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Third gig with the band...

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Snejk
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First gig was a total disaster in every way imaginable culminating in the bass players A string breaking in the middle of the first song without a replacement... I was stiff as the microphone stand and my voice was at around 65% of it's capacity.

Second gig was better, we liked what we heard and saw and my voice was at around 80% with some high notes failing... I was still standing still as a lamp post...

Third gig.. MILES away from the other gigs.. I actually MOVED and LOOKED at people... Haha! I feel so extremely proud of myself *pats on own back*... I can't stress how much stage fright I've got... It's insane.. Shaking like a leaf.... My voice was at around 75% here... I had slept 2 hours during the night and woke up at 3 AM, going to work long shift at the job then going to the rehearsal studio immediately to get things in order for the gig... No sleep whatsoever inbetween.. During gen-rep I felt how sluggish my voice was and I couldn't get the high notes.. It was at around 60% there...

After 2 beers however I got my energy back and the voice started to feel more maneuverable again...

I am more than pleased with my performance! My voice is lacking a bit more than usual but my presence is much better than it's ever been!

It's a shame that the sound technician gave me not the slightest reverb though :c

http://youtu.be/N5dBlVdW-gg?t=7m46s

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I was going to say, it's a rough mix but, hey, it's live. On one of those little stages that normally holds a pool table, it looks like.

Is that a 6-string bass? Dude is a monster. Ich habe der Bass gern. Nice, crunchy thump.

It gave me an idea of what would happen of JP did something prog length, like this. i'm not sure if it was the mix but the last siren sound a cent or two off. But I wouldn't care. It's live and anyone who thinks they can do better, get your happy self up there and try it.

Anyone can spend a month in their dining room or whatever and comp a take and mix it like a pro. Or video themselves in a calm and quiet location, looking only at the red light on the camera. It's another thing to get up in front of live, paying customers drinking real beer and they don't care about the tech talk. You are either good, or not. Pass, or fail.

I would say that you passed.

If you had a bigger stage, your movements could be expanded. The arm movements are about all you can do. If you get into a busby berkley routine or even an Axl Rose spin, you're going to take out half the band and that would be a disaster.

I bet, once you get to a bigger stage, your moves will amplify. Again, anyone willing to judge how you move, they really need to video themselves in concert in a real venue. Live is where it is at.

The whole band is good, as far as I can hear. The drummer was playing simple, probably to give the other instruments and your voice some space.

I love some of the darker sounds on your low notes. Way cool.

And it's good to hear from you, again, Pat. You and the band rock, and rock well. Tell them I said that. Not that my opinion is all that important. But, half a chance, I'm one of the people in the club with a beer, hootin' and hollerin'.

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Hey Ron, good to hear from you! :S how are things?

Yeah it's live, with a sound technician who didn't know what she was doing (we had her all 3 gigs).. The drummer actually EQ'd up the voice so it's audible. After the gig I was told that 'It would have been nice to have heard you.. Even the guitarists backup mics were louder than yours...'

But that don't bother me too much because we're on our way forward with leaps and these experiences, where everything is sub-optimal is invaluable in order to improve and be a flexible musician.

MANY things here are morw than just a few cents off :P one thing that I believe is both a blessing and a curse is that I can't stop myself from improvising... That siren I just tried out on the spot... Same with a lot of wails, growls and alterations to the melodies... I don't know... I think it's important for me to keep the singing alive and not TOO predictable (even if the melodies are awesome (my very humble opinion of course xD))

Yeah, bigger stages - more movement..

But like I said.. I'm so nervous and have such stage fright that I've ALWAYS stood completely still with closed eyes while singing... This was such a huge step for me - it looks like I actually interact with people/the audience xD

I'll be sure to tell em!!

Thanks for the honest feedback! :D

EDIT: yeah it's. 6-string he plays :3 he's by FAR the most musical and advanced of us.. He is only 22 but works as a bass teacher ._. he can shred on that bad boy faster than the guitarists :P he is schooled on double bass and plays jazz mainly, knows everything there is about musical theory.. One gets jealous -.-

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Another thing I noticed. I watched your posture. And you had good posture, mostly neutral. No shoulder heaving, which means you were driving the notes from the belly. And that's the only way to have endurance for a 14+ minute song.

So, you've got some solid technique and an excellent use of your range. I think your voice is a good match for the music you are doing.

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Man you look good on stage! \m/

I like the energy and the band is much more tight now.

Felt your voice a little "low", but you said you are tired and the mix sucked, so its more than normal.

Stage fright goes away, more gigs and you will be at home up there. Send some more :)

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Hey, thanks for the feedback guys ;D

Yeah Ron, glad you noticed that! I know that in order to get a full and confident sound without "glissing" up to a note, I need to attack it in a certain way. I can't do that slouching or, well, you know "trying it out"...

