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In ear monitors making me sing out of tune?

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Hi all, I was wondering of anyone could help me, I've recently been hired as a session vocalist and I am having to use in ear monitors which is new to me, now I finished my gig but I was very aware that during a couple of songs I was singing out of key for the first hew lines until I caught myself and corrected it.  I was wondering if anyone else had had a simmiler experience and wether there if something I could do or just general in ear monitor advice.  

I never have this problem with normal monitors or in practice and I would very much not like to have it at all!

Thanks in advance,

Danny.

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Yeah either try and cut some of the lower frequencies out or boost the high end. I'm not sure how in ear monitors are controlled. But when I've recorded stuff through my little home studio set up, cutting  the low end really helped me.

Also.. upload a profile picture. Any will do. Just go onto Google and find anything.

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I'll upload a picture tonight, don't worry.  And thanks for the advice, I'll give it a shot.  Don't suppose you know if there are any relatively cheap earphones that have a low bass response?  Might be helpful when the sound engineer is not. 

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Yeah either try and cut some of the lower frequencies out or boost the high end. I'm not sure how in ear monitors are controlled. But when I've recorded stuff through my little home studio set up, cutting  the low end really helped me.

Also.. upload a profile picture. Any will do. Just go onto Google and find anything.

Sounds like a good idea. What I found, when I would sing with a backing track when I was using Audacity, I would take the left headphone can off, pan hard right and drop the bass a little bit to keep myself in tune.

 

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I'll upload a picture tonight, don't worry.  And thanks for the advice, I'll give it a shot.  Don't suppose you know if there are any relatively cheap earphones that have a low bass response?  Might be helpful when the sound engineer is not. 

Fun pic :D

Sorry.. I have no-idea about in ear monitors. Never used them! 

Sounds like a good idea. What I found, when I would sing with a backing track when I was using Audacity, I would take the left headphone can off, pan hard right and drop the bass a little bit to keep myself in tune.

Hey I used to take one headphone can off after reading online how much it helped people hear themselves properly. I also saw that many famous musicians do this every time they record. But after a while a thought to myself... "I'd much rather record with both cans on. That has to be the natural way." So I started looking online and started messing with the EQ on my microphone track and it helped. It might take a bit getting used to. But I find that I get a better take with both cans on because you hear both the left and right channels.. I just get into the music more that way. I also watched a Ken Tamplin video on his youtube channel where he talked about recording with headphones and he said that it's best to have both cans on because there's a slight pitch difference when listening through the headphones and having them off. So if you have one on and one off, you might sing slightly flat because of the pitch difference. True? I don't know. I haven't looked into it enough. But I think it feels more natural having both on.. that's why there's two! :) 

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I'll upload a picture tonight, don't worry.  And thanks for the advice, I'll give it a shot.  Don't suppose you know if there are any relatively cheap earphones that have a low bass response?  Might be helpful when the sound engineer is not. 

Fun pic :D

Sorry.. I have no-idea about in ear monitors. Never used them! 

Sounds like a good idea. What I found, when I would sing with a backing track when I was using Audacity, I would take the left headphone can off, pan hard right and drop the bass a little bit to keep myself in tune.

Hey I used to take one headphone can off after reading online how much it helped people hear themselves properly. I also saw that many famous musicians do this every time they record. But after a while a thought to myself... "I'd much rather record with both cans on. That has to be the natural way." So I started looking online and started messing with the EQ on my microphone track and it helped. It might take a bit getting used to. But I find that I get a better take with both cans on because you hear both the left and right channels.. I just get into the music more that way. I also watched a Ken Tamplin video on his youtube channel where he talked about recording with headphones and he said that it's best to have both cans on because there's a slight pitch difference when listening through the headphones and having them off. So if you have one on and one off, you might sing slightly flat because of the pitch difference. True? I don't know. I haven't looked into it enough. But I think it feels more natural having both on.. that's why there's two! :) 

Ken's advice is spot on. Having one on and one off screws with your equilibrium and perception of pitch. Sing into the cans. It's a complete ego breaker when you first start doing it but it will make you a better singer. The other piece of advice is to not have the backing music so loud that you cannot hear the inflections of the voice and dynamic. There are also clips of Dio and Steve Perry asking for the tracks to be turned down for this exact reason. It will also help you to not oversing. Over singing is a cool thing to do sometimes but it's something you want in your toolbox not something that you want to become a habit.

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Pitch perception on sources that are very close to your ears can be disrupted, I don´t know why, but I know the effect very well. I trained myself by setting a loudspeaker AND a headphone mix of a song to go on at the same time, then I would sing with phones on and off, and keep checking for differences.

Record yourself doing both and find a place where when with the phones it mess up your pitch, then sing that place without the phones, then with them back on, and try to notice the differences.

Hahaha when I first found out I had this issue was exactly when using in ear monitors on a band rehearsal hahaha. The band stoped playing midway and they were all looking at me like "dude, wtf are you doing bro?". Hahaha :) 

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I'm not sure I understand what's going on. It's possible to get your pitch messed up by using IEMs? I normally just use ear plugs to make sure I can still hear myself in a rehearsal/live setting and I haven't had issues with those.

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