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Small Cover of Mr.Crowely (Tim "Ripper" Owens Version)

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YvonMoraes
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Hello everyone!

Just tossing out there a small portion of the song sung Acapella. It's the version Tim Owens does, tell me what you think! :D

Tim Owens :

(The Covered part is from 2:43-4:00)

Me : http://www.box.net/shared/1cs32v2nl1pcn59oa1sk

thanks!

Yvon

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I am going to use a jonpall term. And I was guilty of this, myself. You are crashing your notes. The sudden descent in pitch at the end of a phrase. Get rid of that. Mechanically, the easiest thing you can do is to inhale to stop the note. That is, you are exhaling to sing. Stop the note with a sudden inhale. Or, imagine the note staying at that pitch as you stop. You have better support and note stops on the high notes. So, whatever you did there, transfer it to the lower notes.

You have good power and tone in your voice and my suggestions are simply to make the song more fluid.

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I am going to use a jonpall term. And I was guilty of this, myself. You are crashing your notes. The sudden descent in pitch at the end of a phrase. Get rid of that. Mechanically, the easiest thing you can do is to inhale to stop the note. That is, you are exhaling to sing. Stop the note with a sudden inhale. Or, imagine the note staying at that pitch as you stop. You have better support and note stops on the high notes. So, whatever you did there, transfer it to the lower notes.

You have good power and tone in your voice and my suggestions are simply to make the song more fluid.

I understand completely! Thank you for that! You mean something like this? : http://www.box.net/shared/3vs7sjsog1vzctoxqhdm

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You're still "crashing" the notes. When the word ends and your note descends to speaking range. That is what I am talking about. It takes a while to stop doing that.

Third Times the Charm :), yes I'm stubborn! http://www.box.net/shared/vyfu6cmv9n4vt1xspip1

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Excellent. Not only does the each note sound better but the whole lyric sounds connected. I used to crash notes and someone did me the favor of pointing that out. It's such a simple little thing, too. Anyway, bravo on making that change.

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Thanks alot Ronws :) I never noticed it before, I really appreciate it. Let me ask you, it's something else that has nothing to do with the above but, I find it not impossible but difficult to connect the high voice with the very high. As in, I can sing with out break from my lowest note till about a B natural, the Tenor C I have to really try and try and think and lighten a bit to hit, be real subtle ya know? When I get it right it then sounds connected and I continue on solidly up to D E F and G above that. But what usually that Tenor C is like the break point. almost as if it were a missing note between the lower headvoice/middle tones and the superhighs. Any tips you could toss my way?

thanks!

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as nothing to do with the above but, I find it not impossible but difficult to connect the high voice with the very high. As in, I can sing with out break from my lowest note till about a B natural, the Tenor C I have to really try and try and think and lighten a bit to hit, be real subtle ya know? When I get it right it then sounds connected and I continue on solidly up to D E F and G above that. But what usually that Tenor C is like the break point. almost as if it were a missing note between the lower headvoice/middle tones and the superhighs.

That break is called the passaggio. (Italian for passage or passage way). Yes, the key is to lighten, so to speak. Start out in head voice and lighten your attack as you go lower. Do that for a warm-up. Then, even when you start at a low pitch, do it lightly and add more support, as you did, when you go high.

In a traditional system, like that of Frisell, you would spend quite some time learning to take the "weight" off the notes in the passaggio.

But the advantage of always being in head resonance, even on low notes, is that it irons out a lot of that. For the passaggio or missing notes is because of a change in resonating space. The passaggio is not a physical place in your head or even what your vocal folds can do. It is a result of your brain trying to maintain volume in a certain resonating space. By starting in head and staying there, your lower tones will sound a bit softer but that is to be expected, at first.

Or, more simply, stay in head resonance, where you lower tones feel as if they are no lower than the soft palate. You miight even lose some of your lowest notes, which is not a hardship, as much as I can see. Most songs we care to sing are around and little above the passagio. Which means asking yourself what you want to do.

In an interview, Ripper Owens was asked how he got that sound. His reply is that he always had it. Training and study helped him refine what he does but he has always had that basic timbre. And when he gets raspy, it's actually more about relaxing than "adding" strength to something, per se.

Anyway, you will always have volume if you have the resonance. And that you will feel anywhere from the soft palate to behind your eyes.

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That was a great explanation Ronws! I've saved your response and I'm studying what you suggested and working on it and already feel quite a bit of the difference, when warmed up properly it's becoming easier and easier. Heck last night in the car I was singing a song I know has the high C and I did it without warmup and not realizing it

thanks again :)!

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Your welcome, Yvon. And you don't have to lose all of your low notes, they can just feel lighter than you might have been used to. But the sound will still be there. This also helps to even out the tone of your voice throughout the range, so that it doesn't sound like you have two voices, but one.

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Your welcome, Yvon. And you don't have to lose all of your low notes, they can just feel lighter than you might have been used to. But the sound will still be there. This also helps to even out the tone of your voice throughout the range, so that it doesn't sound like you have two voices, but one.

So I've noticed! :) thanks again this has actually helped me alot :)

Yvon

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