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The Highest and The Lowest Note You Ever Hit?

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Muzikant
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I really don't care much about range, but for people who do, why would anyone make a topic like this and tell and not show. It really brings to mind another topic,  "How big is your X? Right?' :lol: Anyway, for people who want bunch of noises from low to high, I warmed up today, so here some.

 

https://app.box.com/s/j9sdd9ob0xl04my4rkq1i3vo3xgqv9p7

 

Technically I believe vocal fry is cheating though. It might sound lower, but it isn't modal in the way the frequencies operate. It has a frequency occurring two octaves down from whatever modal voice is bleeding through from what I understand. It's kind of like rasp in that it adds frequencies but isn't modal or cohesive in the way that it builds off a fundamental.

 

Anyway, I'm all for artists having creative freedom and choosing pitches and timbres and which representative their art.  But how many people actually apply this? Some people use kind of gutteral sounds in some kind of heavy metal. It's usually not very melodic though. I might use a whistle in a harmony or something? Maybe there are artistic applications we haven't thought of yet. Otherwise, is this like how big is your X? I think I've got about 2.5 to 3 octaves that I like to use.

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Who cares? You'll never use those notes in songs!!!!

​Herecy! The whole point of singing is to be better than other singers. The way to achieve that is to sing higher and lower notes than other people. You see, it's a sport not an art!

For me, A2 to F5 in "full voice", C6 in falsetto. Not really mind blowing, or vocal chord blowing yet...

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Lowest note I have ever produced was A1. But that was from frying on an A2 and letting the beats synchronize. If you do it just right the vocal folds will adjust to a true modal coordination.

The highest was an A5. Each of these was a one time deal........

 

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I really don't care much about range, but for people who do, why would anyone make a topic like this and tell and not show.

​Because this was not competition who can sing higher or lower note! I was just curious about extremes :) I don´t  care for range as well,I´ve made few songs and they are all below my break (a4). But i like to scream when I am home alone ;)

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I can easily sing songs with G2 sounding good with no problem. I used to be able to sing and vocalize only down to A2. But I can vocalize down to F2 with no Fry. The highest note I ever vocalized was a G5 (full head voice), but singing in a song was a F5 (still improving the sound quality). I believe that I would be happy when I'm able to sing G5s consistently, and would stop obsessing/working on expanding my range. After all, I could sing pretty much 99.9% of my favorite hard rock songs. :P

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I'm sorry to say this but singing is not a competition...

​ And that is one of the reasons I do not watch the shows like Xfactor and The Voice. There was once a show that would take unknowns and you could see the process of polishing and bringing out the star which dwelled inside. I watched that one....Can't remember the name.... The networks did not like it..... They could not package the new "Star" quick enough.., Cancelled the show.......

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I think it is a lot more interesting what the highest and lowest notes are that you can connect smoothly with your chest voice, through a siren for example. I have been down to something like C0 when the resonance was kind of flipping around the fundamental on a C1. I also have squeaked out something like C7 on the high end.

But both notes are not within my consistent range and I can make neither of them intiontionally. At least the C0 is also basically unusable live because it is just too quiet. I also can't connect to them smoothly from my chest voice.

I can connect from G1 up to G5 on a quite consistent basis and all of those notes are kind of usable in a live setting. I can make notes lower than G1 quite consistently, but they need too much amplification to be usable (even the G1-C2 area gets critical when loud instruments are involved). A5 is already in my whistle voice and I have not really learned yet how to connect that smoothly with my head voice (I have even heard it is basically impossible if you use a "loud" head voice).

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G8 in the shower(got soap water in My eyes) lowest C1-G0, whenever i sleep i usually talk in this low demonic voice. My gf recorded it once and was around C1-G0 

​I always knew you are secretly possessed by some demonic beast, Jens. Now we have the proof... :P

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Technically I believe vocal fry is cheating though. It might sound lower, but it isn't modal in the way the frequencies operate. It has a frequency occurring two octaves down from whatever modal voice is bleeding through from what I understand. It's kind of like rasp in that it adds frequencies but isn't modal or cohesive in the way that it builds off a fundamental.

​Keep in mind that basically all notes below D2 have that "fryish" sound because people's ears start to percieve the single "clicks" of the vocal fold. So what sounds like fry may still be modal voice down there. 

Also, if you mix the fry quality into your modal voice down there, you can make a pretty smooth transition. Here is me going down, where do you think is the switch from M1 to M0:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/69231116/E2-E1.mp3

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In the morning, E2-E4 (can't quite bridge without warming up). After warming up sufficiently, usually an F#2-A5 (Bb5 rarely, but I'm not a fan of this note).

Still quite amazed that people can sing down to the first octave, and I thought my voice was low...

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