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Elrathion
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taking the thyroarythanoid up above your first and second bridge with alot of contraction, more then the usual thyroarythanoid, cricothyroid balance.

Elrathion: Because of the way that the pitch-control mechanism works, additional contraction of the TA must be matched with adduction and CT activity changes. This will stiffen the entire vocal process, reduce flexibility, create breaks, decrease range, etc.

A question back at you: What are you trying to do musically, that you think that adding TA will accomplish? Is there a particular tone quality that you are after?

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well right now just before and at my second bridge, allthough I still feel like I'm taking my chest higher, the result is often a more heady tone. But like in certain music pieces, particulary musical theatre, I want to have a more chesty sound up there.

I'm basicly a spinto tenor singing as a lyric cse I'm not developed enough, I wanna start taking that extra step.

Till the first bridge I take enough chest up, but after that it goes down :P

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well right now just before and at my second bridge, allthough I still feel like I'm taking my chest higher, the result is often a more heady tone. But like in certain music pieces, particulary musical theatre, I want to have a more chesty sound up there.

I'm basicly a spinto tenor singing as a lyric cse I'm not developed enough, I wanna start taking that extra step.

Till the first bridge I take enough chest up, but after that it goes down :P

Elrathion: If you have not already done so, would you read my blog on the basics of phonation at

http://www.themodernvocalist.com/profiles/blogs/phonation-fundamentals

It explains a relationship between adduction and registration that is relevant to what you are attempting to do... especially what changes occur at the laryngeal level that affect the consistency of the phonated tone in the different ranges.

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well hmm.

I would say I start feeling a change C4, but it doesn't really happen there my first bridge, it starts at around E, F for me. My second bridge starts around G#, A

Elrathion: Ok, thanks. Do you have a sense as to why your bridges are in those particular locations, and what you are bridging 'from' and 'to'?

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It are the places where I feel a resonance happening. As far as why exactly the second bridge is there I'm not really sure, maybe you can tell me, I just feel it's there. I got more bridges actually as I go higher :P They are just places like I have a hard time crossing and once I can cross them I'm like phew ^^

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It are the places where I feel a resonance happening. As far as why exactly the second bridge is there I'm not really sure, maybe you can tell me, I just feel it's there. I got more bridges actually as I go higher :P They are just places like I have a hard time crossing and once I can cross them I'm like phew ^^

Elrathion: Interesting! I have a completely reversed understanding of what a bridge is, then, at least by this description. I am not trained in the specifics of this terminology, but I had understood the bridge to be an area of transition, connecting two more-or-less secure areas. Or, expressed another way, the place _between_ the resonant series of notes.

I can relate, though, to the vocal issues involved with getting above a resonant note. Its easier to sing the resonant vowels, so they are easier to 'fatten up' with a little more vocal weight. On the note or two _above_, though, attempting that same weight can cause strain or a crack, because the acoustic assistance of the resonance is no longer as strong.

All that said, I think I know enough now to respond to your original question, which was how to 'Take Chest up'. The answer is based on an understanding of vocal registration and adduction, and how they coordinate with breath energy to make a full, powerful tone in every region of your voice.

For singers such as yourself, who experience a suddenly lighter tone quality at some point in the range, (i.e., just above a really easy, resonant note,) the issue is oversinging on the fat note, and under-adducting on the weak one. To remedy the situation, I recommend smooth slide exercises, sung slowly, softly but clearly, on /i/ or /u/ (ee or oo) over a 2-octave range. When you initially try this, you will likely hear breaks and other kinds of inconsistencies. That is fine. Those tell you where the tricky transitions are. :-) Go back, and repeat, and do the sliding more slowly at those places, almost in what feels like slow mo. As you approach from below the place that the break happened before, soften just a tiny bit to allow the small adjustment of adduction and registration to occur, and then you should be able to proceed upward.

On the way down, you will find the same issues, but in reverse.

THe kinds of adjustments I am discussing are best learned experientially... by doing. If, after 1/2 hour or so of attempts, you cannot get the slide up and down without a 'break', the issue may be too much breath energy. So, lay on your back on the floor (bed/couch works fine too) and repeat the exercise. This position removes all of gravity's effect on air pressure.

