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Head Resonance

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Elvis
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Guys one simple question.

when releasing to head and upper pallet placement i have an issue regarding some theoretical and technical info.

in other words if i sing in my upper register and im in "head", now if i ppinch my nose should i feel the sound change or not.

i think im mistaking nasality with head placement.

SO my question would be: if i pinch my nose should the sound change when im trying to sing in head voice or not.

My guess is not, but i just figured that out so im not sure xD

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It should not change, as long as what you are trying to do is a oral vowel of course, on nasal vowels and consonants it will and must change.

 

Now, when you are nasal in the manner you are right now, does the higher range works well, or are you having problems with it (the nasalance is not helping)? I ask because its related, but its indeed not the same. Or better yet, we want something very specific, nasalance can happen in a number of different ways.

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I think sometimes, when you try to go for a more pharyngeal sound, you might make it nasal without realising it. It used to happen to me. The short answer is no, head resonance is not necessarily nasal.

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Ok so the thing is. Im trying to expand my range. And i know this is a slow proccess and im not rushing anywhere.

 

What happens is i can sometimes phonate a preety resonant and full C5 or even D5, but as soon as i try it again it falls apart. But when i do manage to do it it always feels like its really a head placement and free. So the problem occurs when im trying to do it again and consistently. And what i noticed when i do try it again its really nasal and almost whiney.

 

P.S. I am applying for Croatian The Voice, and i got accepted on the online applicattion, now what follows is First Circle where i have to sing 2 songs in front of a jury, then if i pass that i need to sing 3 songs in the second circle to be able to proceed to the Blind Auditions, so im trying to fix some stuff before i have to perform in front of them.

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Elvis just a heads up, I'm not trying to put you off going for The Voice but I have been a product on the XFactor UK.

I will tell you out of honesty that they already know what they want. I made it to the final 54 at bootcamp last year and learned a few details about the show.

One contestant was already told by the judge he'd get to the live shows and he did. I was asked to be signed to Sony/SYCO and put into a band and taken on to Britain's Got Talent as a free platform for them to launch us and then they were going to remove us and act like they signed us. That deal fell through when a member of the band decided he didn't like it.

The TV talent shows are very very very convoluted. 

If anything, go for the experience, connections with meeting people and most of all be confident. If they say no, do not let it defeat you. There are a lot of empty promises within these sort of platforms. I was lucky to get to the stage I got to. I was informed post audition infront of 5000 people at bootcamp that the producers wanted a reaction from me on stage and wanted to me cause a scene.

I made it through 8 stages of auditions and on the TV they cut it down to 1 audition and made it out to be that I never made it past the first audition. Yet they showed me in pretty much every episode in the background and even at bootcamp waiting to sing.

Do not bust your balls for these types of things, take it as a learning process.

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Yea i am deffinatelly looking at it as just an experience, i have no expectations from it...its more for fun than anything else.

 

Also i ahve a friend who went on last years the voice and x factor and he told me there is far far less drama in the voice. I just wanna know how far can i go NOW (which is probably where i am at now xD).

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It should not change, as long as what you are trying to do is a oral vowel of course, on nasal vowels and consonants it will and must change.

 

Now, when you are nasal in the manner you are right now, does the higher range works well, or are you having problems with it (the nasalance is not helping)? I ask because its related, but its indeed not the same. Or better yet, we want something very specific, nasalance can happen in a number of different ways.

​Felipe I have a follow up question to this though - if I singer were to chose an approach that involves a bit of nasality for the style, are there certain situations where they have to give up all the nasality in order to go higher smoothly without problems or ugly sound, or can they keep it all the way through?

Let's say the average male voice with training, is singing an R&B song with some quiet passages around G4-G5, some medium passages around E4-E5, and some loud passages between C4-C5. For each of those intensities, at what parts of those ranges would the nasality start giving them trouble, or is it fair game during everything?

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Definitely listen to D Starr.  I saw the episode where Simon Cowell ripped him up and they looked down their noses at him, though he made it a few more rounds. It is a set-up, it is drama, reality tv is not real. But you do get some experience in the industry and some contacts.

 

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It should not change, as long as what you are trying to do is a oral vowel of course, on nasal vowels and consonants it will and must change.

 

Now, when you are nasal in the manner you are right now, does the higher range works well, or are you having problems with it (the nasalance is not helping)? I ask because its related, but its indeed not the same. Or better yet, we want something very specific, nasalance can happen in a number of different ways.

​Felipe I have a follow up question to this though - if I singer were to chose an approach that involves a bit of nasality for the style, are there certain situations where they have to give up all the nasality in order to go higher smoothly without problems or ugly sound, or can they keep it all the way through?

Let's say the average male voice with training, is singing an R&B song with some quiet passages around G4-G5, some medium passages around E4-E5, and some loud passages between C4-C5. For each of those intensities, at what parts of those ranges would the nasality start giving them trouble, or is it fair game during everything?

​You can keep it, taking care with some vowels (EE becomes quite weird). Its important to understand that the control of nasal/oral is related to the problem, but its not a problem or a solution in itself.


I would resume it to this:

On the high range, the back of tongue needs to elevate to a certain extent, and for a lot of people that coordination will be the same they would use to produce a KIND of nasalance.

A kind, because nasal/oral flow can be controled by opening and closing the velar port AND the oral airway, the later is controled by opening and closing the mouth, and, by lifting or lowering the tongue.

This is one example of where individuality plays a big role, to which extent does each of us use each of these mechanisms? I don't know which of these Elvis will do more when going more or less nasal, for example. I am suspecting it because of what he said: difference between nasal and "head voice", but its still a guess. He may be already doing what is necessary in this regard and going overboard because another aspect like support is not working well...

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I think Felipe is spot on. It is very important HOW the nasality is produced. Many people have a natural tendency to leave the velar port open when they go for a stronger twang (which is triggered by lifting the back of the tongue). It is not a requirement to do so, just some individual tendency that lots of people have. In a case like that, nasality is not a problem at all.

However, the velar port can also stay open if you have unneccessary tension around that area, which pulls it down. This is actually bad because the movement of the velar port is often coupled with a movement of the larynx. It is, again, often a natural tendency to raise the soft palate when the larynx goes down and to lower it when the larynx goes up. If the soft palate is "locked" in a low position it can be an indication that your larynx is "locked" in a high position. In that case its not the nasality per sé that is "bad", but it is a result of another bad thing.

Nasality can also be good to some degree though, especially when singing in a lowered larynx position. In the high range it is important that your soft palate does not go up too much, because it creates unneccessary space in the vocal tract and it can hinder the twang mechanism. Because of the tendency to raise the palate when singing with a low larynx, singing with a lowered larynx may create the problem of a too high palate. In this case it can help to intentionally sing with nasality, to be sure the palate is low. I even heard from some classical teachers that tell their tenor students to go for "10% of the air released through the nose" on high notes to ensure the palate is not too high.

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