My voice not being at it's optimal shape did make it "heavier" so I couldn't carry it with all the agility I usually have but listening to this I try to acknowledge my positives as well as analyzing and not being afraid to realize my shortcomings...

Felipe; It really means alot coming from you! We have so much fun together in and outside of music and I think that's a big reason we can wear these outfits and get away with it 3 gigs in... We're very comfortable with eachother.

My voice is a bit low, yes. Like I said, the 2 hours of sleep did not do my voice any favors, so it was a challenge to attempt each high note (and even regular notes as I "just would get it spot on") since my voice felt so heavy...

But I see this as education; there will be PLENTY more gigs like this and in the end I want to deliver to the best of my ability; be that ability at peak or with limitations ;)

Yeah! We will rock out more and I'll be sure to be a nuisance and keep the boards flooded with "look at us! gig #54" etc threads ;D

MDEW; Aye the feeling is totally amazing! The stage fright is mostly consisting of me actually "taking myself seriously" and not fooling around too much. I can act like a fool and do that with confidence but.. Actually saying "hey guys, thanks for listening to us!" and thinking that I'm actually good at something.. I wasn't raised like that haha -_-; It's easier to say something silly in a weird dialect after a song has ended :D

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But I see this as education; there will be PLENTY more gigs like this and in the end I want to deliver to the best of my ability; be that ability at peak or with limitations ;)

You always give the best that you have, pass or fail. No retreat, no surrender. No quarter given, none expected.

Stagefright - a condition where you are more concerned about what people think of you than being concerned about the song. Sing it as if you are a fan of the song, sing it as if you are one of the members of the audience.

There will be good and bad nights. But every night is 100% Pat, the "Snake."

And yes, it's still not fair that you are so offensively pretty. You are the chick magnet for the band. Get used to that.

Me, I would be better off auditioning for a resurrection of GWAR, where I could at least wear a full costume.

:lol:

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Aye.. I've started to live out more based on how I feel the music rather than trying to deliver what I expect people would most likely hear...

Hahaha... Oh the ladies... I can't really see how you ever had a problem getting a few though ;)

Here is a little snippet from how I want my voice to be -always-. (I improvised this on the spot since the melody goes down and not up... I was kind of surprised I could sustain that note without going mix/overdrive -_-

http://youtu.be/LRGknafCv9M?t=1m20s

(from our second gig)

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Aye.. I've started to live out more based on how I feel the music rather than trying to deliver what I expect people would most likely hear...

That's the secret to singing. Doing your thing, instead of someone else's.

Hahaha... Oh the ladies... I can't really see how you ever had a problem getting a few though ;)

Actually, I've met the women in my life in winter time. Essentially, I am a space heater that knows how to cook. And because I look intimidating, they feel protected. So, think of a rottweiler that can smoke a brisket or make pasta.

:D

Here is a little snippet from how I want my voice to be -always-. (I improvised this on the spot since the melody goes down and not up... I was kind of surprised I could sustain that note without going mix/overdrive -_-

http://youtu.be/LRGknafCv9M?t=1m20s

(from our second gig)

I liked this one, too. In this one, I could hear the drums. I liked the double time on the kick drum. That along with the tom gave a locomotive feel.

I think what is valuable about the lower end of the voice is that the overtones are closer together, and they get some amplification. This results in a "rounder" tone than higher notes. And it also blends more easily with the voice of your guitarist (on your left.)

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Good stuff.

Strange about the bass player, though. It's crazy enough not to have a backup instrument, but to not have extra strings on hand??

As for stagefright, for many, they believe being stiff or "wooden" is safe because there's less for the crowd to judge them on, but the fact of the matter is, they want to see you loose, free, expressive, and energetic. They want to be entertained. Give them what they want. Nothing clears a room out quicker than failing to engage the crowd.

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^

Totally agree with Validar. Look at Joe Cocker. Acted like he was having a seizure. The audience ate it up.

Do the craziest thing you can think of. And be suprised how many people liked your "singing." You can stand there and sing something legit and perfect. But shake you behind, and now, you are a great singer.

Live is where it's at.

Me, I've got an Elvis leg. And I look people straight in the eye because I really am singing to them.

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^

Totally agree with Validar. Look at Joe Cocker. Acted like he was having a seizure. The audience ate it up.

Do the craziest thing you can think of. And be suprised how many people liked your "singing." You can stand there and sing something legit and perfect. But shake you behind, and now, you are a great singer.

Live is where it's at.

Me, I've got an Elvis leg. And I look people straight in the eye because I really am singing to them.

Exactly.

