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Myxomati
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So, this will be my first post on here. I can't say I'm a lurker but since it's the main forum i stumble upon when looking for answers I instantly knew where to pose this question!

I've been singing seriously for about half a year, or at least tried to. When I started of I had a really weak and breathy voice, sounding like mud. This has, however cleared up a bit. But, still today one of my goals and what I simultaneously strive for is a strong and dominant voice, losing that weak voice I used to have. Oh, I hope no one takes any offence from the title!

To really simplify this question I have a video which I can refer to:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9R0WdUhVB84

If you watch the first two minutes you notice Damon having a really edgy, rackling voice. It has a lot of resonance but it's not all muddy. It's really distinct and kind of vocal fry-y. That way it sounds really strong and powerful. WHile I have a sliiighly similar voice I am way more in the direction of the interviewer. Listen to the differences.

When I warm up my voice or sometimes when I smoke with a dry throat I can get this effect enhanced, over my period of practice I've also tried to force it into my daily speach which atually has been successful but It's not always there and I usually have to lower my pitch slightly. 

My questio is obviously, if this is obtainable? Can I get that raspiness in my voice and what can I do to improve the resonance of my sole chest voice? 

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I actually do believe it is trainable, but I'm not sure I would recommend it for long term vocal health as it would never have the projection of a full modal voice and might end up being a fatiguing habit. Personally, I think it can sound a bit unnatural or 'put on' by some speakers. I know there are lots of Geoff Tate fans, but this video here, I've never been sure if it is a parody or not (it seems comical to me), but it sounds put on or 'played up' here:

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Anyway, I can kind of do this voice here so here is me doing a Cover of Geoff Tate's promo video:

https://app.box.com/s/c1i7hwjw04zeioctou6cs8rysyu1tj2o

But a lot of it is compression, and close mic proximity effect to get it to capture the way it does in radio interviews and so forth. I backed away from the mic at the end and turned off all FX. Just listen to the difference in volume between my normal speaking voice's volume and clarity and so forth. I would strain a lot if I tried to get the other voice that loud. If you are a lower voice type, you might be able to get relatively more projection out of it, but it's far from the most efficient use of the voice.

I probably wouldn't try to manufacture a speaking voice out of the idea of what sounds cool, as it sounds a bit like 'fake' to me personally to not use a speaking voice that works, is healthy, and is more natural to you. But it's up to you. I'd imagine most wouldn't be able to maintain the clarity outside those scenarios of close micing and some degree of FX vs a more modal speaking voice.  

Basically the main thing you'd need to know, is if you retrain speaking habits, you'd have the risk of training them in an unhealthy way. Speaking is so vital to people's lives. It's a utility and not just an art. So if you were to end up with problems with your speaking voice vs singing voice it would effect every aspect of your life. So I would advise some caution there and perhaps professional help. There are speech therapists who can work with transgender people to increase femininity and frequency of the voice. There might be some who could have knowledge in speaking lower pitches healthily. 

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That is how Tate speaks and yes, he is confident. And yes, he does ride motorcycles, mostly Harley-Davidson. A few years ago, when he was still with QR, they were scheduled to play at the Buffalo Chip near Sturgis, South Dakota for the Sturgis Rally. He and his wife rode his H-D Road King (that's the full bagger you see in the video) all the way from his house near Seattle, Wa to the Buffalo Chip.

In fact, he and his wife like to visit B&B's for breakfast and lunch, tooling around on the hawg. If you are ever in the Pacific Northwest at one of those little mom-and-pop diners and the guy at the table next to you looks a lot like Tate, it probably is.

And there is nothing wrong with him having a "brag sheet." For as much as I have said that the sound of QR changed when Chris DeGarmo left, it would not have been what it is without that voice.

And yes, he really does have a vineyard and the wine is called Insania and it is pretty good, though hard to find in the south. Though, I think a person can order some through their local retailer or go to his website and ask about retailers in your area.

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Lots of people ride motorcyles, some make wine, some are in bands. A lot of people are passionate about living, even more are gandfathers, etc. They don't make videos like that. I did find it peculiar, perhaps coming across as egotistical, but not wrong or offensive.

I think it might be a parody because of the section where he says, 'this is my favorite part' and tentatively hops this tiny distance.

As for the speaking voice, I wouldn't recommend imitating it if it doesn't come naturally and if vocal professionals don't have knowledge in training it to be used healthily over a long course of time. My experience is it is just too inefficient in the long run to try to fry into that area while also projecting enough of a voice to be heard, whether it sounds 'manly' or not, but a speech therapist or touring professional speaker might have more insight. 

