mixed voice JW10, you are either in "chest" or "head" you have to be in a voice that allows you to transition smoothly. So resonant and smooth that nobody can tell the difference. The whole mixed voice program stuff is a gimmick to take your money... most of us has been there. For me a seagull call "naw, naw, naw" has helped me free up the head voice. You will find it difficult to transition into a breathy falsetto, head voice must be made strong enough to match the lower voice. Get a good program, or coach, even free programs are out there but you've got to stick to that consistently and then sing! Mixed voice is the ability to transition between registers undetected. There's no click-click I am in mixed voice, everyday you've gotta make that transition till you know it like the back of your hand. 

 

 

Exactly what I was thinking. JW, if you want, I could post a song where I do that, because I do that all the time, and then explain how I went about it, but when it comes down to it, you just do a lot of re-arranging songs and singing them in a way where you use your entire voice.

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You actually sound like a tenor to me.  A tenor who hasn't developed head voice (it was the same for me).  Anyway, it doesn't matter if you were a baritone or tenor because baritones can go just as high as tenors.   

 

Learning how to bridge into head is probably the biggest topic on this forum.  It takes work, but the right kind of work.  If you get a program like Robert Lunte's Pillars, or took lessons from one of the many voice teachers on this forum like Robert or Daniel Formica, you can achieve this fairly quickly perhaps by Fall.  

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Exactly what I was thinking. JW, if you want, I could post a song where I do that, because I do that all the time, and then explain how I went about it, but when it comes down to it, you just do a lot of re-arranging songs and singing them in a way where you use your entire voice.

Yes please do!  I do feel a little lost on the whole thing.

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Also, being that I have a weak head voice, would it be possible to train the connecting notes first?; as that would be more useful to me to have a usable extension to my chest voice first.  Or is it necessary to work on my head voice first?  

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Yes please do!  I do feel a little lost on the whole thing.

 

It's confusing as hell if you have no one to point you in the right direction mate.  Trust me, I'm right there with you with the same exact problems but I am slowly being guided into the light. :D If you want my honest and best advice as a fellow guy following his dreams as a singer it's this: get a great vocal coach.  This forum is filled with them: Robert Lunte, DanielFormica, FelipeCarvalho, Jens, etc.  If you are really serious about getting some progress and not wasting your time, talk to one of these guys.  One of them will be happy to help you I'm sure.  

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You actually sound like a tenor to me.  A tenor who hasn't developed head voice (it was the same for me).  Anyway, it doesn't matter if you were a baritone or tenor because baritones can go just as high as tenors.   

 

Learning how to bridge into head is probably the biggest topic on this forum.  It takes work, but the right kind of work.  If you get a program like Robert Lunte's Pillars, or took lessons from one of the many voice teachers on this forum like Robert or Daniel Formica, you can achieve this fairly quickly perhaps by Fall.  

 

 

Yea im preety sure he is Tenor. Bro just because you cant sing high NOW that doesent mean you are a Bari. Im tenor and i can sing up to A4 Max, not even sing, but sing that note here or there. Being tenor doesent automatically means you belt C5 like its noones bussiness xD

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Also, being that I have a weak head voice, would it be possible to train the connecting notes first?; as that would be more useful to me to have a usable extension to my chest voice first.  Or is it necessary to work on my head voice first?  

Depends on what your teacher thinks. And whether or not you can trust his advice. You are already directing, in your statement, how your training will go, which may or may not be fine. But it is a good question to ask.

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Also, being that I have a weak head voice, would it be possible to train the connecting notes first?; as that would be more useful to me to have a usable extension to my chest voice first.  Or is it necessary to work on my head voice first?  

 

You might be a little confused about this.  You want a "single" voice so that your chest voice sounds like it is totally connected all the way up to C6 or beyond.

 

Typically a beginner's head voice sounds very weak compared with their chest voice - thats normal.  The styles that you said you wanted to be able to sing will require the seamless connection between chest and head.  That connection point will require you to thin out Chest and strengthen Head so that the adduction in Chest and Head is the same at the transition point.

