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sounding to quacky even with the wind and release onset

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Jarom
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Lately my voice has been very quacky. I know this is because I am using to much twang. However when I do a wind and release onset it just sounds airy and quacky. I have also tried dampening my larynx to eliminate quacking and that just makes it dopey and quacky. Another thing I have been trying out is using less twang and relying more on lower ab muscles like in the wind and release onset but that feels very tense to me. if twang helps with compression how can you get a lot of compression without sounding quacky?

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Lately my voice has been very quacky. I know this is because I am using to much twang. However when I do a wind and release onset it just sounds airy and quacky. I have also tried dampening my larynx to eliminate quacking and that just makes it dopey and quacky. Another thing I have been trying out is using less twang and relying more on lower ab muscles like in the wind and release onset but that feels very tense to me. if twang helps with compression how can you get a lot of compression without sounding quacky?

​Thanks Elvis...

Jarom, please have the courtesy of providing a sound sample. C'mon buddy?! Do your part... thanks.

In the meantime,

1). A W&R onset does not remove compression. It is not a means to stop sounding quacky... the "quackiness" is happening after your onset. W&R onsets don't reduce twang. They have no influence over your compression after the onset.

  I have also tried dampening my larynx to eliminate quacking and that just makes it dopey and quacky.

2). Because your not dampening your larynx, your dumping your larynx and yes, thats why it sound dopey and quacky now. Don't dump, dampen... if it doesn't sound pleasing, something isn't right. You should be able to fix a problem like that very simply by asking yourself if it sounds good or not... there is no mystery here in regards to dumping or dampening the larynx if you know the difference... which Im assuming you do.

3). Im not going to just spoon feed it to you.. NO!  Im going to force you to go into your copy of "The Four Pillars of Singing" and videos and find the answer to this, which it is clearly pointed out in the program. I made a big deal out of clarifying this point for TVS clients... there is about three pages on the topic and a video that addresses this. 

I will give you a hint... there are 2 "systems" that product vocal fold adduction... one is contracting the twanger and the other is... ?  And in order to get that to work for you, you have to... ?  And if you do that... you will get your compression without sounding too quacky. 

;)

... which comes back to a more fundamental cause of all these symptoms... and that is, you need to increase or improve your ______ .

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Ok this is me goofing around with one of my songs. It shows allot of the quacky sounds i'm talking about. Theres compression with twang and theres compressions with your excintric? exentric? exsintric? However you spell them muscles. I have found that there are good and bad parts to bolth of them, but I cant seem to put them together to get all the good and less bad, it seems like one or the other to me..... I know this probably isnt the case but its the problem I have been working out recently.

 

http://vocaroo.com/i/s1nIvQj9ptla

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I'm gonna answer Robert's question, since this very subject (excessive larynx dumping, dopiness) came up in our lesson this weekend.

Namely the other mechanism for achieving vocal fold adduction is the bournelli affect, which results from sufficient air flow, which is achieved by execution of proper appoggio.

 

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I'm gonna answer Robert's question, since this very subject (excessive larynx dumping, dopiness) came up in our lesson this weekend.

Namely the other mechanism for achieving vocal fold adduction is the bournelli affect, which results from sufficient air flow, which is achieved by execution of proper appoggio.

 

​yes the bournelli effect and twang......

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Yes guys... thats it... we always want to have some twang activated, generally, and twang tends to be the more intuitive system... we tend to neglect respiration and good Bernoulli fold closure, but if you do, the body will compensate by squeezing harder on the AES and turning the beautiful swan of twang into the ugly duckling of quack.

In summary Jarom, improve your respiration, specifically, the sub-glottal pressure... 

Good call Greg... you nailed it. 

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