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fridrix
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Great lyrics, indeed. I like "Wilderness" the best, especially your tone at the beginning. And your voice seems stronger the higher you go, which is opposite of most people. I like the harmonic guitar arrangement. If Mark Knopfler were to do folk music like this, it would sound like this. He and you are some of the few that play harmonic notes on guitar and it really has a rich sound and feel to it.

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Ah thanks for listening . . . some great singers around here huh? :o I have spent so much effort working on my upper range that I am lost in the lower register. I think the low notes are still down there somewhere.

I don't know how interested you are in developing some lower range, especially considering the octave drops in your melody but our forum member Steven Fraser has an essay or two in the main website directly concerning the developement of bass register, though I think some of it could translate to baritone register, as well.

We had a thread in the technique section where it was noted that so many beginning singers want to hit a strat note, such as a D5 or above. In reality, most tenor songs are sung either in tenor or upper baritone with choruses and accents in tenor or high tenor, such as the upper part of the fourth register. And it is the fourth register where a lot of people, especially males, find a passagio, or troublesome area of resonance, quaintly called the difference between chest and head register. So, beginners will often seek the highest notes. I find the highest notes easiest to hit. But some stuff that transitions from 4th to 5th octave, where, for example, singer Lou Gramm (Foreigner) likes to reside, are problematic, tough, a real bitch to do, as Bob might say.

Anyway, keep up the good work and I really do like your lyrical sensibility. Anyone can phonate any note or series of notes. But, to me, a real singer is a storyteller, even if they never moved from the mic stand. Telling the story is what captures the audience. More so than theatrics. Per Steve Walsh of Kansas, leave the theatrics to those who don't have much else to offer. Which is not to totally write of showmanship. But the libretto of your song must say something, otherwise, the theatrics will mean nothin more than a visual diversion.

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Thanks I will look up that bass stuff. I do still have some trouble deciphering the technical aspects though I've read up a lot and taken a few lessons. And thanks for the lyrical encouragement, not many who appreciate that these days.

Yeah Lou Gramm . . . scary stuff.

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And yes, there are some astounding singers around here. Not the least of which is Robert Lunte, founder of the TVS training school, this forum, and it's attendant main website. He not only talks the talk, he walks the walk. He doesn't just teach it, he performs with his band and others. Mike, from Canada, turned a truly astounding submission where he sounded a lot like a young Robert Halford of Judas Priest. Jens, who's voice defies gravity. He claims to be a classic baritone but he can set the dogs to howling. Jonpall, who has crystal clear tone in everything, yet the gonads to pull off a Led Zeppelin song, while playing it, live in studio. Thanos, who is able to achieve, it seems, any effect, regardless of range. Bob, who has big, hairy cajones and could pull off any Foreigner song he cares to.

Olem, who is able to ape Brian Johnson and don't ask me how he does it, he just does it. Geno, with a classically trained voice and excellent recording skills reminds me of Steve Walsh in his intent and purity. Fahim, who at times, sounds like a well resonated and support Bryan Adams, though he has done good with Bon Jovi songs, as well. And probably has the best stage presence, next to Robert Lunte. Fahim claims to be a bit prone to stage fright but you can't tell it from his videos. And, he is a solid, hard rocking melt-your-face-off guitar player, too. I don't know what's in the water in Bangladesh but it must be something good.

I know I am forgetting some people, such as the hawaiian guy who can sing both native hawaiian music and pop. His name is too long for me to remember.

And everyone here, at least from their own perspective, wants to help. Sometimes, the advice really helps. If it doesn't that's okay, too. Everyone here supports each other in our endeavors. Singing is such a personal thing and to get up and offer what your body does is an act of courage, in and of itself. This is not karaoke where you get applause just because you had enough beers to attempt a song. People here wish to see everyone else excel.

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