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Hi Folks, I have been working on my technique over the last weeks.  For the first time in my life, I enrolled with a teacher.  Since there is a paucity of good western classical teachers where I live, I decided to go to a Hindustani vocal coach(traditional Indian music).  For the last two weeks, I only do scales with "Sa Re Ga Ma", which is Indian equivalent of "Do Re Me"

My vocal warm up is entirely in the C3 to C4 region only. I do this in the mornings for an hour.  I am frankly surprised at the results.  Despite warming up only my chest voice I can feel tension free voice in my entire vocal range after that.  I am able to lose weight and this has helped both my pitch accuracy as well as my bridging.  

Why is it that warm up in the chest voice frees up the voice in the entire vocal range?  It seems to work for me, but I want to ensure that this is the right thing to do.. 

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Because it's an easier and more intuitive area to warm up and remind yourself how to support, resonate, etc. So when you're ready and "warmed up" (ingrained the coordination) the high range is there. It's like a car engine on a cold morning. Let it sit on neutral for a while, and when you take off the high speeds are there, you just gotta press on the gas... And steer.

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@aravin

That looks good, if you work your technique with comfort you can be much more precise, you will also be able to use more energy without forcing, you can articulate better, etc.

I must have said this thosands of times in this forum already, there is nothing you have to do on the high range that is not present on the low area in one way or another, its just different amounts.

If you don't mind, I would like to know what you are doing with more detail :) . If you find time later to describe the exercises you were issued by your coach I would really appreciate it.

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Interesting. I often neglect the lower chest range in my warm-ups, trying to get the body used to bridging as soon as possible before I sing. I'll incorporate more lower chest runs in future. I initially had the fear that if I kept working my chest voice, I'd get used to singing with more weight, which is the opposite of what I want to do.

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Yeah. Some coaches sell the "use it or lose it" mentality. It's funny, the less I've been grinding at the area I struggle in and focused on refining what I already do best, the more I've started to get a solid handle on the areas that were shaky.

And Felipe. I've been using something you said as mantra, but I can't remember it word for word. It went along the lines of "high or low, nothing in the projection should change." I take this to mean something like

To keep a tonality steady all throughout the range, support must stay consistent/unchanged and the only thing moving should be the folds, but you can't really feel them move so it doesn't matter.

Also, after my epiphany with totally disregarding vowel modifications and favoring forced tension release singing has become much, much easier.

Oh snap! I just came up with a slogan! You ready for this shit?

"The only thing during singing that should be forced (dramatic pause) is tension release." - Khasserafutse

I should SO write a book.

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Better slap on some super high protection factor sunblock, son, you are basking in the light of my infinite wisdom. #khasfutseforprez

i can feel the skin cancer appearing all over me...thats how hot is is

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Hi Folks, I have been working on my technique over the last weeks.  For the first time in my life, I enrolled with a teacher.  Since there is a paucity of good western classical teachers where I live, I decided to go to a Hindustani vocal coach(traditional Indian music).  For the last two weeks, I only do scales with "Sa Re Ga Ma", which is Indian equivalent of "Do Re Me"

My vocal warm up is entirely in the C3 to C4 region only. I do this in the mornings for an hour.  I am frankly surprised at the results.  Despite warming up only my chest voice I can feel tension free voice in my entire vocal range after that.  I am able to lose weight and this has helped both my pitch accuracy as well as my bridging.  

Why is it that warm up in the chest voice frees up the voice in the entire vocal range?  It seems to work for me, but I want to ensure that this is the right thing to do.. 

    A lot of people have been saying for quite some time to get the lower area solid and the highs will follow......Felipe, Daniel, Robert, Martin.....to mention a few......It has even been commented that most new singers go for the "I want more high range" approach and disregard the low end thinking that they do not need to train the low end.........A good foundation is essential to reach the heights.........

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@aravin

That looks good, if you work your technique with comfort you can be much more precise, you will also be able to use more energy without forcing, you can articulate better, etc.

