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Why did your teacher not define the word when he or she gave you the assignment? I am totally confused by the action.

What if I had a teacher that told me to change a light bulb without explaining how?

:huh:

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How do you go about "solfeging a song". My music teacher suggested I solfege Home by Phillip Phillips in the key of C. I know it starts off on a high C..making it do? I need help because I am fairly new to this. Please help.

This is a fairly complicated task if you are not already accustomed to reading music/understanding how solfege translates to the intervals of a song in relation to it's key signature.  What you will need to do is find sheet music for the vocal melody of "Home" and assign your solfege to each pitch/interval given in the song.  For example, any "C" located in the melody will be sung as "Do", any "D" in the melody will be sung as "Re", any "E" in the melody will be sung as "Mi."  This will repeat like this for the entire song so:

Solfege in C major

C = Do 

D = Re

E = Mi

F = Fa

G = So

A = La

B = Ti

C = Do (same as the first C)

So, going by the melody written here: http://www.musicnotes.com/sheetmusic/mtd.asp?ppn=MN0104414

The notes in the melody of the first verse are: C, C, C, C, A, G, G  (Hoooold oooonn, to me as we go.)  However, since we are replacing it with solfege you would instead replace these words with their relative solfege based on the lyric each pitch occurs on.  So E.G. you'd sing it like this: "Do dooooooooooo, do do la so so" 

I hope this helps you a bit and is not completely useless, good luck. :)

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How do you go about "solfeging a song". My music teacher suggested I solfege Home by Phillip Phillips in the key of C. I know it starts off on a high C..making it do? I need help because I am fairly new to this. Please help.

I have to admit and in agreement with some of the others... This makes no sense to me... or seems very strange?  You were asked to sing Solfeggi to a song your singing? I have never heard such and thing, it is a rather... pointless request. For starters, if this song is in a minor key, you would have to use a minor key solfeggi. Does a minor keyed Solfeggi even exist? In 30 years of voice training and a formal music education, I have never seen it. It may exist, but.. .you would have to know it and Im sure your teacher is not considering that point.

If the song is in a major key, you could conceivable work your solfeggi into most of the song, but to do so would be a completely pointless exercise! What is it that your teacher thinks you are going to get out of singing your song in Solfeggi instead of the real lyrics and vowels that actually exist in the song?! 

Trying to sing your song in Solfeggi is utterly pointless, apart from the fact that to do this, it would take hours upon hours of pointless practice... its like asking your student to recite the alphabet backwards to the melody of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again"... Why?... its totally stupid, achieves nothing and would take about a year of practice to do it?!

Please ask your teacher "why"... I am dying to hear the explanation as to why this is a good idea?

 

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The only application that this exercise would make sense in is if his teacher is trying to instruct him on sight-singing.  Perhaps he is going the classical route and has a teacher that wants him to learn to read music very well?  The benefits of working this song in solfege are purely theory based (specifically, using solfege to learn the diatonic intervals in C major) and not, as I would imagine, an ideal way to practice the song if the end goal is vocal technique training.  

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    My guess would be that the OP is not getting the intervals correct in the melody.......Some teachers teach  sight singing a melody by Solfege......

Jeremy......You beat me to it......I was typing while you made your post...........

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Sight singing? Ok... I suppose. I guess that is what it is used for sometimes... but still, it seem like a "long way home" and unnecessary technique to teach sight singing... Why not just ... teach the damn song, with the lyrics so the student can learn the vowels and articulation of the lyrics and... God knows, 29 other things he needs to learn the song that are lost if you start farting around with Solfeggi-izing your songs?

:moomin:

 

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    My guess would be that the OP is not getting the intervals correct in the melody.......Some teachers teach  sight singing a melody by Solfege......

Jeremy......You beat me to it......I was typing while you made your post...........

California internet speed, thank you.  :D

Sight singing? Ok... I suppose. I guess that is what it is used for sometimes... but still, it seem like a "long way home" and unnecessary technique to teach sight singing... Why not just ... teach the damn song, with the lyrics so the student can learn the vowels and articulation of the lyrics and... God knows, 29 other things he needs to learn the song that are lost if you start farting around with Solfeggi-izing your songs?

:moomin:

 

Yeah, this is only for people who want to learn to read music basically.  Learning to sight-sing has some advantages of course but, just as with learning to read guitar music, piano music, etc, this is not a necessity for training and is largely up to the student/teacher's interests.  However, assuming that the student in question is being trained to sight-sing music, I'd suggest to practice the hell out of solfege/reading music, because it gets easier the more you do it.  

