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Would this be considered a mixed Falsetto/ Head voice approach?

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wabba_treads
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Hey everyone, wabba here! I'm new here to the site and I just was wondering if there is such a thing as a head/falsetto mix. I'll be singing/ playing the messa de voce intro to the classic Dreamer Deceiver. I was just practicing singing and playing guitar at the same time so I figured that song is a good place to start lol. I was gonna continue but my dad kinda interrupted me >.<. I'm open to any kind of feedback so I won't get butthurt about anything lol. Thanks

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Thanks for the feedback man! I don't normally have a raspy voice its just when I sing in that register after a while that tends to happen for some reason. I had allergies that day so maybe that could be it. I had to tune my 12-string guitar a step up because that seems to be the money note and me being a baritone I had to make some adjustments lol.

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Thanks for the feedback man! I don't normally have a raspy voice its just when I sing in that register after a while that tends to happen for some reason. I had allergies that day so maybe that could be it. I had to tune my 12-string guitar a step up because that seems to be the money note and me being a baritone I had to make some adjustments lol.

I'm a baritone too; I tried to sing it the same way you did and it did feel kind of mixish, but I wouldn't really know for sure how your particular voice operates. Whatever it is, it is predominantly chest to the point where you might as well consider it such.

If you're a baritone, I doubt you'd really have to mix that low. I tend to only be concerned with these things for high notes.

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I normally try to avoid mixing that low in my range, its just for that particular song Rob Halford used this beautifully- resonant unique breathy head voice that sounded something like maybe a reinforced falsetto with head voice in the mix that I found pretty rad. Once again I appreciate your critique!

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Hey everyone, wabba here! I'm new here to the site and I just was wondering if there is such a thing as a head/falsetto mix.

You're not any voice type. Neither am I. Unless it is the song you are singing. I just wondered how you determined that you are a baritone when, in another thread, I think you said you were new to singing. Anyway, never mind, throw out what you think you know about voice types.

I like what you did here and I thought I could hear some Halford-like tonality in there, not that I care. I don't care if you sound like the original singer, or not.

As far as calling it a mix of falsetto and headvoice, mas o menos. If calling it that helps you for now, fine. But really, it's just different vibratory modes. Think of shifting modes, rather than distinct voices being "mixed." To quote our benefator, Robert Lunte, "mixed voice is dead."

I think that mainly because I think any well-calibrated singing voice is all mixed. Therefore, deciding that one section of the range is "mixed" is a bit misleading. Get away from "registers," get away from descriptions like baritone or tenor. The last is really hard to do. It was for me. I am nominally a "tenor." But that can be limiting, too.

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If you want to make a distinction between chest/head voice it would probably be a light head voice I guess. At least on these high notes. It's all just different degrees of cord closure to be honest, different intensity. Based on the timbre I think it's neutral without air in CVT terms.

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Thanks for the insight ronws. I'm just now learning the technicalities of singing I've been singing on my own for a while now with no formal lessons yet but thats probably happening in the near future. ^.^ When Robert means "mixed voice" is dead is he pointing out that if you can bridge your passagio, there would be little difference between the registers of your voice and it will all sound as one steady tone no matter how high or low your voice goes?

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Thanks for the insight ronws. I'm just now learning the technicalities of singing I've been singing on my own for a while now with no formal lessons yet but thats probably happening in the near future. ^.^ When Robert means "mixed voice" is dead is he pointing out that if you can bridge your passagio, there would be little difference between the registers of your voice and it will all sound as one steady tone no matter how high or low your voice goes?

Yeah, kind of like that. Someone once asked the general question "Where do you bridge into head voice?"

My reply was, "When I open my mouth to sing."

You do not sing like you speak. So, when singing, start out in "singer" voice and stay there. Breath management is always engaged. Resonance can be varied, to suit your needs.

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