I must have said this thosands of times in this forum already, there is nothing you have to do on the high range that is not present on the low area in one way or another, its just different amounts.

If you don't mind, I would like to know what you are doing with more detail :) . If you find time later to describe the exercises you were issued by your coach I would really appreciate it.

This is why I love this forum.  A great singer like Felipe is still so humble and willing to listen to new stuff!  Even from a rookie!  Obviously, Felipe, I mean it as a compliment and this is a lesson for all of us aspiring singers.  I am able to understand what you mean when you say "there is nothing you have to do on the high range that is not present on the low area in one way or another, its just different amounts." 

I am out of station, I will post a recording next week.  But Felipe, what my instructor has me do is Major scale runs "Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni Sa" across the octave from C3 to C4(Or visualize the notes as 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 if that is easier for you where 1 is C3 and 8 is C4 on a Major scale).  You basically start with 

1.  Sa.....(only one note) 2.  Sa..Re... 3.. Sa Re... Sa(full octave sweep)  4.  Then you do permutations  like 1231212 2342323 all the way to the octave and also descend on same notes... You can do any permutation, but in general the larger the gap between subsequent notes like for e.g. if you wanted to do 14123 25234 etc it is way more difficult and takes a lot of practice.  Especially when descending down in the scale.

What this helps to do is to build muscle memory for not just the actual notes, but also the relative notes.  In Hindustani music, microtonal Ragas(or scales) are the fundamental building blocks.  You can see an example below of this kind of singing.  This will be very very different from contemporary singing, but to sing like this, you need to train the muscle memory for the microtone scales.. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0E02bnvo80

Interesting. I often neglect the lower chest range in my warm-ups, trying to get the body used to bridging as soon as possible before I sing. I'll incorporate more lower chest runs in future. I initially had the fear that if I kept working my chest voice, I'd get used to singing with more weight, which is the opposite of what I want to do.

Rotlung, it was pleasantly surprising for me also.  I always used to jump to passagio thinking that that is the most difficult part to warm up.  What I feel based on whatever little I have experimented is that the difficulty in bridging comes from unnecessary vocal weight/tension(in the chest register).  I find that by doing this, automatically I am able to bridge easily.  I don't need to do anything different.  But obviously, this is because at my current stage of evolution, I have developed the ability to sing with co-ordination and strengths in my head voice(or covered "head voice" as Rob would call it).  Simply doing scales between C3 and C4 may not help a person belt out C5, but my understanding is that I may be able to sing between E4 and C5 more easily when I am fully warmed up in the C3 to C4 area.  It is worth an experiment

Hi Folks, I have been working on my technique over the last weeks.  For the first time in my life, I enrolled with a teacher.  Since there is a paucity of good western classical teachers where I live, I decided to go to a Hindustani vocal coach(traditional Indian music).  For the last two weeks, I only do scales with "Sa Re Ga Ma", which is Indian equivalent of "Do Re Me"

My vocal warm up is entirely in the C3 to C4 region only. I do this in the mornings for an hour.  I am frankly surprised at the results.  Despite warming up only my chest voice I can feel tension free voice in my entire vocal range after that.  I am able to lose weight and this has helped both my pitch accuracy as well as my bridging.  

Why is it that warm up in the chest voice frees up the voice in the entire vocal range?  It seems to work for me, but I want to ensure that this is the right thing to do.. 

    A lot of people have been saying for quite some time to get the lower area solid and the highs will follow......Felipe, Daniel, Robert, Martin.....to mention a few......It has even been commented that most new singers go for the "I want more high range" approach and disregard the low end thinking that they do not need to train the low end.........A good foundation is essential to reach the heights.........

Yes, MDEW, this is what I am realizing.  It is more fancy to blast full sounding high notes, but I have been guilty of trying to do this too :) 

Because it's an easier and more intuitive area to warm up and remind yourself how to support, resonate, etc. So when you're ready and "warmed up" (ingrained the coordination) the high range is there. It's like a car engine on a cold morning. Let it sit on neutral for a while, and when you take off the high speeds are there, you just gotta press on the gas... And steer.

