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Speaking like a man

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Myxomati
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Ronws, you had a really nice resonance on Diamonds and Rust cover. I remember it sounding distinctively masculine. Very few women could achieve physiologically, even really low voiced ones like Nina Simone.

So as much as you might play it down, you can play with the guys with your light tenor voice. I listen to a lot of contralto type singers or 'big voiced' women. They sound like women to me. It's like a voice print thing. 

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Yeah, that man knows what he is talking about. Also notice that his voice is not particularly "deep" and still sounds "manly".

Yawning opens the pharynx and depresses the larynx. Yawning also signals relaxation in the body. There's a common speech therapy technique called the yawn sigh.  Anxious voices tend to naturally raise pitch and tend to have less resonance there is a hyperactivity in the nervous system and generally increased muscle tension, particularly in the throat. A lot of people speak with raised larynx and relatively closed pharynx and sometimes with a nasal placement. It's also possible to bring the yawn sensation to the point where it can be a bit dopey. Bill Paxton the actor can sound this way to me sometimes and Thomas Haden Church.   

I've been reading about 'attractor' states. Which basically means people don't all have the same habituated state that is normal for their voices to 'go to' instinctively. I was a mute for so many years and have to deal with so much pain, my attractor states were off and are still off if I don't stay on it. Wincing and tensing with pain is natural so I've had to try to reinstate some of them. My voice now is probably not much different prior to getting problems. But if i were to let my attractor states run freely I'd still be in a state of constantly flinching even when my medication has dialed the pain down on average that I can relax more.

So through conscious use, you can move the attractor states of what is a 'average' disposition around. But you can also move them into really inefficient places. That's what the speech pathologists call dysphonia. Anyway, yeah my voice could never relax for many years. Yawning in itself would trigger attacks I found all sorts of ways of simulating it. I'll never get a completely habitually relaxed voice as there is too much going on that is very much the opposite. But you can try to move the habituated state as far towards relaxation as you can.

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Yeah if you already sound kind of like Bill Paxton, you probably don't need to add more. When I turn on the Bill Paxton voice:

https://app.box.com/s/cp72oyca79j84nrhnsf6iec4hxhawnkb

It's useable and isn't uncomfortable but is probably not optimal for my voice type. He might have a larger pharynx at rest or it might be a voice habit. It's kind of like a southern twangy yawn sound and he grew up on Texas. So if you combine a Southern USA twang with a yawn it goes that direction. 

It depends on your physiology and what you're already doing. A lot of different speech habits are functional, but what works is somewhat individual, as part of your personality/cultural identity, physiology and habits.

On the opposite side, I do some programming, and it seems extremely common among computer programmers to close off the lower resonating spaces. Like I would look for a tutorial how to learn how do something, and there is a pretty high chance the narrator will sound will sound at least something like this:

https://app.box.com/s/lx9twwrl3hz5104sjkygysaie7dvoasj

I don't know if it's like 'programming or geek culture' or something, but doing more of the Bill Paxton voice might balance out some of that.  It's kind of grating sounding to me, and if you're going to be a public speaker. Regardless of politics, imo Obama was elected partly in my country because of his voice. If he had speech habits like that as a public speaker, he probably wouldn't have gotten elected. People can be manipulated by the sound of people's voices. The content can be exactly the same, but people are more likely to think 'this person doesn't sound like a leader, so I won't vote them regardless of content.'

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Yeah, the funny thing is Bill Paxton doesn't have a low voice but it is really resonant. I think he has had some voice training because he started in theater before getting into movies. There are plenty of theaters and programs and acting programs around Dallas, (Texas) where he is from. He is also a good example of an authentic north Texas accent. Other actors not from here lay it on way too thick.

For example, in the movie "Twister," actor Cary Elwes gets it all wrong. So does the actress playing his (Bill's) fiance. However, his soon-to-be ex-wife Helen Hunt, without trying to sound "southern," gets closer simply by being relaxed and slowing down her cadence, here and there, which is the real secret to a Texas accent. It is not just nasality and the incessant vowel dipthonging, it is the slower cadence that really makes it.

I have been in north Texas since 1974 but natives can tell I am not from Texas. Do I sound southern enough? You would have to ask Bob or Adolph, guys I have talked with in phone conversations.

Some of you might say, "well, Ron, you don't sound southern when you sing."

Well, I sing differently than how I speak.

Sorry to side-track. I just happen to like Bill Paxton as an actor and accents are fascinating, I think.

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Yawning does lower the larynx and can be very useful as a relaxation exercise. But depending on the person it is not a very good idea to focus on this. 

Yep, I think that's exactly what Morgan means. It relaxes the muscles. He doesn't use a "yawning position" when he speaks. This would sound pretty dopey.