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For people wondering, LA is the tonic of the relative minor scale in solfege. If you go Do ti La..... and land down there, you can end any song on a minor note chord. Major and minor are the same scale, starting on a different note, it's a 'mode' of the major scale. Harmonic and melodic scales have different intervals however so the standard one you hear wouldn't have those intervals. 

I don't sight sing music but I've found solfege useful in developing my ears, particularly for improvisation and harmony. Being able to move to any relative point on a scale and fully visualize the spacial relationship is challenging, but having words that correlate to helps bridges the gap, forcing you to name the relationship of the pitches rather than 'just sing a pitch by rote' and the technical terms like 'minor second' have too many syllables to really sing in real time.

I don't use solfege as much these days rather do a lot more more chromatic interval training. While there is a a chromatic version, it gets quite complicated to remember twelve words rather than and try to call out their relationships:

http://kris.shaffermusic.com/musicianship/chromaticSolfege.html

In general any kind of ear training is good for musicians. If you're just a singer and want to sing by rote memory note patterns, that's one thing, but if you want to be able to sing a harmony and know what that harmony is something like solfege or any form of relative pitch training is very helpful, I'm a point in training where I can generally harmonize, but can't always call the interval without slowing things down a lot and listening. The more you do it, the more intuitive both the harmonizing and intervals are, and your understanding of them. If I hadn't lost my voice for about 6 years, I would be a lot further ahead. As soon as I got it back and started training, my instrumental visualization of pitch steadily improved as well.

But basically people can have pitch memory, and pitch noodling (fumbling between notes randomly). I know as I've gone through both. But if you have pitch 'awareness' you can choose to sing a do on top of a la and get a minor chord, and if you hear that, you'll know what it is. Solfege is another tool and it is easier for someone to grasp. If you tell someone to sing the la note, in a familiar scale, it will be easier to then to tell them a major 6th or minor 3rd or the actual note name as there is a familiar pattern they can count up and down in.

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 For starters, if this song is in a minor key, you would have to use a minor key solfeggi. Does a minor keyed Solfeggi even exist? In 30 years of voice training and a formal music education, I have never seen it. It may exist, but.. .you would have to know it and Im sure your teacher is not considering that point.

 

 

Not sure if I'm right but, since a relative minor key starts and ends at the 6th degree of the major scale, I would assume it would be

 

La Ti Do Ra Me Fa So La

 

 

EDIT: Doh, just read Killerku's post. Note to self: read threads before posting!! :blush:

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There you go folks... the benefits of Solfeggi training... Thanks KillerKu. Can't argue with that.

So I guess its to help the student with ear training, ok. Still seems like over kill to me for learning a song. 

Good call Anthony... 

I too think it's overkill especially since soundtravels was is confused and it doesn't sound like it was properly explained or anything. 

It's better to have a student singing out of tune and excited about singing than baffled over a heady concept that wasn't explained and running to the internet to try to figure it out. He's lucky this forum is here.

There's plenty of time for ear training and all that, but singing should be a passionate at any level. The more barriers you put up to that, 'you can sing with passion. but first you must.... do it Diggitywoo style.' Do it what now? That's what solfege sounds like to someone who hasn't thought about it. It does sound confusing and pointless.

Time and place to get people thinking and progressing with ear training or whatnot, and it's probably not the first time someone is trying to learn a song.

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I think my teacher assigned this task so I have a better understand of the notes. Maybe it will help me hit the notes and stay on key?

It can, but these are long term goals. This exercise perfect things overnight. And it's certainly not the only exercise to help with this. I do think if you can have a good understanding of what it is now, you should probably try it.

But make sure you sing the song proper a well, from the heart, emotionally. Not just from the head like you're translating a foreign language. I don't know how long you've been singing, but it's not like a foreign language completely, if you know the words and you can feel it. Nothing wrong just going for it. You'll get better over time and a lot of exercises and thought experiments can help. 

It's possible to turn singing or music in general into a primarily intellectual process. But feeling it, going for it, I think that should be a big part of early training too. I personally find it really hard to think about or try to visualize a very deep or complex subject, and feel a strong emotion at the same time. You've got a lot of time for both, but when I'm singing things that I'm happy with, I'm in the moment. It's whatever I can without thinking too much. If I'm strumming a guitar, I'm not thinking about all of the intervals in the chord and how far away my voice is. You get a feel for it over time.

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Honestly, I would ask your teacher what it is he is trying to teach you with this. That is, how does he expect you to turn the song into a solfege exercise? Could he provide an example, even with something simple like "Silent Night, Holy Night"?

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