That makes  a lot of sense, when you put it that way.  

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"To keep a tonality steady all throughout the range, support must stay consistent/unchanged and the only thing moving should be the folds."

Respectfully, I have to disagree.

 

If you keep the tonality the same, what's different singing high than singing low?

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"To keep a tonality steady all throughout the range, support must stay consistent/unchanged and the only thing moving should be the folds."

Respectfully, I have to disagree.

 

If you keep the tonality the same, what's different singing high than singing low?

"To keep a tonality steady all throughout the range, support must stay consistent/unchanged and the only thing moving should be the folds."

Respectfully, I have to disagree.

 

If you keep the tonality the same, what's different singing high than singing low?

fold closure

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To me, saying the subglottal pressure changes is like saying "the pitch will change." If the air pressure from the lungs stays the same but the gap between the folds narrows then the pressure, along with the pitch, will change. Oh, and the air in front of your mouth will also change to warmer. What else that in no way answers what I'm trying to get at can we think of? Or maybe I just need to study more, I clearly have no idea how to carry the knowledge of the subglottal pressure change into my practice.

I'm saying if you keep the sound/tone quality the same, nothing conscious has to change. At least not dramatically. I thought that was the whole point of lip bubbles. To give you a cue, an easy sound to follow and focus on keeping a steady airflow even though the folds adduct.

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Sorry Khas...My comment was regarding the support.  It depends on what you are singing or doing with your voice.  For example, just a simple vowel change can affect your breath management and couple that with, let's say an intensity change, even moreso.

As a singer we are constantly dealing with pressure changes.  Some songs can really put you to the test.

 

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Sorry Khas...My comment was regarding the support.  It depends on what you are singing or doing with your voice.  For example, just a simple vowel change can affect your breath management and couple that with, let's say an intensity change, even moreso.

As a singer we are constantly dealing with pressure changes.  Some songs can really put you to the test.

 

Amen, brother Bob.

 

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Sorry Khas...My comment was regarding the support.  It depends on what you are singing or doing with your voice.  For example, just a simple vowel change can affect your breath management and couple that with, let's say an intensity change, even moreso.

As a singer we are constantly dealing with pressure changes.  Some songs can really put you to the test.

Yeah, I totally get that the pressure changes if the phrase changes... But maybe mine's a moot point. If that. I guess I think that if you onset with vocal fry into a solid note and dp a siren while keeping everything proportionally the same in terms of tonenquality and volume (i guess this might be the act of actually changing a lot of things to do the trick of keeping everything same) then you'd end up going from a vocal fry to chest to head to fry again. Or this is what happens with me. I miss the whistle notes since I haven't practiced it at all.

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To me, saying the subglottal pressure changes is like saying "the pitch will change." If the air pressure from the lungs stays the same but the gap between the folds narrows then the pressure, along with the pitch, will change. Oh, and the air in front of your mouth will also change to warmer. What else that in no way answers what I'm trying to get at can we think of? Or maybe I just need to study more, I clearly have no idea how to carry the knowledge of the subglottal pressure change into my practice.

I'm saying if you keep the sound/tone quality the same, nothing conscious has to change. At least not dramatically. I thought that was the whole point of lip bubbles. To give you a cue, an easy sound to follow and focus on keeping a steady airflow even though the folds adduct.

Khassara...

Sub-Glottal respiration pressure = W&R and M&R onsets... those are the onsets that are more then anything else, oriented towards respiration balance... and should always include... working on passive fold closure with Bernoulli physics... 

Now then,... probably the most important "balance" trick in singing occurs at:

The point of sub-glottal respiration contact x the measurement of compression on the glottis = balance.

I am over simplifying here, but what Im saying is.. the compression level of the vocal fold adduction is proportionate or balanced with the sub-glottal pressure. Two points of contact, two points of energy, counter-balancing against each other... Keep those two points of contact balanced throughout your range and things will get a lot easier. 