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Yep, I think that's exactly what Morgan means. It relaxes the muscles. He doesn't use a "yawning position" when he speaks. This would sound pretty dopey.

It's possible to use the opposite of a yawning position though. A lot of people do. Paying attention to the muscles while yawning can help build enough awareness to consciously control the muscles involved so you can go 10 percent towards a yawn, 10 percent away from a yawn. I'm not convinced there is a true rest position for the larynx or pharynx. The muscles all have various an antagonistic relationship with other muscles.

There are numerous elevators and numerous depressors for the larynx and multiple constrictors and expanders of the pharynx. So a rest position is relative. Any true extreme (larynx on the floor or shooting out the top) will involve  excessive. But there is a range of motion where people develop psychologically relaxed habits so when they are at rest, the habits can still go one way or another.  If I relax everything as much as possible, it makes a sound that you sometimes hear in deaf voices:

https://app.box.com/s/runay6ziorarpgy934dcx5o27lowsj8o

They don't hear and shape the sound so it comes out overly relaxed. Very few speakers are completely relaxed. If there is 10 percent flex in one direction or another, it might actually be beneficial.

The yawn is an extreme depression of larynx and expansion of pharynx. These muscles are consciously being used all the time. The other voice I'm using is an a relatively extreme opposite coordination. Neither are fatiguing for me to do temporarily, but might be fatiguing in the long term. If you listen to different cultures throughout the world, some Asian cultures habituate closed phonations. I h ave a friend who's mother speaks in a very closed, punchy, whiny, almost almost middle voice 'ng' position. She's a professional teacher, and is very loud all day every day at home and with family with no problems. It's a fairly common phonation in that culture and in being in a teacher position she probably naturally gravitated to something that was fairly loud but also wasn't that fatiguing. 

https://app.box.com/s/jcrfqjurfhslguv6ln1e921vdz1hj1p0

It's far from the most manly voice but I could probably make use of it. If you listen to all of the various cultures of the world, a lot of them find very different ways of doing it. 

I feel like we should have a counterpart thread to get the most feminine voice. Now that would be entertaining. :D

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   Morgan is not speaking about SPEAKING with a yawn........ He is talking about how Yawning stretches the vocal cords and relaxes them. Yawning a lot stretches the cords more Like an athlete stretches his hamstrings and stuff.  It is not about larynx position.  The relaxed cords will have more "Depth" to the sound regardless of pitch. Like when you wake up in the morning.

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Morning voice as far as I understand it is due thickened 'inflamed' vocal folds. They have more fluid and mucus:

http://www.medicaldaily.com/raspy-voice-morning-heres-why-your-voice-changes-day-goes-318248

It's not about the voice being relaxed, so much as having enough mucus that the folds aren't vibrating as freely and get croaky sounding.

Yawning tends to thin vocal cord closure on average producing a slacker,  softer phonation although I can mimick the motion with vocal fry and 'stiffen' in the vocal folds it requires effort. Speech therapists use it to reduce hyper phonation and greater relaxation of the vocal tract.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8353622

This would generally send it in the opposite direction of the stiff voice:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stiff_voice

Slack voice is closer to the yawn voice:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slack_voice

I wouldn't recommend yawning for people trying to obtain more fold closure. It's useful for relaxing the tract, but the morning voice sound is definitely stiffer.

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It all depends on what tensions you typically have in your voice. Vocal fry for example relaxes the vocal folds, but makes strong use of the adductors. Yawning relaxes the adductors and the TA, but it tenses the vocal folds. However, most people overuse the TA and/or the adductors in speaking so yawning is perceived as "relaxing". If you speak dopey all the time you will probably find relaxation using vocal fry. It just depends on the type of your habitual tension or "attractor state" as KillerKu called it.

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I thought I'd chime in with some variety of timbres for the mix in the thread.

 

On Trauma, my voice is as low and deep as I can go, very low larynxy and a lot of mass involved ( requires a lof of support for me )

I don't think I could speak like this constantly as it feels quite fatiguing overtime for my voice, at least for now.

Isolation and Voices is a mix of very light, light, medium and "biggest" haha  I always find medium to be the most comfortable to sing and speak.

And in the last one, I have more ease of low notes, but it is not as resonant or deep as Trama ( trauma is recent, the other one is from a month ago, I've been training that haha). I recorded it eearly in the morning, with "morning" and kind of "party" voice, so it's totally cheating. At least for now, I can't do those lowest notes consistently.  I've found that training my chest voice for the last year has gained me like 3 or 4 more notes lower and with a lot of control and consistency though, so I'll keep at it and see where it leads.

EDIT: I forgot to mention that, just like Killer's recordings, Trauma here and Abandoned are heavily compressed so it sounds a lot bigger than it actually is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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