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My friend it looks like you are experiencing an extreme case of what we gentle folk around here call "having a light tenor voice."  First off, you will want to post a clip of your speaking voice now that way we can actually hear what you are doing.  And second, honestly, in my personal largely uneducated opinion there is no much you can do to make your voice sound substantially bigger/lower/deeper than it is.  I find that it's much easier to make your voice sound higher than it is than it is to sound lower... I.E. you either got the equipment or you don't.  There are certainly things you can do to gain a stronger voice and with technique training and practice you'll surely gain a few more potential low notes but you are never going to talk like Barry White if you got a voice like Michael Jackson.  

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My friend it looks like you are experiencing an extreme case of what we gentle folk around here call "having a light tenor voice."  First off, you will want to post a clip of your speaking voice now that way we can actually hear what you are doing.  And second, honestly, in my personal largely uneducated opinion there is no much you can do to make your voice sound substantially bigger/lower/deeper than it is.  I find that it's much easier to make your voice sound higher than it is than it is to sound lower... I.E. you either got the equipment or you don't.  There are certainly things you can do to gain a stronger voice and with technique training and practice you'll surely gain a few more potential low notes but you are never going to talk like Barry White if you got a voice like Michael Jackson.  

   Actually Michael was capable of sounding very low. He was a natural Baritone. People were used to hearing him sing as a youngster........They kept that illusion going. Give the people what they want. As you said it is easier to make the voice Lighter than Heavier.

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   Actually Michael was capable of sounding very low. He was a natural Baritone. People were used to hearing him sing as a youngster........They kept that illusion going. Give the people what they want. As you said it is easier to make the voice Lighter than Heavier.

I think he might have been a light baritone too, based on some of the clips I heard of his voice doing vocal exercises and in a few speaking sections of a few songs. I can significantly lighten my voice (sound like George Michael in Wham which is a bit similar to Michael Jackson in some ways), but it will only get so heavy and deep without the folds and resonating cavities. And basically while I can fry things from time to time, it's not going to be that useful in a real world scenario due to volume and possibly sustainability of the voice.

As you age things can change. I have like 3 more notes than I used to in an average scenario in my modal voice than when I was 20. But I gained 20 some notes on top and the ability to sound really light. Unless someone has evidence to the contrary, I'm inclined to believe that's just the way it is.

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Michael Jackson and baritone anything do not belong in the same sentence in my opinion.  I've heard the clip where he goes through his whole range, even at his most comfortable, resonant low notes there is nothing about his voice that strikes me as even a light baritone.  But hey, this is going into suuuuubbbbbbjjjjjeeeeeecccttttiiiivvvvee territory that can in no way reach a conclusion so please understand I wish for nothing but to submit my own opinion, not try and argue that your guy's opinions are wrong. :)

Plus, it's the OP we need to be discussing not Michael heheh.  It was silly of me to bring it up in that context so I apologize.  

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Michael Jackson and baritone anything do not belong in the same sentence in my opinion.  I've heard the clip where he goes through his whole range, even at his most comfortable, resonant low notes there is nothing about his voice that strikes me as even a light baritone.  But hey, this is going into suuuuubbbbbbjjjjjeeeeeecccttttiiiivvvvee territory that can in no way reach a conclusion so please understand I wish for nothing but to submit my own opinion, not try and argue that your guy's opinions are wrong. :)

Plus, it's the OP we need to be discussing not Michael heheh.  It was silly of me to bring it up in that context so I apologize.  

    It's all good. There are some cases where someone could be stuck in a certain  "timbre". Yes if you have that type of voice you need to train accordingly. Usually when you train for higher lighter songs the lower end will lose some of its richness. If you train for lower heavier songs your highs may lose some quality also. Michael talked that way on purpose so he did not lose his sound onr the higher notes.

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    It's all good. There are some cases where someone could be stuck in a certain  "timbre". Yes if you have that type of voice you need to train accordingly. Usually when you train for higher lighter songs the lower end will lose some of its richness. If you train for lower heavier songs your highs may lose some quality also. Michael talked that way on purpose so he did not lose his sound onr the higher notes.

Jackson's high notes are almost always head heavy and he starts early. He has like 5 extra notes vs Stevie Wonder. When I heard his non modified/lightened speaking voice it has that for a lack of a better word, 'black guy resonance,' this cool, often baritonal sounding timbre a lot of black guys seem to have when speaking.