Also... the sirens are GREAT!!  But be sure to also train the vocalize with intervals. You do have to train your body to feel the intervals as well.

I hope this helps... not sure if it is answering your question... I had to do a quick read here... Im about to start training... 

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I  had a chance to read this a little closer... I have to add...

First of all, it depends on what you are doing when you warm-up. Is it lip trills?  Is it resonant tracking on nasal consonants? Is it onsets followed by sirens or other vocalize. All of these workouts are different and do different things to the voice, so the answer would depend on what your doing.

Reading your original post, it seems you are doing an Indian solfeggi... coming out of the gates doing a solfeggi workout really isn't a BEST PRACTICE warm up. It may help, probably does... its not a waste of time... but, with a voice that has yet to calibrate sub-glottal pressure with vocal fold compression... and get the blood flowing into the intrinsic musculature and stretch out the adductors (TA, Arytenoids, Vocalis, etc...)... it simply is NOT a warm up. Pounding solfeggi in as the 1st thing you do is not a proper warm up. 

A proper warm up would most certainly include semi-occluded phonations (lip trills or resonant tracking... preferably resonant tracking because you get the added benefit of laryngeal tilt added to your warm up). If you are not spending at least a few minutes doing semi-occluded phonations, I think its a weak warm up.

Then... a great warm up ROUTINE... would also include...

Practicing some coordination & tuning onsets to work on your resonation, formant tuning, embouchure positioning, larynx dampening, and training your ears to hear the color of your formant (vowels) at a very precise level... like hearing frequency when you tune guitar strings... a singer needs to develop a similar level of precision in hearing formant/vowel colors... if you don't do this, you will chase your tail and have all kinds of vowel problems in your singing. You can't half-ass formant tuning.

You should also work on some resistance training onsets... these are onsets that are really made to strengthen the belt musculature. Strengthening and stretching out the adductors ((TA, Arytenoids, Vocalis, etc...), to get your M1/Chest Pulling game on... if you don't do this, you will have weak adductors and again... end up chasing your tail down the road wondering why you can't make your head voice sound "boomy" and modal.

Then... after that... if you are a real go-getter and hard core... you would include...

Putting your coordinated and beef'd up onsets not the move with vocalize; sirens are great, but you could do any workout if you want to..

THAT IS THE WARM UP FOR CHAMPIONS..

Now then... to answer the question about whether or not you should warm up into the m2/head voice positions or not?

HELL YES!! To suggest that only warming up in the chest voice will some how greatly benefit the head voice with only sympathetic influences from working ONLY the chest voice is ridiculous. For starters, it is not a proper way to work the head voice... and most importantly... why would you contentiously avoid warming up the head voice? What possible explanation could you give that would convince anyone that not "buzzing" or warming up above your passaggio was some how more productive and beneficial then actually doing it?  The logic is just simply ridiculous. You want to learn to sing great right? You want your head voice to be responsive and get strong right? So work it.... don't go to the gym to work out your biceps and only do bench press and convince yourself that if you only do bench press the secondary, sympathetic benefits to your biceps is enough for "bicep day".

Run your semi-occluded phonations through your passaggio and into your head voice not only when you train, but all day long... in the shower, in the car.

If your current new coach doesn't have you doing any semi-occluded phonations and isn't advocating that you phonate in the head voice... then... I know what to tell you, but I'll just be polite and leave it at that... 

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I  had a chance to read this a little closer... I have to add...

First of all, it depends on what you are doing when you warm-up. Is it lip trills?  Is it resonant tracking on nasal consonants? Is it onsets followed by sirens or other vocalize. All of these workouts are different and do different things to the voice, so the answer would depend on what your doing.

Reading your original post, it seems you are doing an Indian solfeggi... coming out of the gates doing a solfeggi workout really isn't a BEST PRACTICE warm up. It may help, probably does... its not a waste of time... but, with a voice that has yet to calibrate sub-glottal pressure with vocal fold compression... and get the blood flowing into the intrinsic musculature and stretch out the adductors (TA, Arytenoids, Vocalis, etc...)... it simply is NOT a warm up. Pounding solfeggi in as the 1st thing you do is not a proper warm up. 

