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My head voice - is this falsetto?

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Serotonin
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Hello everyone, I've been working through 4 Pillars in the past couple of day.

One problem that I've always been faced with is breaking into a falsetto whenever I'm in my head voice, so I've been using 4 Pillars to try and work on that. 

I feel I've got a bit better lately, but I'm not sure. So here's my head voice, am I still falsetto-ing or is this a clearer, less breathy tone than falsetto? 

 

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It is headvoice. I mean, there is adduction. It is not as strong as you would hear in other people, but there is muscle involvement. If you completely relax, then you would have a windy sound (falsetto), in which it is kind of hard to control pitch in, and doesn't have much range upwards as headvoice ( at least in most people I think )

 

Keep working on it. Give it one or two months and you'll gain a lot of strength in your headvoice, you'll surprise yourself :P 

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P A T I E N C E   !!!!!!

Work out the ENTIRE voice. You CANNOT spot train the voice. Do breathing exercises. Let loose and allow yourself to make stupid, ugly-sounding sounds.  Sing songs.

The voice (I've said this before) is like a genie.  It will see to it that you get your wish..and that includes bad wishes.

 

 

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Give him a break guys. I know what he is going thru. Eager to achueve his goals sharing even the tiniest of proggress. 

It takes time , yes, but we all want it now. And thats why threads like this appear. I did the same thing. He does it. Alot of others will too

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I'm not asking because I'm not patient, I'm asking because I don't want to get anything wrong and damage my voice. How long (roughly) does it take until ACTUAL progress is made?

It takes longer than you think, but it feels even shorter than that if you're practicing every day.

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After 3 months you can hear great differece if you practice carefully and often :)

And you are impatient. We all are. If you are not then you dont have your heart in it. And i know you do. And you are impatient. But that means you will worm ekstra hard to achieve it as fast as you can. And thats admirable.

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After 3 months you can hear great differece if you practice carefully and often :)

And you are impatient. We all are. If you are not then you dont have your heart in it. And i know you do. And you are impatient. But that means you will worm ekstra hard to achieve it as fast as you can. And thats admirable.

That's faster than I was thinking to be honest :D

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Elvis,

As a veteran TMV'er, I hear the same old story...Why can't i do this? How long will it take to do this? What's the best to get this?

Why not focus on the basics first, like how the voice actually makes sounds, breathing correctly for singing?  How to initiate a tone (onsets)......grab a book...do some research...

Everyone wants a chesty C5 right out of the gate, or this powerhouse voice, but doesn't want to do the basic work to get there.

In the gym, you want to build a nice body.....But do you go right up and stack the barbell, or do you start out light and work your way up?

People are after C5's but do they have D4 to A4?

I know this singer in my neighborhood......He can belt the shit out of these super high notes, always sailing in the stratoshere, crazy highs of reinforced falsetto, but when he comes back downstairs to his "tug of war zone" his whole voice just falls apart.

He has no mid-range!  All he does is sing in the upper deck.

I'm always willing to offer advice and try to help another singer, but they have to understand the basics first. Even if they think they understand the basics first, they have to undertsand the basics first.

I still make a point to recall the basics...breathing, posture, warming up, tension release, hydration, diet, sleep..etc..   

All I want to do is help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sounds like falsetto to me.  To me the most important thing in Head voice is the ability to keep the adduction the same in head and chest so that the transition is seamless.  I don't know how you accomplish that unless you try a siren that tries to connect the two.  Either Top Down or Bottom Up.  Your demonstration seems to be just falsetto.  You won't get there unless you try to connect the two.

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Well, progress is very personal really. A lot of people has strength but not coordination, and some, the other way round.  I had a lot of progress in a few months, and then my strength slowly built, along with my ability to actually sing.

This is from December  2013, when I first found my headvoice and got the hang of it :
 

https://app.box.com/s/fmf9j1rp2lry603yekda        Skip to minute 00:58

 

This is from January 16th 2014, I already learnt how to play with my larynx and how to adduct more, though anatomically haha my voice was still not very strong

https://app.box.com/s/m0t9xdq4o5hepjbw2nmp 

 

Late January 2014:

https://soundcloud.com/sebabergmann/parallel-minds-1

 

This is how I sounded on late 2014:

September
https://soundcloud.com/sebabergmann/septiembre-24-house-of-cards
 

October

https://soundcloud.com/sebabergmann/sets/tonteando-v

 

November:

 

 

Then I burnt a bit of my larynx due to GERD, in January, so I've been singing what I can, with a lot of problems.  This is how I sound now with a small gap on my folds:


https://soundcloud.com/sebabergmann/sets/recovery-slow-but-steady

 

 

 

 

 

I hope that helps you have an idea of progress/time ...  It's a very long process, and strength is not the only thing to build.
I could do stuff with my weak folds that I could never have dreamt of doing, so yeah... coordination is, at least to me, the most important thing.

According to my experience, I really think we always have to strive for balance. Never wear out your voice, take care of it. Warm up and down... Don't ever do loud stuff when cold. EVER!  
Remember also we all have bad days and good days, and pleeease try not to get carried away on good days, I have psyched myself quite a few times for overdoing stuff and feeling something weird in my throat in those occasions.

 

Try to keep record of your progress, man !! :D    It is always helpful!

 

 

 

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People are after C5's but do they have D4 to A4?

 

The most important statement, yet. I think a singer should be more concerned with the passagio areas rather than the extremes of their ranges, which will come along soon enough. For me, it helped ironing out the middle. Someone once said I had a solid A4 and that was a bigger compliment to me than whether I got a super-high note because it means I am mastering my range and it is especially important in the rock and pop stuff I am singing where it seems like every chorus has to have an A4 or something like it.

 

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What Gno is saying is correct, you need to learn the coordination for keeping chest active while in headvoice. "Mum mum mum" from the SS and MM ( MM mainly ) helped me find that.Also Bubs and Pup. Those consontants helped me find that feeling of "holding".  The dopey stuff helped me more than the high larynx, whiny sounds.

  Now that I think of it it may be that I unconsciously feel safer there... I can just "push" a bit more on my high range with a lower larynx.

 

Well, sorry for the rambling. Just some thoughts that might help you.

 

EDIT: I just read ronws' post.  I agree with him.  Taming the passaggio and those areas you want to sing in the most is also reeeally important, like he said, I also think it's more important than a C5 or crazy high

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The tug of war zone...generally D4 to A4....

It's a point where both musculatures (T/A and C/T) are (figuratively speaking) competing. One set wants to compress and seal, the other needs to stretch and thin. Just take a moment to deeply visualize that activity and you can easliy see why there's somethng to overcome.

It's very good to get mentally and physically aquainted with this area, to sense how you feel in this area. Play around in that part of the voice...cry around in that area.  Feel the pressure fluctuations as you move through the vowels.

Many times depending on the throat shape (vowel) or the set of lyrics your dealt, it can be very uncomfortable in that zone.

It can easliy be construed as strain or constriction by a beginner and it may not actually be. 

Study other singers as they navigate that area.  This is the area you want to nail down (i.m.h.o.) before to head off to the stratospheric notes. 

 

 

 

 

 

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