FYI, this is a very good way to begin the singing day, and (once you get the hang of it) you can do it in your car, too. :-) Repeating for 10 days or 2 weeks, and you probably will be able to do it sitting and/or standing up, and a bit louder. You be the judge of how rapidly you can integrate this style of vocalism into your regular singing.

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Steven, could you honor me with some audio examples of the exerices? I'm a very auditive, visual oriented person in studying, so that would help me connect with what you're saying.

Robert, do you think each voice is the same? Do you approach each voice the same? Personally my issue I think is not headvoice since I can go whistle tones (highest I ever made was G6) I can take headvoice down, but I don't see how it would fix my problem. I blend, I mix as I go up robert, but to me there are different degrees on how you can mix. Right now I take my chest up good till F, F#'s, then I decline a bit in chest, making me thin out and wind up in a more heady mix (it's still with chest, and you can hear it, but it's lighter). Often by the time I get to B's, people ask me is this a really loud headvoice, while I still feel like chest. What I'm trying to achieve is getting more options to my voice, where I either can asscend and blend into headvoice for a lighter chest quality on the high notes, or get a more chesty sounding tone up there.

For example: I could sing my A's like Westlife would sing them, but that kind of popmix in musical theatre will not correspond to the feeling I'm trying to get into those songs. Furthermore I'm a heavier voice, so I wanna bring that side out aswell. I guess I just need to be patient and let it come, but since I'm training every day, I'm looking for ways to maybe speed up the process a bit :P

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Steven, could you honor me with some audio examples of the exerices? I'm a very auditive, visual oriented person in studying, so that would help me connect with what you're saying.

Elrathion: Sure. I can pull some of those together for you.

Right now I take my chest up good till F, F#'s, then I decline a bit in chest, making me thin out and wind up in a more heady mix (it's still with chest, and you can hear it, but it's lighter). Often by the time I get to B's, people ask me is this a really loud headvoice, while I still feel like chest.

Elrathion: Your latter description sounds like what the Italian's called 'full voice in the head', Voce piena in testa. IMO, its a very usable, powerful form of vocalism. These days, its referred to as the 'Robust Head Voice'.

Here is a suggestion from the realm of classical singing:

As you traverse the range from middle C to the F above, allow the vowels to darken and narrow (at the mouth opening) just slightly, and back off the intensity just a bit. The overall effect should be slightly rounder vowels, but at the same volume. This will pull the F2 resonance down so that your transition point to the 'top' will be lower, and just a bit easier, while still retaining power. Once you have gotten to the top, you can open things back up. You do not have to try to get a different mix... the vowel will tweak it for you.

One final thought for now... when you are in this top range, your vocal power depends a bunch on the particular vowel you are singing. With very small changes, you can align harmonics to F2, and the ring will be unbelievable.

I will post the exercise examples probably tomorrow.

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vocal compression, if you start in chest with a grunt like sound (not a squeaky squeeze) you can go up and never break, however it's very subtle and you sort of need to be at a certain level of refinement in order to do it, however I showed someone how to do it the other day and they can't believe the results, it's considered sort of a secret but I will tell you that as long as you narrow your vowels and compress your chords you should be fine, start with a grunt without raising your larynx and then go up in vocal fry with an edgy tone. and when you go high think "edgy"

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frank,

What you are describing is basically the same setting as in Curbing which is a "vocal mode" in CVT(Complete Vocal Technique). What Elrathion is looking for is more "chest presence" which will equal "full-mettalic" in CVT. And I believe he his looking for the Overdrive mode which actually use wide vowels and no "hold" which will equal the "grunt" you described. :)

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Steven, could you honor me with some audio examples of the exercises? I'm a very auditive, visual oriented person in studying, so that would help me connect with what you're saying.

For the 2-octave oo slide, here is an example. Sorry that the high end is a little boomy. Happened to be the case resonant frequency of my laptop ;-) However, you will get the idea immediately.

http://api.ning.com/files/aOLRkWiJLFLjTcHPoXXTp3skBLHZwhhYSC-7CLqS2q9--BPvrLIxWExZWtRCLFSDbuRN8leduxltuKQnKMl7kcaLNGEvY2*Y/OOtwooctaveslide.mp3

Have fun!

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