A proper warm up would most certainly include semi-occluded phonations (lip trills or resonant tracking... preferably resonant tracking because you get the added benefit of laryngeal tilt added to your warm up). If you are not spending at least a few minutes doing semi-occluded phonations, I think its a weak warm up.

Then... a great warm up ROUTINE... would also include...

Practicing some coordination & tuning onsets to work on your resonation, formant tuning, embouchure positioning, larynx dampening, and training your ears to hear the color of your formant (vowels) at a very precise level... like hearing frequency when you tune guitar strings... a singer needs to develop a similar level of precision in hearing formant/vowel colors... if you don't do this, you will chase your tail and have all kinds of vowel problems in your singing. You can't half-ass formant tuning.

You should also work on some resistance training onsets... these are onsets that are really made to strengthen the belt musculature. Strengthening and stretching out the adductors ((TA, Arytenoids, Vocalis, etc...), to get your M1/Chest Pulling game on... if you don't do this, you will have weak adductors and again... end up chasing your tail down the road wondering why you can't make your head voice sound "boomy" and modal.

Then... after that... if you are a real go-getter and hard core... you would include...

Putting your coordinated and beef'd up onsets not the move with vocalize; sirens are great, but you could do any workout if you want to..

THAT IS THE WARM UP FOR CHAMPIONS..

Now then... to answer the question about whether or not you should warm up into the m2/head voice positions or not?

HELL YES!! To suggest that only warming up in the chest voice will some how greatly benefit the head voice with only sympathetic influences from working ONLY the chest voice is ridiculous. For starters, it is not a proper way to work the head voice... and most importantly... why would you contentiously avoid warming up the head voice? What possible explanation could you give that would convince anyone that not "buzzing" or warming up above your passaggio was some how more productive and beneficial then actually doing it?  The logic is just simply ridiculous. You want to learn to sing great right? You want your head voice to be responsive and get strong right? So work it.... don't go to the gym to work out your biceps and only do bench press and convince yourself that if you only do bench press the secondary, sympathetic benefits to your biceps is enough for "bicep day".

Run your semi-occluded phonations through your passaggio and into your head voice not only when you train, but all day long... in the shower, in the car.

If your current new coach doesn't have you doing any semi-occluded phonations and isn't advocating that you phonate in the head voice... then... I know what to tell you, but I'll just be polite and leave it at that... 

hi rob thank you for your detailed note.  I am a student of pillars and have benefited tremendously from it.  To the point of understanding most of the things you are talking about here. I mean it as a compliment

my point was not to say chest voice warm up will magically give a strong head voice.  I know it won't. My point was merely to say that chest voice is neglected since most of us want range and focus to work on bridging and head voice.  I have personally seen great benefit from focusing on my chest voice in my warm up which I did not do earlier. I feel like I can shed vocal weight and bridge far easier than I could earlier.  

Also the warm up is for different kind of singing where vowel modification and singing e4-C5 in a head voice is simply not part of requirement, which does not automatically mean the singing is any easier or inferior of any sort.  Indian classical is a different beast and people spend more than a decade before they can sing with authority.  The training I am undergoing is for mastery of Indian classical only and therefore very limited or remarkably precise training depending on what the singer hopes to train for.  My intention was not to say this warm up technique would suit for all kinds of singing

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Ok, I see... My apologies, I didn't catch the complete context of what you were writing about. I am really rushed for time, so I just kind of peruse sometimes too quickly.

I am very pleased to hear that your training with "4Pillars" is helping you. I look forward to helping you more with the program if you need anything. And... in the coming weeks, we (... all us TVS people... ), will be picking up and moving to a new home... supported by the new beautiful book, we will access all of our content, lessons, workouts, visuals, tables and quizzes on a super cool online course work interface... I'm bolding it now... 

Anyways, thanks for clarifying.

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