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How to fade out high out-belted voice? (Video link below)

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So, I've been browsing youtube and found this amazing singer. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ns4S57wXxI He was actually a policeman from the Philippines. However, I find his vocals really special and trained. Can this set of singing skills be achieved through years of singing? Or it needs some kind of training? He is likely a tenor to me. He had this sweet, soft sound mixed with a very nice vibrato. 

Going back to the question, is there a term for what he did at the last line? The high, belted? note. Specifically, the "how 'MUCH' I love you" part. The very last part, the ending. I think it was a kind of a shift from chesty mix, to a head tone. Is that really it? And what do you use to call it? How is it achieved? Or is it just a "diminuendo"? Confused right now, tbh. Haha

Thanks for the replies! :)

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The big "Much" was achieved by his lightening or letting off of his vocal fold adduction level (essentially a decrescendo) with a commensurate support adjustment which adjusts his air pressure to fit together with the lighter fold engagement. That volume change actually called for more diaphragmatic support than the power note.  There's a pressure differential that has to be dealt with.

This is absolutely an advanced skill in singing and decrescendo is more difficult than a crescendo.

From personal experience, this one really calls for a vocal teacher experienced in a technique known as mesa di voce.  

 

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The big "Much" was achieved by his lightening or letting off of his vocal fold adduction level (essentially a decrescendo) with a commensurate support adjustment which adjusts his air pressure to fit together with the lighter fold engagement. That volume change actually called for more diaphragmatic support than the power note.  There's a pressure differential that has to be dealt with.

This is absolutely an advanced skill in singing and decrescendo is more difficult than a crescendo.

From personal experience, this one really calls for a vocal teacher experienced in a technique known as mesa di voce.  

 

I've made progress towards a crescendo in bridge and above areas but the decrescendo is a train wreck with no progress. :D

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You guys are cool. Haha will look into it then. I can sort of like do a decrescendo like that, but I just can't figure out that shift like soind and how to do it. I just usually close my mouth to reduce volume and. Power. I really want that shift thingy. Haha its like a drop of pressure from the diaphragm but what ever I di, I still can't do it. :/ 

 

And regarding about that meza di voce teacher, does a chorale instructor know about stuff like training a meza voce? I already heard about this meza voce when researching about operatic techniques and things. Just don't know that this decrescendo technique was under meza voce. Anywy, thanks!!

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Slash,

That skill can take years to develop.  It's a goal of an opera singer and many still cannot do it.

If you sing big or have a heavier weight voice, the difficulty becomes even greater. 

But it can be practised.  Take small baby steps using less of a volume span.  Also, some vowels work better than others.  You have to experiment to see which ones work for you to get going. 

Swelling is a great exercise in and of itself!

Try:

Soft to loud 

Loud to soft

Soft to loud and back to soft

 You can't let go of your support to lighten (decrescendo) because the air pressure drop will leave your folds with no breath energy.

A good choir teacher is likely to help.

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