When I use a fuller chest voice it sounds. It reminds me of a young maybe bobby soxers Sinatra before his voice got more world wearied in his classic era. Nothing I've ever done with my voice sounds like a black guy, ever, but I know how to modify my voice to get lighter. So for a warm up I went from Sinatra, 'manly chest singing' to attempting to emulate Jackson and a back and forth.  

https://app.box.com/s/fgckpwkehfdryktzc2fexaejqkfg8964

 

Michael Jackson and baritone anything do not belong in the same sentence in my opinion.  I've heard the clip where he goes through his whole range, even at his most comfortable, resonant low notes there is nothing about his voice that strikes me as even a light baritone.  But hey, this is going into suuuuubbbbbbjjjjjeeeeeecccttttiiiivvvvee territory that can in no way reach a conclusion so please understand I wish for nothing but to submit my own opinion, not try and argue that your guy's opinions are wrong. :)

Plus, it's the OP we need to be discussing not Michael heheh.  It was silly of me to bring it up in that context so I apologize.  

Michael had definitely had lightening in his voice as well as his skin. It sounds cooler when he did it, but how much was it lightened?

When you get further into Barry Gibb and beyond, you might be surprised the mysteries there occurring when you are approaching the voice from M2. What would have happened if a young Sinatra sang with a very lightened heady voice instead of a chest dominant kind of voice? You might go back to the Range Place with all sorts of weird outlooks there.

So maybe it's not entirely off topic. For all we know the OP might be speaking in M2.

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Yup, if you get right up on the mic it gets downright muffled a lot of times. I try not to get any closer than say 4 inches and consider that close micced. Could have gotten even closer with that Geoff Tate voice it would have been even more exaggerated.

When watching TV shows I often hear really out of place mic placement for the scene. Like a guy will be across the room from the camera, facing away and sometimes literally walking away from the camera or close reference character who might be listening and they will be all 'super close miced' for dramatic effect. It's fun to listen to.

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I must say I am impressed by the response you people have given, the last few forums I've been to (unrelated to singing) have all been quite dull, THESE answers are intriguing!

I would want to point out that the Tate voice has a quite essential difference to the one of Damon. From what I can comprehend, it resonates from the higher in the throat as opposed to Damon's which has a clear clipping in the chest area/vocal cords. I'd be bold enough to say Tate probably has a slight simulation of it, trying to force it into his entire speach. I've heard a lot of friends with these kinds of voices, however, most tend to slip in and out of it, few keep it consecutive.

To rephrase the question for the sake of getting a satisfying answer I'll ask this: The voice I usually wake up with, my hung over voice, the voice just after cigarettes or the voice from a nasty cold. That resonance, Can I aquire it? If it's there at the above situations it has to be something obtainable?

The mic and a lot of factors abviously play crucial roles but what I am after isn't the minute details but just that solid reliable voice, KILLERKU, even you kind of have that while speaking normally at the end of the attached clip! Whenever I get time I'll try to upload some samples, I'd like ot get my singing reviewed on here as well. Is it true, I have to be premium to do that? Get advice on my singing, from the members on the forum?

Lastly, I'd like to add, I am 18 and I have always been very bad with the words. I have a hard time speaking, pretty much any advanced topic leads to my vocabulary making me sound like a goon, struggleding with finding the words and with vocal gestures (english isn't my native language). I have for a long time had a bad monotone voice and never grew up to be the talkative type. This is what makes me believe the voice I have today is not only bad but not close to what it is supposed to be like. My voice has improved drastically in the last few weeks and I have become much more confident in speaking! I will try to find a really old clip of me talking, a newer one and then I'll record one with my normal voice to be compared with the take of my voice during a nasty hangover!

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Myxomati, a sound clip would be very helpful. I personally wouldn't go the route of imitating cigarettes, dryness, illness, and all that, because are things that can cause damage to the folds/voice. Sometimes we singers overdo things, but singing is a periodic activity, so if we do that, we rest and hopefully learn to not do it again. Speech is an every day necessity for most people.

I would guess most people could probably increase the resonance of their chest voice by shifting vowels to more open positions, slightly twanging a bit, and possibly at the beginning of a yawn. Vocal fry is as far as I know fine as a 'sometimes' thing, but speech therapists can consider it chronic and possibly overdone. A lot of things people migiht try to do like shoving the larynx down, could cause tension, and would likely muffle the voice. 

So depending on what you're already doing, there might be some healthy things you could do to take more advantage of the resonant space and fold closure from your modal voice, but if I were you, barring a bona fide speech therapist. I would error on the side of health with trying to imitate sounds that are often signs of ill health of the voice, in your regular speech.

So yeah, if you're interested in a more manly voice in general, and not specifically the hoarse sound. For most people they probably have a bit of wiggle room.