 

This transition can be at a low pitch (like E4) or a high point (like A4) depending on loudness.  Some people learn this switch at a high loud point (that's how I first learned) or you can learn it at a lower pitch.  I think it is better to learn the transition at a lower point singing lightly.  Once you get it down at a low volume you can start to increase loudness.

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Funny thing. I usually have a hard time transitioning around D4-E4. It feels so much better when I'm around F#4-G4-G#4 to start transitioning...and I usually can barely sing E5-F5 depending on the song, although I've been able to sing a note in G5 once or twice...  

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Ok.  Singing a chest voice D4 requires me to be LOUD.  But, I can barely even sing a D4 in head voice.  Am I supposed to be learn to transition at full volume right away?

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And what if you try to lower the volume of this D4 on "chest" somehow?

​Either my voice cracks horribly or I Simply cannot reach the note.

I order for me to connect my registers I need to sing at like a whisper.

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​I did a little snippet from a Maxwell song. There's a lot of switching in this song. I start in chest, go up to head, then switch back and forth between falsetto and head, and I think I throw  little more chest in at the end.

 

http://picosong.com/X84f/

​GSoul, This link doesn't work for me.

 

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I've always been just a chest puller.  I didn't even realize that mixed voice even existed until a few weeks ago.  I've been a guitar player for years and not much of a singer but I'm trying to front my own band once I get back to school in the fall so I've been really putting in a ton of work on my singing recently.

For a baritone, I can belt pretty high, F4 comfortably and can touch A4.  I think My chest voice is developed fairly well.  I recently posted a sloppy clip in the Critique.  '&do=embed' frameborder='0' data-embedContent>>  However, for the styles I want to do: Rock, Funk, Soul, I realized that chest alone doesn't give me much versatility.  Especially since I cannot get up there like a tenor.
 

 

 

Anyways,
There is soooo much information about bridging the voices that I'm confused where to start.  It would be awesome if you guys could recommend me a few exercises or something.  
In addition, my head voice is not good.  I especially lose it after a long night of chest pulling.  I do not know whether this would stop me from developing a good mixed voice.

 

I really want to be able to get up there with power like Freddie Mercury or Dio.  

Thanks and sorry for the long post.

​JW

Regarding the term "Mixed Voice"... also, there is a full 5 page essay on this topic in my book, "The Four Pillars of Singing".

The issue with "mixed voice" is primarily this... In order to really understand or teach "mixed voice" you have to understand formants and the acoustics of singing because it is referring to the physical sensation we all have when the formant is shifting between F1 and F2. That is the REALITY behind the term "mixed voice"... however, because it deals with vocal formants and acoustics, it is the most challenging thing to understand about singing. Nothing is more challenging and confusing to understand then formants... for this reason, sadly... most voice teachers cannot explain what formants are... therefore, they do not really understand what "mixed voice" means.  So what happens is... students don't understand what "mixed voice" really means... this has led to a very sad and pathetic problem... teachers teaching students that "mixed voice" means or implies, "mystery third register between chest and head".

There is even a popular vocal training program by one of my colleagues that has helped to propagate this confusion as well. A major vocal training program that teaches "mixed voice", but doesn't actually explain really what it is or means, let alone, anything about vocal formants. It would be like me making a training program called, "Financial Planning"... and talking about how to balance your check book. 

There actually is a "mixed" physical sensation as the formant shifts from F1 to F2, but I am not in favor of this term "mixed voice" because it has been abused and turned into something that means, "mystery 3rd voice between chest and head" that is nothing more then complete BS that is confusing students of singing. I am not arguing that there is no mixed voice, only that the term "mixed voice" has been abused and misunderstood. It is similar to another post that was made recently about the term, "Bel Canto"... another example of a term that has been abused because it has marketing "buzz" potential when used in the wrong context. The propagation of confusing and erroneous definitions of certain terms, benefits some people more then the real definition. As long as it impresses students, the accuracy doesn't matter to some people. I know that sounds a bit cynical, but... that is a part of the business that does exist and I am more then happy to call people out on it. ;)

This video is a bit dated, before I learned to dress better for videos... was spent after a 10 hour day of teaching. :ph34r:  

This video is therefore slated to be redone in a few weeks, but it gets the point across. It is shameful to toss around terms, when you really don't know what your talking about, if you are an educator.

 


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