There's a lot of bands in my area who are phenomenal from a musicianship aspect, but are complete mannequins onstage, and don't interact with the crowd very much. (poor set lists with songs that aren't very danceable, too, actually) If you're playing in a cover band and gigging the bars/clubs, unfortunately, no one cares about the artistic statement you're wanting or hoping to make. You're there for one reason - to keep people in the building, drinking and having a good time.

The best advice I got many years ago from a fellow singer was to look every woman on the dance floor in the eye, smile, and sing to them like they're the loves of your life. In between sets, go out and hug every woman and thank them for coming out. You'll get an avalanche of phone numbers (and Facebook URL's these days) written on napkins from women you won't find desirable, but that's a very minor drawback.

But anyway, Snejk, you will probably grow into your confidence sooner rather than later. You seem to be self-aware, and that's the key to correcting mistakes.

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Exactly.

There's a lot of bands in my area who are phenomenal from a musicianship aspect, but are complete mannequins onstage, and don't interact with the crowd very much. (poor set lists with songs that aren't very danceable, too, actually) If you're playing in a cover band and gigging the bars/clubs, unfortunately, no one cares about the artistic statement you're wanting or hoping to make. You're there for one reason - to keep people in the building, drinking and having a good time.

The best advice I got many years ago from a fellow singer was to look every woman on the dance floor in the eye, smile, and sing to them like they're the loves of your life. In between sets, go out and hug every woman and thank them for coming out. You'll get an avalanche of phone numbers (and Facebook URL's these days) written on napkins from women you won't find desirable, but that's a very minor drawback.

But anyway, Snejk, you will probably grow into your confidence sooner rather than later. You seem to be self-aware, and that's the key to correcting mistakes.

Well, the upside of that is increased door sales. Where the women go, the men follow, spending even more money. It counts in door receipts, album sales, merch sales. If the women don't spend the money, they get their boyfriends or husbands to do so. Or the guys buy it for the girls to woo them.

David Lee Roth, when he first got with Van Halen, they, like Journey, were this incredibly gifted instrumental band, though Michael Anthony can sing, he prefers bass and singing back-up. And were prone to play long sets that highlighted their virtuosity. And that's fine for us serious music geeks. First thing Roth did was repeat the process I just wrote about. And that the band needed to shed as much of the music that is not danceable from the set list. Because women like to dance.

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oh... and don't drink beer before singing. If you're going to drink don't drink anything with hops. Hops will dry you out and cause the cords to swell, which is a bad thing. I like shots of Malibu myself. They're safe hahaha

Scotch whiskey is basically fermented barley with lots of ambition.

:D

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Justin; thanks for the feedback!

It seems the drummer removed the clip now so I can't see what particular part you were referencing :P

I had to do alot of "compensating" this gig due to my voice being extremely heavy and unrested. I had to take some notes in overdrive that I usually can chest out easily. Now of course my technique needs tons of work but the 'a vista adapting' when my voice is sub par is always different depending on how the voice feels.

I take lessons from a regular at my coffeeshop. He works as a soloist at the Royal Opera and he told me that my voice is huge but that I am not in a million years a tenor. I could alter my color and raise my larynx to get a bright and fragile tenor sound but I will just hurt myself in the end doing such things outside the studio.

The thing is I want an extremely versatile voice. I believe that the 'heavy and boomy' sound only sounds good in about 15% of my linea due to the nature of the context of the song. Mostly I prefer the less strong but more volatile, emotive singing as in the verses of the last song.

Sometimes I enjoy the sound of the unsupported, fragile amd breathy singing that makes up the short and slow beginning of the last song..

There are a lot of pieces to fit together but I would never ever dream of having a voice with no variety...

Having heard one Rhapsody of Fire song, I've heard them all.. Fabio has one voice :/

Hansi Kürsch of Blind Guardian.. Despite me not liking his general voice color, is in such command of his voice that he can sing anything.

EDIT: the beer is tricky! It loosens me up initially and allows me for easier high notes without the risk of 'cracking' but it does indeed wear the voice out in just a few hours. Luckily our gigs are only 20-30 minutes currently. I only drink before a gig if my voice is sub-par and I refuse to alter down the high notes :p

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I totally agree- part of a singer's "technique" should be adequate rest.

I know people hate hearing advice from singers who have been doing it for 30 to 40 years, professionally.

So, of course, I must repeat it again, just to annoy others, of course. :lol:

In Bill Martin's book of interviews with the heavy rock singers, these are things mentioned in nearly every interview, without exception.

Rest. Nuff said.

Hydration (water.) Nuff said.

Do what your voice can do. Don't do what it cannot do. (the most bitter pill to swallow.)

Singing is mental. (okay, that's a ronws maxim, couldn't resist.)

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