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Twang or air pressure?

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hummingbird25
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Hey YouCanSingAnything,

Thanks for your answers.

I should've been more clear, but medium thickness doesn't tell me wether she is in her thick fold or thin fold mechanism.

I know she does use twang but is it just to the minimum or does she use as much as i.e. Miley Cyrus (which i really dislike the voice).?

I do appreciate your answers.

 

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HI again!

Thank you so much for helping and I listened to your clip. I appreciate you showing a clip you demostrating the sound :)

I am familiar with CVT, although this method gives me a lot of confusion, but the moan/creak that you refer is the cry technique I've learned. I am familiar with vocal process, it's very similar to Estill techinque.

I think you sort of gave me a good track of answers to my questions anyway.

If I show you a clip of my singing, what am I doing with my voice here? Do I use any twang at all? In CVT i think it's either nessesary or distinct twang. What do I do? http://vocaroo.com/i/s0o1h1B9gzUL

Oh and on the very last part "My heart continue to be." I always get airy and loose volume. I am still sort of chesty, but quietly. Shall I hear learn o add more twang to up the volume? I sort of place the tone more into my nose (Not trying to sound nasal).

Thanks a lot for your help.

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Twang's benefit is analygous to taking a water hose and kinking the hose to produce additional pressure by lessening the opening.

In effect, you've increased the water pressure with no additional corresponding increase in water flow.

As far as her singing, you really cannot tell how much vocal fold mass is engaged simply because you're not her.  You can guess, but when you really get down to it, you cannot tell for sure.

Tristan, going by strict CVT terms curbing is singing with vowels/throat shapes which produce a restrained or covered sound. It's not typically a loud volume mode.

"EH" is not a curbing vowel.

 

 

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VideoHere,

Thanks for your answers. How does she obtain a chesty color sound so high up as she does in the clip?

Have you seen my clip? What do I do different to her?

I posted a youtube clip about breath control and support it's really worth watching it. She is amazing. And I think she is a CVT teacher as well! :o

I always thought a singer is singing Curbing when the "Cry" is engaged?

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BOTH. Sub-glottal respiration pressure engages in BALANCE with the glottal compression. Less experienced singers will squeeze the glottis too much and become fatigued and/or sound more quacky... more experienced singers will contract and add compression to the vocal folds, enough to anchor or stabilize the vocal folds / CT/TA... and enable most of the energy to come from sub-glottal respiration pressure. When this happens, you get a wonderful application of the voice as well as freedom and movement.

There is a lesson in the TVS training program called, "Vocal Fold Adduction: Twanging VS Bernoulli Physics" that discusses and addresses that very question. It has a full HD video lecture, demonstrations, text, lesson, quiz, etc...

From "The Four Pillars of Singing"

The_Four_Pillars_of_Singing_Compression_

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Hey YouCanSingAnything,

Thanks for your answers.

I should've been more clear, but medium thickness doesn't tell me wether she is in her thick fold or thin fold mechanism.

I know she does use twang but is it just to the minimum or does she use as much as i.e. Miley Cyrus (which i really dislike the voice).?

I do appreciate your answers.

 

So, is there a range of thickness between medium in thick and medium in thin fold mechanism? How incremental can it be?

 

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Hello YouCanSingAnything,

Thank you very much for the compliments regarding my voice.

I will try today the advice you gave me, although I am already crying/moaning and if I would apply more of this I would probably constrict? And I fully understand the sounds that you show me in the clips, although I get very unsuccessful by imitating other singers.  BUT!

Is it possible that I may need to twang more to easier get the "curbing sound"?

I will experiment with my own invented exercise today. First sing "Ee" in Neutral, than sing "Ee" with twang, than sing "Ee" with twang and add the cry. Do you think this could help me find the curbing/thicker fold mechanism?

Here is an example of what I mean what I wanna try to work on. Is it safe? And according to this sample do I do "Neutral to Neutral with twang to Curbing"? http://vocaroo.com/i/s1zAZvZIcsnd

 

thanks for all the help and information!! Much appreciated.

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Thanks, Tristan, for answering honestly that question. I fear the danger of trying to dice it into even smaller portions, infinitessimally smaller gradations and transitions. Though that mental image may also help someone. 

For here is the next step. Not only do you have the different states of vibration or various involvement of mass and edge of adduction but I think they are also more advantageous to one part of the range than another. Just as the example with the guitar string. Can one conceivably make a 10 gauge that is made and massive enough to sound full and right at E2 in standard open tuning ring ring a D4 or higher? Maybe, and then it will break. Better to change to the smaller gauged strings in the set that not only get the higher pitch more easily but more fully for that size of note. And I expect this will be lost on a lot of people who are hell-bent to run the whole range in chest voice, m1, "full adduction" or think they are because the notes sounded and felt loud and full to them, though they were really making adjustments all the time.

Some will try to do that simply because they like doing what they think is the opposite of what others say, simply for the sake of argument. Others will try that because it is their faith to do so, regardless of how much research has been done or will be done. In fact, singing is a micro-cosm of life, some times.

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BOTH. Sub-glottal respiration pressure engages in BALANCE with the glottal compression. Less experienced singers will squeeze the glottis too much and become fatigued and/or sound more quacky... more experienced singers will contract and add compression to the vocal folds, enough to anchor or stabilize the vocal folds / CT/TA... and enable most of the energy to come from sub-glottal respiration pressure. When this happens, you get a wonderful application of the voice as well as freedom and movement.

There is a lesson in the TVS training program called, "Vocal Fold Adduction: Twanging VS Bernoulli Physics" that discusses and addresses that very question. It has a full HD video lecture, demonstrations, text, lesson, quiz, etc...

From "The Four Pillars of Singing"

The_Four_Pillars_of_Singing_Compression_

Hey guys, one of my students just shared this with me... it has a nice little explanation of Bernoulli physics and "closed quotient".

 

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Tristan, the reason why the moan or cry makes the transition smoother is because it facillitates consistent adduction. But it can easliy be done incorrectly and lock up the voice or throw things way off balance.

Also, Humming is not just in Neutral in the first example, but curbing as well.  Modes change.... sometimes within a little as a syllable. Some singers are natural curbers.

 

Rob, Awesome larynx video.

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Bottom line: Yes, everybody's different.  Nothing is cut and dry.

An "h" does the opposite for me...the "h" softens (for lack of a better word) a hard attack (onset).  A "sh" can help too.  

You have to stay very open minded, because again, you're not that singer.  A voice teacher's job (seems like you're moving in that direction) is to bring out the best in each individual singer.

You may hear light mass or heavy mass phonation, doesn't mean it actually is.  Just like perceived volume and loudness....

So much has to be figured out by the singer by extensive trial and error.  :) 

 

 

 

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