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Here check this out:

https://app.box.com/s/wscyp8z6vo752y1bqj6jr10sobb6i1du

Since you're not native English So I'll translate each speaking voice I used with an explanation:

Speaking Softly  (a relaxed murmer, not very loud, if you speak this way it would probably sound less manly)

Speaking Lightly (Speaking almost in a head voice, it will sound feminine like Michael Jackson)

Speaking Nasally (sent my resonance into my nose, this is audible but isn't as manly as some other voices)

Speaking Woofy (opening my pharynx, my larynx drops slightly, it is bigger but muffled and wouldn't be audible in a lot of situations)

Speaking Dopey (pushing my larynx down, it is very muffled and would strain my voice over time)

Speaking Quacky (loads of twang, resonance really high up, it's audible but harsh to the ears)

Speaking With a Lot of Manly Resonance That Might be Difficult to Maintain (I'm opening most of my resonators and supporting my voice, it's overkill)

Speaking Normally (Here it is backed off, where I don't have to use breath support to produce the timbre)

Going From Tiny Voice To Big One (here I'm starting with a tiny voice, and swelling it into a supported big timbre, again this is overkill for every day use)

The goal would be to find a voice that doesn't require too much effort to use,  something that is fairly natural and functions.

This is all stuff I learned from vocal training for many years. So a lot of this stuff will translate. I've heard various speakers go one of these directions or another. All of those voices are modal and many of them could be tweaked to be audible. The least comfortable one for me is the dopey one as there is an actual downward pressure, but i could take the light voice and probably twang it a bit if I wanted to speak feminine and light and audible.  

If you move away from looking for the hoarse sound, this is probably achievable and a vocal coach would likely help. There might be a technique for getting the hoarse sound healthily for a long duration of time, but if there is, I don't know it, personally. And since most of us are singers, I don't know if they could really use the distortion techniques that are temporarily used in singing in an actual speaking voice. If we screw up our distortion, we can just stop singing. If we messed up our distortion while training a habit in the speaking voice. I've lost my speaking voice due to illness, man. If I don't take medication which manages my nerve pain, I can lose it again. You never, ever want to lose that. Believe me. I've been there. It's a very important thing to keep and take care of.

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Well, my personal recommendation would be to just speak in the most relaxed way possible. If your voice does not sound "manly" with a relaxed voice you maybe just don't have that quality in your voice. 

That crackly, fry-ish component can be in a speaker's voice if he is a smoker, he has his "morning voice" or if his vocal folds have a big natural mass. You can force that quality if your voice does not have any of these three things but it will do you no good. Especially as a singer it is not a good idea to create habits for unneccessary tensions by using them in speech. That Gorillaz guy and Geoff Tate are both smokers iirc and in both of their voices I hear the typical quality of a "smoking voice". This is nothing that will help you in singing, it will not make your singing voice sound better. From what I know it is mainly caused by excess mucous on the vocal folds. I can't watch that Geoff Tate video but in addition to his "smoking quality" he also uses quite a bit of additional twang in his speaking voice which sometimes makes him sound "cartoonish" when he speaks.

Phil Anselmo sounds like a guy that wants to make his voice "deeper than it is", adding lots of tension to his vocal folds during speech. His vocal folds are very thick when he speaks, thicker than normal which makes his speaking pitch "unnaturally low". If I would speak like he does my speaking voice would center somewhere in the 1st octave.

One excercise to find a good and resonant speaking voice is to breathe out strongly then not breath in but hum on an MMM sound. This will usually put your voice on the most efficient pitch having good resonance from the M. Try to center your voice around that pitch. 

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I wouldn't recommend smoking to try to sound cool. Two singers I like were both taken out by lung/laryngeal cancer and were life long smokers: Mary Wells, and Eddie Kendricks. They had to lose a lot of their voice by the end of it and died young.

Here is Mary singing one of her hits:

Here she is having lost her voice and battling cancer:

 

Eddie had a really heavenly falsetto:

But he struggled a lot with laryngeal cancer. He ended up singing with only 1 lung before it took him out. He always gave it his best, but sometimes it really wore down on his voice:

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Just a quick youtube, this guy has been smoking for 5 years, but imo has all sorts of speech habits that could be optimized for a more typically manly sounding presence (murmering, heady, sometimes nasal placements, speaking very quickly, etc). Maybe in another 25 years or so it would pay off, but a trip to a speech therapist or singing/vocal training could probably get more gains in months than 5 years of smoking more healthily.

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I used to think my voice was going to get lower and more rough. By the time I got to my forties, I grew up, just a little and realized, it ain't gonna happen. So, I decided to work on appreciating the voice I do have. So, tell me I sing like a woman and I will reply, yes, like a really tall woman with a fu manchu moustache, about 235 lbs on a 6' 6" frame and trained in assorted martial arts and a master marksman with firearms (at least according to LB Huddleston Gun Range.) Yeah, that kind of woman.

:24:

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