Jump to content

Change It by Stevie Ray Vaughan

Rate this topic


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

This song is normally 3:55 long but the backing track I have is 5:05. For the extra minute or so I had to ad-lib a little and add a verse or two. Also I allowed time for where a guitar solo would be. I think this was a backing track for guitar. Actually there is no guitar in it, which sounds a little odd...but...

http://www.soundclick.com/player/single_player.cfm?songid=11623665&q=hi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I liked it. Just want to mix your voice differently. I just know some good tonality is getting lost in the mic clipping.

Tomorrow I am going to try a few things. One is distance from the mic which I already tried but then the volume was too low because of it. And the other is to play with the volume controls to counter the mic distance just mentioned.

We'll see.

I thought this song came out a little weird because it was missing the guitar. But tomorrow is "Texas Flood" with plenty of guitar parts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tomorrow I am going to try a few things. One is distance from the mic which I already tried but then the volume was too low because of it. And the other is to play with the volume controls to counter the mic distance just mentioned.

Tommy, You should try those things you mentioned also, but the easiest and best sounding way to get the dynamics under control... both loud and soft... is using compression. Pretty much everybody uses some compression to even out the vocals and get it to punch thru the music better. It brings it to life from the more dull sound.

It's not cheatin' :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tommy, You should try those things you mentioned also, but the easiest and best sounding way to get the dynamics under control... both loud and soft... is using compression. Pretty much everybody uses some compression to even out the vocals and get it to punch thru the music better. It brings it to life from the more dull sound.

It's not cheatin' :lol:

I read something about that but I'm unsure of how to do it. Well....more than unsure :/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you had Cubase installed, I could give you what my settings are. But I'm really horrible at understanding what I'm doing. I know it sounds better than without it and don't really tweak it from song to song other than the gain on it. Don't know about Audacity's compression plugins, but sounds like that would be a nightmare trying to set it since you can't do any tweaking in real time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I finally got the cubase (LE 5) installed and registered today on my basement computer. I never use that computer for recording even though it's the better computer because the sound upstairs is better. But now that I think about it, that is because when I was recording without equipment, only using a camera and its mic, the "echo" in the room upstairs was great. It was built in reverb.

I am guessing that my basement, which is a finished basement with acoustic tile ceilings is better...right? The sound down there is dead and that is why I never liked it for the camera mic. There isn't any echo....I imagine that is what they call dry?

Now that I have recording equipment maybe I should start recording down there. But then I need to learn how to add the right reverb :D Anyway that computer is newer in the basement, and faster.

Anyway, I think I might take a break from posting songs for a little while. This section seems to be on overload for Tommy songs :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well that's good you got some real software... it should save you a lot of frustration in the longer run. I would definitely use the faster computer and more soundproof basement for recording... maybe that will give the rest of the household some relief also. :lol:

I'm sure it will take a little time gettig familiar with Cubase. Personally I know about 1/50th of what it can do but that's not my main concern. It's great to practice takes and listen back for improvement.

The compression plugin I'm using is called TrackPlug LE which I think is part of Cubase. You can download all kinds of free plugins, which I played around with in the past. Supposedly that not as good as the commercial ones you have to buy, but good enough for me.

One thing I do like about having decent software is I can change the key up and down with a click of the button. Some tough songs I'm learning I will sing it 2-3 steps lower until it flows more connected and then bump it up when I feel ready. Also stretching the length of the track slows it down without changing key and that's also good practice for making your cords learn a lot of useful maneuvers finding stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing I do like about having decent software is I can change the key up and down with a click of the button. Some tough songs I'm learning I will sing it 2-3 steps lower until it flows more connected and then bump it up when I feel ready.

I saw that you can do that on Audacity also and it has been on my mind. You don't know how bad I would love to sing "Loving Touching And Squeezing" by Journey :D When I sing it by myself I sing it good but with the track in the original key? No way....lol.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In recording an analog signal such as voice into digital, it is an established fact that just about 50 percent of the signal is lost. And that is why any vocal recorded needs some compression. Either with an in-line effect, such as a compressor stage before the interface, or post recording, by applyin a compression effect to the track. And this should happen before any equalization or echo or reverb, or whatever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Hey Blues man

Good pitch, like the vibrato, tone of voice is fine but try this: Put a piece of thread on your head down your chin, try to sing without moving the thread.

You are wasting your air... it makes your tone louder and not refined and emotional.

When you go higher you're forcing to much air out your mouth by your throat...you have to push your air up to your forehead by contracting your abdomen a bit like when you say "get out" to someone you don't like. Put your hand on your stomach and say "get out".

Now you see that your voice is not in the throat but in the speakers of your forehead.

Yes we have 2 cavities in the back of our scull they play a great role in singing.

Aim your sound up, you will see how much more power without going loud you'll get

For more tips go check my free singing tips and techniques

Regards

Tanya

thesingingjudge.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Put a piece of thread on your head down your chin, try to sing without moving the thread.

Tanya

thesingingjudge.com

I had not heard of this but it reminds of the singing in front of a candle thingy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...