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My Wild Love ( a capella version)

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forest_gimp
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It seems there is a current trend featuring songs with lower pitches than usual.

I would like to add my own, and although it isn't super low, Morrisson had a "baritonish" way of singing it.

Also, this song is great to practise and try new things. here it is :

https://www.box.com/s/rss54epukb5f1tmwnqoy

hope you like it!

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Can you please get rid of the additional doubled tracks that have the flange and the chorus effects on them and re-try with just a single, dry track? The timing on the additional tracks is a bit off and disconcerting.

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hello ron,

https://www.box.com/s/a12hf1dku3q17zjoccn9

Heres the single track version of the song. for the dual tracks, i even wanted to add other ones ( i didn't add other effects ) to make it sound like some kind of tribal chants.

I often double tracked my songs, because i thought it sounds more studio like and less pitchy. I will soon get a better sound card because i find my voice sounds a bit compressed and because i have issues with mic overloading whennever i try to cover my head voice.

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Quite a bit better because it was cleared up.

While baritone and tenor share some notes in each of the ranges, I don't hear in your voice what I would call a baritone quality.

For example of members with baritone quality, listen to Robert Lunte and Keith Geohner on low notes.

If I had to type you and offend others by typing you, I would say that you are a lyric tenor.

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Meant to add, voice type is, to me, more than just a range of notes but a timbre or tone or ring of voice.

For example, according to Owen, I am matching the key that Johnny Cash is using for "Hurt." But there is a vast difference in the tonal quality between that of myself and Benny, who has a bright ring at that low range.

That is, just because I could manage a G2 at very soft volume, right up on the mic, does not make me a baritone.

Well, a guy that can do most of the 2nd octave is not magically a tenor just because he can make a C5 or even most of the 4th octave. Tenor is also a tonal quality. At least, in my humble opinion.

Continuing my humble opinion, again, you are not baritone. You are tenor, regardless of what your top note currently is. And, in the words of Frisell (paraphrased), if you are a tenor, then train like one.

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I never pretended to be a baritone, although i believed i was when i started singing. I had a singing teacher for a while two years ago and she told me i was definitely a tenor.

But you probably suggest that this song and style of singing don't really fit the timbre of my voice, is it right, as i was trying to sound more like a baritone. I can lower more my larynx to make the sound darker, but thats all i can do indeed.

Regarding my range, my belts peak at A4, A#4 currently. My teacher told me that it was not uncommon and that she could hear that with some training i would be able to sing higher notes consistently.

I have listened to your cover, it is great you can sing a g2, even if it is a tenorish g2 hehe. I am able to sing g2 only when my voice is relaxed, and when i start being warmed up or sing high notes, i frequently lose it.

Anyways, your intuitions are good, i am defs a tenor

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I never pretended to be a baritone, although i believed i was when i started singing. I had a singing teacher for a while two years ago and she told me i was definitely a tenor.

But you probably suggest that this song and style of singing don't really fit the timbre of my voice, is it right, as i was trying to sound more like a baritone. I can lower more my larynx to make the sound darker, but thats all i can do indeed.

That just makes you a tenor trying to sound dark, which can be cool.

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